LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-26-2008, 02:42 PM   #31
ErV
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Russia
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 1,202
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 62

Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchn00b View Post
Hi,

Should we say:
Quote:
it was a long day today
or
Quote:
it has been a long day today
or
?
"IT was a long day today", IMHO.

Because when you say "it was" it means that day is already over.

"Has been" is typically used when some kind of action was continuously (I.e. "day was being long" in the past) performed during long period before the moment when you talk, but this action is finished at the moment when you talk.

At least that's how I understand it.

P.S. You should read books about times of english verbs. Ideally books should be written in your native language.

Last edited by ErV; 08-26-2008 at 02:45 PM.
 
Old 08-26-2008, 04:46 PM   #32
frenchn00b
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Location: E.U., Mountains :-)
Distribution: Debian, Etch, the greatest
Posts: 2,546

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ErV View Post
"IT was a long day today", IMHO.

Because when you say "it was" it means that day is already over.

"Has been" is typically used when some kind of action was continuously (I.e. "day was being long" in the past) performed during long period before the moment when you talk, but this action is finished at the moment when you talk.

At least that's how I understand it.

P.S. You should read books about times of english verbs. Ideally books should be written in your native language.
and if you say it at 23pm, "it has been a long day today" talkign about work from 8-17pm. It is right?
 
Old 08-26-2008, 05:19 PM   #33
ErV
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Russia
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 1,202
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchn00b View Post
and if you say it at 23pm, "it has been a long day today" talkign about work from 8-17pm. It is right?
Honestly, explaining forms of english verbs (which I use intuitively) using same forms of english verbs is a bit complicated.

Take a look at this:
http://www.whitesmoke.com/past-progressive-tense.html
http://www.lbt-languages.de/english/...lernhilfe.html

And try to find tutorials like this:
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=KtB87Z...eature=related
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=4jcJBi...eature=related

Looking at the google search results I can say that both "was long day" and "had been long day" are used.
 
Old 08-26-2008, 05:48 PM   #34
esteeven
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2001
Location: Bristol UK
Distribution: Arch Ubuntu Slackware
Posts: 1,028

Rep: Reputation: 42
It was a long day today.

This can be correct, depending on the time of day and what the speaker and listener agree to be the meaning of today. The use of the past simple (was) indicates that the "day" being referred to is over (BUT the "real" day ie the one ending at midnight) is not over because "today" would need to be referred to as "yesterday." The day being referred to could certainly be a working day or something like a day of travel. The speaker does not expect there to be more of the same activity that made the day long to follow.

It has been a hard day today.

The present perfect simple (auxiliary "have" + past participle) indicates that a period is not over. Here it means "so far" or "up until now." There is the potential for more difficulty to follow but we require more information.
 
Old 08-26-2008, 06:04 PM   #35
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
It's been a loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong day today.
 
Old 08-27-2008, 06:54 AM   #36
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
It was a loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong day yesterday.

There's your answers.
 
Old 08-27-2008, 12:16 PM   #37
gnashley
Amigo developer
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 4,776

Rep: Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481
" Quote:Originally Posted by alan_ri
Well,I think that I have the highest number of edited posts because of grammar corrections then any other member since LQ started back in 2000 ,and that's because this is international forum and we "must" use international language and I want that what I post here will make sense to whoever will read it and if I'm not careful with my english then that would not be so maybe,like sometimes when I just couldn't understand what the OP meant to say in his post.

what a long sentence ! "

If alan_ri is a German, that would be considered a pretty short sentence. I've seen longer ones where they used the split infinitive with several conditional and other clauses in between the infinitive root and its' compound part. Of course this is a no-no in English but is correct in English. I won't try to compose an example in german as I would surely botch it, but here's the wy one might go in English, using the common infinitive 'pick up':

At seven every evening, I _pick_ my wife, who works long hours in a large factory for very little money and even less thanks, and then has to come home to make supper for myself and our seven screaming children, though she has no energy left and always scolds me for not helping out more, even though I am disabled and can't help it, from work _up_.

I won't belabor the example any more, though it could still stand a few dozen words of 'fleshing out' without exagerating at all. When first learning German, this type of construction can really drive you mad. Usually one can't bear the suspense and must skip ahead to the end of the sentence to _pick up_ the other part of the verb so that the intervening ramble makes more sense, or is at least bearable.
 
Old 10-04-2008, 04:21 AM   #38
frenchn00b
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Location: E.U., Mountains :-)
Distribution: Debian, Etch, the greatest
Posts: 2,546

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 51
Hi guys,

can we say :
Code:
"I have milk untolerance ?"
it sounds strange, no?
What in us you would say... ?
 
Old 10-04-2008, 05:49 AM   #39
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I would say "I have milk intolerance", but I'd be telling a lie.
 
Old 10-04-2008, 06:36 AM   #40
WorldIsNotFair
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2008
Location: Jakarta
Distribution: CentOS 5
Posts: 89

Rep: Reputation: 17
Hello friends, my english is bad.

When typing in international forum like this, i only hope for tolerance ... hihihi

Its very hard to master english language if u don't face with it everyday.

maybe when someone post, member who knows english better should help to correct it.

so, mr BrianL from England , is there any mistake on this 5 lines ?
 
Old 10-04-2008, 07:03 AM   #41
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
WorldIsNotFair
Just a few little slip ups, but not bad.
Use you instead of u.
hahaha not hihihi.
Don't use it every day is better.
Then these:
someone posts
members who know
are there any mistakes in these 5 lines

But as long as we can get a good idea of what you mean, it doesn't have to be 100% correct. So don't worry about it. I can't speak any other languages, so you're better than me.
 
Old 10-04-2008, 12:45 PM   #42
immortaltechnique
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Location: Kenya
Distribution: Ubuntu, RHEL, OpenBSD
Posts: 287

Rep: Reputation: 32
Ill go with brianL on this one. If it sounds right, then its correct
 
Old 10-04-2008, 06:31 PM   #43
loperz7
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2008
Posts: 53

Rep: Reputation: 15
You can always use AbiWord or maybe OpenOffice - red lines are mistakes (catt instead of cat) and green lines are syntax errors (Brian have a baseball).

Debian

Last edited by loperz7; 10-10-2008 at 06:27 AM.
 
Old 10-04-2008, 10:26 PM   #44
immortaltechnique
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Location: Kenya
Distribution: Ubuntu, RHEL, OpenBSD
Posts: 287

Rep: Reputation: 32
Quote:
(Brian have a baseball)
Lol Brian can makes a great English teacher. This sort of reminds me of the spelling thread we had some time back where people wanted to become gooros and muderaturs
 
Old 10-05-2008, 08:19 AM   #45
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by immortaltechnique View Post
Lol Brian can makes a great English teacher. This sort of reminds me of the spelling thread we had some time back where people wanted to become gooros and muderaturs
You mean goorrooz and moddurraturz don't you?
My spelchekks werkin perficktlie.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 04:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 07:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 04:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 08:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 04:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:10 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration