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-   -   Read write ext2/3 in windows 7 (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/general-10/read-write-ext2-3-in-windows-7-a-811322/)

Christian271 05-31-2010 12:55 PM

Read write ext2/3 in windows 7
 
Is there some software/driver that will allow me to read and write from my Linux partition in windows 7? I found a few programs that but none of them work in win7.

Thanks in advance! :D

paulsm4 05-31-2010 12:59 PM

Suggestion:

You can always:
1. Run a linux distro in a VM
2. Share your ext2/3 drive with Samba

IMHO .. PSM

John VV 05-31-2010 11:08 PM

win 7 ?? do not know ( i never intend to buy/own it)

there are some options for XP , but in my exp every single one has had problems

the linux ntfs-3g read/rights to0 windows just fine

what i do is in linux just save it to a ntfs partition

pixellany 06-01-2010 12:09 AM

Moved to General (Not a Linux question)

I use the ext2fsd driver in XP and I have always had good luck---Don't know if it works in Win 7.

which drivers did you try and what was the problem?

smeezekitty 06-01-2010 12:54 AM

There is some out there and they work with vita so i assume they will work with 7.

pixellany 06-01-2010 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smeezekitty (Post 3988177)
There is some out there and they work with vita so i assume they will work with 7.

It would be more useful if you would give an example.

cola 06-01-2010 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paulsm4 (Post 3987652)
Suggestion:

You can always:
1. Run a linux distro in a VM
2. Share your ext2/3 drive with Samba

IMHO .. PSM

Nice +1

Jeebizz 06-01-2010 08:32 AM

www.fs-driver.org offers a driver for windows that lets you read/write ext2. It might work with ext3, but I would just use ext2 just to be safe. I don't know whether or not that driver works yet in Win7, but I am sure they might be working on one.

pixellany 06-01-2010 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paulsm4 (Post 3987652)
Suggestion:

You can always:
1. Run a linux distro in a VM
2. Share your ext2/3 drive with Samba

IMHO .. PSM

1. Someone who just wants to access their files may not want to hassle with setting up a VM. Besides, how does that allow you to access extX from Windows?

2. To share something with Samba, doesn't the Linux install (containing Samba) have to be running?

SlowCoder 06-01-2010 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John VV (Post 3988107)
what i do is in linux just save it to a ntfs partition

+1
Best solution in my opinion. Setting up a vm to run every time you want to make your files available would not be the best solution.

If the situation was reversed, where you had a native Linux install with a windows vm, samba sharing would be a perfect solution.

fbt 06-01-2010 10:58 AM

You can use the FS-driver as mentioned above and here as well http://www.go2linux.org/accessing-li...ext-with-vista I have not tried it and would be leary of allowing MS write permissions on my linux drives.

jiml8 06-01-2010 11:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeebizz (Post 3988650)
www.fs-driver.org offers a driver for windows that lets you read/write ext2. It might work with ext3, but I would just use ext2 just to be safe. I don't know whether or not that driver works yet in Win7, but I am sure they might be working on one.

It works fine with ext3. I have no idea if it works in Win7.

Edit:

I just visited the website and the site says it works in Vista and in Windows 2008 (:rolleyes:). However, it hasn't been updated in eons. I've used it for years on XP without difficulty.

smeezekitty 06-01-2010 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany (Post 3988613)
It would be more useful if you would give an example.

Forgot the name of it :(

mostlyharmless 06-01-2010 03:05 PM

Quote:

1. Someone who just wants to access their files may not want to hassle with setting up a VM. Besides, how does that allow you to access extX from Windows?

2. To share something with Samba, doesn't the Linux install (containing Samba) have to be running?
It isn't that much of a hassle, though certainly more work than ext2fs (the name of the other utility). However you can also access any other linux filesystem as well as RAID disks. You run the VM with an internal network, run samba and serve up the linux filesystems. If you want to run it all in the background, colinux can do that without any user input; just boot and access transparently. However, there isn't a 64 bit version yet.

paulsm4 06-01-2010 03:54 PM

Hi -

For whatever it's worth, running a VM might certainly be overkill in some situations ... but it's often ideal in others.

In my lab, I usually just run multiple PCs.

But on a customer site, I often need to run two PCs on the same hardware. And for better or worse - for many different reasons - Windows usually winds up being the physical host, and Linux the VM.

The upside is not only bi-directional file system access (because Linux usually is the more flexible of the two), but quick and easy access to command line tools like "grep", "sed" and "awk".

IMHO .. PSM

PS:
If you decide to go the VM route, and you happen to use VMWare ... then ThoughtPolice is a great site for getting pre-built "VM appliances":

http://www.thoughtpolice.co.uk/


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