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Old 10-21-2010, 09:09 AM   #316
H_TeXMeX_H
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Don't listen to the spell checker ... it has been wrong many times for me. The dictionary is missing words.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:31 AM   #317
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Yeah, I never take much notice of it.
I'll shut it up permanently...there, disabled.

Last edited by brianL; 10-21-2010 at 09:35 AM.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:37 AM   #318
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Testing:
afterwards, colour, emphasise
Yes. No red underlines.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:39 AM   #319
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Yeah, it's our language so we can mess it up if we want.
Well, I actually said that since Britishers have ruled India for near about 300 years and it is the British English that is considered standard here.

I have really no idea that how can a word become obsolete or change its meaning over a period of time !

and I have used the word "actually" in the above sentence ? Is it considered valid ?
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:45 AM   #320
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I have really no idea that how can a word become obsolete or change its meaning over a period of time !
Language is funny like that.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:54 AM   #321
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Originally Posted by MrCode View Post
Language is funny like that.
Then you should say "English language is funny like that" !

Since this is not the case with Hindi, every Hindi word which was spoken 1000 years back, still does convey the same meaning.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 10:08 AM   #322
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Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
Then you should say "English language is funny like that" !

Since this is not the case with Hindi, every Hindi word which was spoken 1000 years back, still does convey the same meaning.
Same with Bengali.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 10:17 AM   #323
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Yes, "actually" is actually OK there, Anisha.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 10:28 AM   #324
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Since this is not the case with Hindi, every Hindi word which was spoken 1000 years back, still does convey the same meaning.
I do not speak Hindi but, as a linguist, I would think that is extremely unlikely, if not downright impossible.

Edit: http://lrs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/avatans/hindi.html
 
Old 10-21-2010, 10:32 AM   #325
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
Since this is not the case with Hindi, every Hindi word which was spoken 1000 years back, still does convey the same meaning.
Thanks for the interesting insight.

One of the strengths of English is that it does not have a controlling body as French, German and Papal Latin do (I don't know how much notice their speakers take of the controlling bodies!) so it is a live language of the people who speak it, now many people in many countries. It is also a weakness because it has lead to an irregular language -- easy to learn the basics but hard to master -- with imprecise grammar and punctuation rules.

English went through a major evolution when it was left to the common people after the Norman Conquest in 1066 -- when the educated people spoke Latin and the court spoke French.

The common people simplified it, taking away what for them were useless features such as gender of adjectives and gender of nouns for inanimate things (one adjective is left which still takes a different spelling, depending on whether it is applied to a male or a female). They simplified pronunciation, leading to those mystifying spellings ending in "ght" because that's roughly how they were pronounced and the spelling wasn't changed.

It is this period which gave English different words for some animals and the same animal as food; sheep/mutton, pig/pork, cow/beef. The animal names are from the old English and the food names are Anglicised Norman French.

Taking words from old English (Germanic), from Latin (and later Greek), from Norman French and -- in the days of the empire and subsequent easy international travel -- from all over the world, English has built a huge vocabulary with many near-synonyms of usefully subtle different meaning.

It was not until King James commissioned an English translation of the bible that the English of the common people was blessed with official sanction and semi-regularised.

The best book about this very English English history is by an American -- Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue; English And How It Got That Way".

Last edited by catkin; 10-21-2010 at 10:34 AM. Reason: removed doubled "of", changed "regularised" to "semi-regularised"
 
Old 10-21-2010, 11:02 AM   #326
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Originally Posted by jay73 View Post
I would think that is extremely unlikely, if not downright impossible.
I have not understood the summary of this statement.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 01:37 PM   #327
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The only reason I leave FF spellcheck enabled is for words like "exercise", for some reason I have a hard time spelling this word.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 01:41 PM   #328
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Me, too: for some reason I sometimes confuse the first parts of "exercise" and "exception", so I almost type "excercise" or something like that.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 05:46 PM   #329
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
Since this is not the case with Hindi, every Hindi word which was spoken 1000 years back, still does convey the same meaning.
If this were the case, Hindi would be unique. Words change, often within a single lifetime.

Sometimes we don't notice, when reading older literature, because we make assumptions that are wrong. An English poem of 500 years ago describes a girl as being "gentle as falcon or hawk of the tower". Most modern readers would think they know what "gentle" and "tower" mean, but they'd be wrong. How gentle, in the modern sense, is a bird of prey? For Skelton, gentle meant well-bred or nobly born. Similarly a hawk of the tower was not a hawk that lived in a tower, but a hawk that towered or soared; it was just another way of saying falcon.
 
Old 10-21-2010, 09:40 PM   #330
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Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
An English poem of 500 years ago describes a girl as being "gentle as falcon or hawk of the tower". Most modern readers would think they know what "gentle" and "tower" mean, but they'd be wrong. How gentle, in the modern sense, is a bird of prey?
You have given the example of a poem ?? Poets are allowed to use Paradox, Oxymoron etc. in their statements, so obviously it is difficult to understand what they are saying. Thus it really doesn't matter if the poem was written today or 500 years back, because in the both cases it will be still difficult to guess what the author meant !!

I have no proofs but it is said that Britishers used to use "Kindly" at the beginning of most sentences 300 years back in the usual conversations and it was considered very polite at the time, but now if someone uses "Kindly" at the beginning of the statements, he'll be laughed/ridiculed at, thinking that he is trying to insult someone !!!

The same is not true with Hindi, if in usual conversations some words were considered polite 1000 years back, they will be still considered very polite even today. When I say, that the words used in Hindi still convey the same meaning as they did several years back, I say so because I have studied Hindi for 12 years in the school and thus I have read many Hindi literatures (and I am excluding poems and plays here).

But yes, if today I use the Hindi words which were used in general conversation several years back, I'll be laughed at, but not because the words/sentences have changed their meanings and impact, but because the spoilt brats of the today's generation think it is "out of fashion/style" to use the those kind Hindi words.

and please correct the grammar or the sentence formations in the above paragraph.

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 10-21-2010 at 09:42 PM.
 
  


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