LinuxQuestions.org
View the Most Wanted LQ Wiki articles.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 05-05-2011, 08:17 AM   #736
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,030
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled

It might be useful to read English novels, old and new, as well as having a good dictionary handy. Get some knowledge of spoken and written language from them.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 09:25 AM   #737
SL00b
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: LA, US
Distribution: SLES
Posts: 375

Rep: Reputation: 111Reputation: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
It might be useful to read English novels, old and new, as well as having a good dictionary handy. Get some knowledge of spoken and written language from them.
Solid advice, but I'd add that you should be careful what you read. I had a co-worker once with atrocious writing skills, and I offered this advice. A few weeks later she showed me she'd followed my advice and was reading a book... by Maya Angelou. I flipped it open to a random page, and the grammar and syntax were AWFUL.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 09:36 AM   #738
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,030
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Yeah, that is the problem: choosing what to read. I was hoping Anisha wouldn't ask for examples.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 09:38 AM   #739
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,564
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024Reputation: 1024
Quote:
Originally Posted by SL00b View Post
Solid advice, but I'd add that you should be careful what you read. I had a co-worker once with atrocious writing skills, and I offered this advice. A few weeks later she showed me she'd followed my advice and was reading a book... by Maya Angelou. I flipped it open to a random page, and the grammar and syntax were AWFUL.
+1

For that reason, Brian was referring to Beowulf and Ulysses
 
Old 05-05-2011, 09:46 AM   #740
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,030
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
+1

For that reason, Brian was referring to Beowulf and Ulysses
...but avoid Finnegans Wake.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 10:00 AM   #741
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,622
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896Reputation: 896
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
I was hoping Anisha wouldn't ask for examples.
Thanks for the nice advice, now how about giving some examples?
I was thinking of reading Shakespeare's works, it that a right choice? I'll be using the same English in the LQ posts too, then.
Novels which I won't prefer are the ones which deal ONLY with the subjects like detectives and romance.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 10:41 AM   #742
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,030
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Shakespeare's plays are great, but you won't learn anything about modern English usage from them. After a quick think, I came up with these few more up-to-date novelists: John Fowles, Ian McEwan, William Golding, Martin Amis, Peter Ackroyd. Those are English English. There are some good American novelists, but I'll let a US member choose a few of them.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 11:07 AM   #743
SL00b
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: LA, US
Distribution: SLES
Posts: 375

Rep: Reputation: 111Reputation: 111
I would not recommend Shakespeare. It's not even an accurate representatation of Rennaissance English. It's more poetry than prose, and excessively flowery poetry at that. If you start talking and typing like him, you're going to make people's heads hurt.

Before I could make any recommendations, I'd need to know what it is you like to read. For the most part, any modern prose will do. Maya Angelou is one of the exceptions, she is definitely not the rule.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 11:37 AM   #744
portia
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 112

Rep: Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Shakespeare's plays are great, but you won't learn anything about modern English usage from them. After a quick think, I came up with these few more up-to-date novelists: John Fowles, Ian McEwan, William Golding, Martin Amis, Peter Ackroyd. Those are English English. There are some good American novelists, but I'll let a US member choose a few of them.
You might also try Nick Hornby (Apart from "Fever Pitch," unless you are a big fan of Arsenal)
 
Old 05-05-2011, 12:47 PM   #745
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 3,074

Rep: Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788
For those who enjoy SF, Ursula LeGuin, Lois Bujold, and Jack Vance write excellent English. For detective fiction, see P. D. James. The classic British writers of the last century included Evelyn Waugh and Anthony Powell. Two of the best purely from the point of view of prose style were P. G. Woodhouse and Anais Nin (now, if they'd ever met, I wonder what they'd have talked about?!)
 
Old 05-05-2011, 03:05 PM   #746
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Lubuntu
Posts: 19,176
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430
My English teacher always maintained that, although the books themselves were completely dull, Jane Austen's novels are a good example of correctly written English.
 
Old 05-05-2011, 03:18 PM   #747
Jeebizz
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64-bit with multilib
Posts: 2,074

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199
failenglish.jpg
 
Old 05-06-2011, 10:34 AM   #748
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 3,074

Rep: Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788Reputation: 788
Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP View Post
My English teacher always maintained that, although the books themselves were completely dull, Jane Austen's novels are a good example of correctly written English.
Excellent prose, but not contemporary. But dull? Henry Green, Virginia Wolfe: that's dull.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 11:55 AM   #749
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Lubuntu
Posts: 19,176
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430
I haven't read them myself (although "Pride & Prejudice and Zombies" and "Sense & Sensibility and Sea Monsters" were fun) so I can't say either way.
 
Old 05-06-2011, 12:15 PM   #750
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,030
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Not to mention "Emma and The Creature From The Bottomless Pit".
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 03:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 06:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 03:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 07:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 03:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:47 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration