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Old 04-06-2012, 04:55 AM   #1021
catkin
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From http://grammar.about.com/od/pq/g/propnounterm.htm: "Most proper nouns (for example, Fred, New York, Mars, Coca Cola) begin with a capital letter. Proper nouns are not usually preceded by articles or other determiners. Most proper nouns are singular".

So "not usually" but it could arise when "The" is part of the proper noun as in "The Houses of Parliament are in London".

EDIT: and it is sometimes used humorously to convey distinction to the proper noun, for example "Got a hangover? Been out with the Fred have you?"

Last edited by catkin; 04-06-2012 at 04:57 AM.
 
Old 04-06-2012, 05:02 AM   #1022
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Been out with the Fred have you?"
Is there supposed to be a comma after Fred? Just curious. No, haven't read "Eats, shoots, and leaves" yet.

Been out with the Fred, have you?
 
Old 04-06-2012, 05:07 AM   #1023
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Is there supposed to be a comma after Fred?
Optional IMHO. Insofar as it could be used to indicate a pause in speech, I think the humour works better without it.
 
Old 04-07-2012, 06:33 AM   #1024
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Being polite is of course nice and compulsory too, but I don't think there is any need to be "too" polite. The statement which you suggested in the previous post sounds as if one is "desperate" to get help. I don't want to sound "desperate".
I find describing my sentence as "desperate" would easily offend me if I did not know you; but I do know you so I find I do not mind you naming the sentence so, at all. I also would take offence at "sugar coated" for I think that whilst the said sentence is sweetened, it is far far from "sugar Coated"

I see a lesson here for me (and you) tell me if you understand the following phrase: "Horses for Courses" or "Circumstances alters cases"

Ie, when writing to your unknown art critics you take one tone (course), but when talking to me and other forum members you may be more relaxed. I confess I am amused by desperate and sugar coated as overstatements - but I know what you're trying to say,
 
Old 04-07-2012, 06:57 AM   #1025
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
I find describing my sentence as "desperate" would easily offend me
I am not really sure what's offending in that. We are discussing English here.
I called "that sentence" desperate. I didn't call "you" anything.
I don't think it'll be fair if you say that you "owned" that sentence.

I don't even remember my using "really want to hear your thoughts"
in real life too.. I would write that to a person of whom I am actually
a fan of! The word "really" is making a difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
I also would take offence at "sugar coated"
In this thread at least I haven't remarked any of your statements as
"sugar coated", have I?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
when talking to me and other forum members you may be more relaxed.
That's because I have spent a long time here, I know many people around.
I know the culture here, so I think it may make sense for me to be myself
when I am among my friends?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
I confess I am amused by desperate and sugar coated as overstatements - but I know what you're trying to say,
"desperate" may be an over statement perhaps, but I don't know any other
"light" word to convey my feelings -- sorry.

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-07-2012 at 06:58 AM.
 
Old 04-07-2012, 07:22 AM   #1026
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All qutes are from Anisha Kaul's post #1025

Quote:
I am not really sure what's offending in that. We are discussing English here. called "that sentence" desperate. I didn't call "you" anything. I don't think it'll be fair if you say that you "owned" that sentence.
I son't really mean that I personally took any offence - the missing word is "if" it where a real life situation , then you MAY in effect be calling the writer desparate - Anxious may be a less confronting word to use



Quote:
I don't even remember my using "really want to hear your thoughts"
in real life too.. I would write that to a person of whom I am actually
a fan of! The word "really" is making a difference.
Point taken'



Quote:
That's because I have spent a long time here, I know many people around.
I know the culture here, so I think it may make sense for me to be myself
when I am among my friends?
Perfectly right - you have taken my piont and explained it even better - This is exactly what horses for courses means

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-07-2012 at 05:35 PM. Reason: Replace temp answer
 
Old 04-10-2012, 10:53 AM   #1027
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How do you pronounce "puts" in

Code:
he puts the plate on the table.
?

Shall you say the "s" like making a snake, or regularly in the street/outside/... you never hear this "s"
 
Old 04-10-2012, 01:05 PM   #1028
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In Australia we sound the "s" in puts as in hiss. But there are a few different dialects here and there would be some areas that would leave the "s" silent

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-10-2012 at 01:09 PM. Reason: info
 
Old 04-11-2012, 03:58 AM   #1029
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Quote:
You also need to back off a bit from all the questions,
Does this mean that "You need to stop asking more questions now"?
 
Old 04-11-2012, 06:07 AM   #1030
druuna
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Quote:
You also need to back off a bit from all the questions,
Does this mean that "You need to stop asking more questions now"?
Not exactly. One is still allowed to ask questions (or a question), but not the amount one did before.

On the other hand, if you take cultural/regional differences and being (too) polite into account, it could mean "Shut up, I'm sick of all these questions!". Depends a bit on the context/place.
 
Old 04-11-2012, 08:05 AM   #1031
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Alright, thanks for the clarification.
 
Old 04-15-2012, 11:37 PM   #1032
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Quote:
how long it takes for each pair (of processes) to send data back and forth.
In the current context, back and forth means sending and receiving data?
 
Old 04-16-2012, 05:32 AM   #1033
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
In the current context, back and forth means sending and receiving data?
I'm not a native speaker, but I guess so, yes. (Something that moves back and forth is something that moves in two opposite directions, like when someone is sitting in a high chair and starts swinging his/her legs back and forth).
 
Old 04-18-2012, 11:09 AM   #1034
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
In Australia we sound the "s" in puts as in hiss. But there are a few different dialects here and there would be some areas that would leave the "s" silent
thank you.

And in US? what is common?
 
Old 04-18-2012, 12:18 PM   #1035
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I don't understand this terminology:

"Commander in chief"

I don't understand the use of the word 'in'.

Can someone explain this to me?

Thanks,
 
  


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