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Old 04-19-2012, 03:03 AM   #1036
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Keep Linux task priority aligned to RTAI
Does "aligned to" here mean that Linux task priority should be kept same as RTAI?

I just need a confirmation.
 
Old 04-19-2012, 03:37 AM   #1037
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Pretty much. "Align" can mean "move or adjust into proper relationship or orientation". So not exactly "kept same as RTAI", more "in accordance with RTAI".
 
Old 04-19-2012, 03:53 AM   #1038
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alright, thanks.
 
Old 04-19-2012, 04:30 AM   #1039
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Question same word with different contexts

Can someone give me a good example of a word that can be used with different meanings in different contexts?
 
Old 04-19-2012, 04:35 AM   #1040
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajit Gunge View Post
Can someone give me a good example of a word that can be used with different meanings in different contexts?
Are you looking for this: Homonym - a homonym is, in the strict sense, one of a group of words that share the same spelling and the same pronunciation but have different meanings.

bow is mentioned in the article (a long wooden stick | the front of the ship | weapon | tied ribbon).

Hope this helps.
 
Old 04-19-2012, 04:41 AM   #1041
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Yeah. thanks Drunna.
 
Old 04-19-2012, 09:35 AM   #1042
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajit Gunge View Post
Can someone give me a good example of a word that can be used with different meanings in different contexts?
"Cleave" is an example. Two meanings, almost opposites:
http://oxforddictionaries.com/defini...leave?q=cleave
http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/cleave--2
 
Old 04-19-2012, 10:55 AM   #1043
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"Leaves"
"Shoots"

?
 
Old 04-19-2012, 12:07 PM   #1044
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
"Leaves"
"Shoots"

?
Yes. Two more with more than one meaning each.
 
Old 04-19-2012, 12:13 PM   #1045
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I remembered them from the book "Eats, shoots and leaves". ;D
 
Old 04-20-2012, 12:03 AM   #1046
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"Bitch"


http://www.wordreference.com/definition/bitch
noun - a female dog, wolf, fox, or otter.
verb - informal make spitefully critical comments.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 08:39 AM   #1047
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Code:
RTAI is said to be have shown a latency of about 26 miliseconds.
Code:
An OLD test showed that RTAI produces somewhat lower latencies than Xenomai.
Code:
Xenomai was said to have shown a latency of about 40 miliseconds.
?

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-20-2012 at 08:59 AM.
 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:20 AM   #1048
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The first sentence is definitely wrong ("to be have shown" is not English syntax)

IMHO, the other 2 sentences look correct. The last sentence, however, might be slightly overcomplicated.

As usual, Anisha. It's hard to say more without the context.

Also, see below:

Quote:
People say that she believes in miracles (Present + present)
It is said that she believes in miracles (Present + present)
She is said to believe in miracles (Present + to-infinitive)
Quote:
People said that she hated her husband (Past + Past)
It was said that she hated her husband (past + past)
She was said to hate her husband (past + to-infinitive)
Quote:
People say that she left the town. (present + past)
It is said that she left the town. (present + past)
She is said to have left the town (present + the perfect infinitive)

Quote:
People said she had moved out. (past + past perfect)
It was said she had moved out (past + past perfect)
She was said to have moved out (past + the perfect infinitive)
 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:47 AM   #1049
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"Is/was said to have shown" means somebody said so and implies doubt; perhaps the test results are not available. "Showed" is stronger; there is no doubt.
 
Old 04-22-2012, 05:46 AM   #1050
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
No.

In "Since he is 21 he has a right to vote", "Since" is a preposition and, as a preposition, can mean two distinct things: a) "continuously from or starting from the time when" or b) "because". Hence it is ambiguous and best changed to something which is not ambiguous such as "From the time he turned 21 he had a right to vote" or "Because he is 21 he has a right to vote. It might be more natural to say "the right to vote" but that is arguable.

"But not in another country he has" is not English word-ordering. For simplicity the idea could be tagged on to the end of the previous sentence by changing "a right to vote" to "a right to vote in this country".
Well, doesn't this phrase sound similarly? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Co-2xRN7iq8 (00:50)

Quote:
Not even on the trailer did I have breaklights.
 
  


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