LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 02-27-2012, 10:45 AM   #976
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Alex View Post
Why "user" (singular) closed "their" (plural) account?
In this context, "their" is the asexual form of "his" or "her".
 
Old 02-27-2012, 11:06 AM   #977
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,524
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997
Because in English there is no grammatical gender and the user can be either male or female so in order not to discriminate either of the sexes we can write his/her account or shortly their account.
 
Old 03-06-2012, 10:25 PM   #978
odiseo77
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian Sid, OpenSUSE 13.1
Posts: 947

Rep: Reputation: 273Reputation: 273Reputation: 273
Hello,

Could someone please tell me what is the correct way to say this?:

Quote:
I would like to know the address of the office to which I must send the correspondence
Quote:
I would like to know the address of the office which I must send the correspondence to
I have the feeling that none of the above are correct, but I can't find other way to say it properly. (Or maybe the first one is fine?)

Thanks in advance.

Last edited by odiseo77; 03-06-2012 at 10:27 PM.
 
Old 03-06-2012, 10:38 PM   #979
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175
Both are correct but unnecessarily complex. How about "Where should I send the correspondence?"?
 
Old 03-06-2012, 10:50 PM   #980
odiseo77
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian Sid, OpenSUSE 13.1
Posts: 947

Rep: Reputation: 273Reputation: 273Reputation: 273
Thanks, catkin. You're right about the phrase being too complex. I wrote it like that because it was meant for a formal e-mail sent to a university (I used the second form). Didn't want to sound too dry or informal, but I think your phrase is better. (I have to get familiar with formal English and its differences with informal English).

Regards.
 
Old 03-06-2012, 11:11 PM   #981
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175
A useful test is to ask whether the text is intended to impress the reader with the writer's sophistication or to communicate clearly.

EDIT: for a "formal" text: proper language, due respect and cross-references are required while they would not be in a text to a friend. By "cross-references" I mean the text should have a subject and should quote the reference number and date of any prior communication, the sender's reference number (examples: payroll number, policy number ...).

Last edited by catkin; 03-06-2012 at 11:18 PM.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 04:47 PM   #982
odiseo77
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian Sid, OpenSUSE 13.1
Posts: 947

Rep: Reputation: 273Reputation: 273Reputation: 273
Got it; thanks for the suggestions.
 
Old 03-08-2012, 10:43 PM   #983
Da_Nuke
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2011
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
How do you call these constructions that are about 3 meters each side and 1 meter tall, which are full of soil and have trees and plants growing there?

In Mexican Spanish they're called "jardineras", but I just can't seem to find the correct word for it.
 
Old 03-09-2012, 07:55 AM   #984
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175
Maybe Jardiniere where it is something smaller than you describe but Wikipedia's page (linked from The Free Dictionary's page) allows for bigger ones.
 
Old 03-09-2012, 08:22 AM   #985
cascade9
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Brisneyland
Distribution: Debian, aptosid
Posts: 3,718

Rep: Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Da_Nuke View Post
How do you call these constructions that are about 3 meters each side and 1 meter tall, which are full of soil and have trees and plants growing there?

In Mexican Spanish they're called "jardineras", but I just can't seem to find the correct word for it.
Planter. Which can mean anything from a pot up to large constructions.
 
Old 03-09-2012, 08:40 AM   #986
Mr. Alex
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Distribution: Arch + X.org + IceWM
Posts: 1,193

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Is this phrase correct to say?

Quote:
Since he is 21 he has a right to vote. But not in another country he has.
Meaning simply that he doesn't have the right to vote in another country.
 
Old 03-10-2012, 02:32 AM   #987
Xeratul
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Debian Land
Posts: 1,320

Rep: Reputation: 83
A question. how to say that the body is stress (under pressure) with another word than STRESS

stress also means from work and so on. Here it would be more on condition, physical efforts, medicines, ... not necessarily due to stress. stress is not a good word since it also denotes work stuffs.

Last edited by Xeratul; 03-10-2012 at 02:37 AM.
 
Old 03-10-2012, 03:37 AM   #988
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Alex View Post
Is this phrase correct to say?
No.

In "Since he is 21 he has a right to vote", "Since" is a preposition and, as a preposition, can mean two distinct things: a) "continuously from or starting from the time when" or b) "because". Hence it is ambiguous and best changed to something which is not ambiguous such as "From the time he turned 21 he had a right to vote" or "Because he is 21 he has a right to vote. It might be more natural to say "the right to vote" but that is arguable.

"But not in another country he has" is not English word-ordering. For simplicity the idea could be tagged on to the end of the previous sentence by changing "a right to vote" to "a right to vote in this country".
 
Old 03-10-2012, 03:40 AM   #989
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,524
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175Reputation: 1175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
A question. how to say that the body is stress (under pressure) with another word than STRESS

stress also means from work and so on. Here it would be more on condition, physical efforts, medicines, ... not necessarily due to stress. stress is not a good word since it also denotes work stuffs.
AFAIK English has no word that distinguishes work-related stress from non-work-related stress.

The Thesaurus section of http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Stress backs up my opoinion.
 
Old 03-27-2012, 07:13 AM   #990
Mr. Alex
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Distribution: Arch + X.org + IceWM
Posts: 1,193

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Why do English-speaking nations call animals "he"/"she" but not "it"? In English language an animal is "it", right? And always has been. Looks like not any more.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 03:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 06:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 03:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 07:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 03:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:00 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration