LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 07-12-2008, 09:53 AM   #16
Su-Shee
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Berlin
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 509

Rep: Reputation: 41

Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchn00b View Post
I have 2 Robert dictionary in my shelf. But electronic, nope. I have lot of books ab. french, as it is obvious. Encarta and universalis are 2 very good cdroms, encyclopedia. I would recommand. Otherwise le bon usage... I can have a look.
Yes. "Le petit Robert" - very funny. 2 kilos and 9cm...

Quote:
Question:
For or Since?
"Since recent years the food industry is facing lot of demands"
or
"For recent years the food industry is facing lot of demands"
What would be the solution?

I learned at school:

"For" marks a period of time, "since" is used for something like "from this point in time on".

"For three years I tried to install Linux."
"Since 2005 I tried to install Linux."

And I would write "Ever since <point in time or imporant event> the food industry faces ... " for precision.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 12:15 PM   #17
jomen
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Leipzig/Germany
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,687

Rep: Reputation: 54
"recent years" is a rather unspecified/open period of time.
For a couple of years now the food industry ....
For quite some time now the food industry ...
would be o.k.
But I can't give a grammatical explanation.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 12:47 PM   #18
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
"For quite some time" is a bit vague, not very specific.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 01:01 PM   #19
jomen
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Leipzig/Germany
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,687

Rep: Reputation: 54
But you can say "For quite some time ..." while you shouldn't (but still can) say: "For recent years ..."
"In recent years the food industry ... " would still be better. I was trying an example with a correct use of "for".
 
Old 07-12-2008, 01:15 PM   #20
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
"For several years..." - how's that suit you?
 
Old 07-12-2008, 01:19 PM   #21
jomen
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Leipzig/Germany
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,687

Rep: Reputation: 54
Fine!
- the problem here seems to be that you are a native speaker and notice such fine differences which go "against the grain(?)" while I don't have that much experience and found it o.k.
Is that so?

[edit]
the thing that "inspired" me was this:
"We have had an eye on you for quite some time now, Mr.Anderson..."
(I hope this is nearly a quote)

Last edited by jomen; 07-12-2008 at 01:59 PM.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 02:48 PM   #22
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by jomen View Post
Fine!
- the problem here seems to be that you are a native speaker and notice such fine differences which go "against the grain(?)"
Yeah, it's not so much a matter of knowing the correct grammar as knowing instinctively when something sounds or looks right.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 03:16 PM   #23
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Lubuntu
Posts: 19,176
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430
One point I will make - my French and German are absolutely appalling and I wouldn't even attempt to post to a French or German language forum. LQ has members for whom English is a second, third or fourth language and I am constantly impressed how people who start a post with "please excuse my English...." actually write it better than many native English speakers. The little bits, like the for/since question above, come with usage and experience.

Largely, the technical forums are very forgiving. All we care about is that we can understand what you are asking and you can understand our answers. And that you don't use SMS speak.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 03:28 PM   #24
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I don't know any other languages, except for a few words and phrases.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 05:30 PM   #25
Su-Shee
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Berlin
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 509

Rep: Reputation: 41
Well, it's quite a dominate language after all, tought at school in most european countries as a mandatory subject over several years. In addition, smaller countries show TV series and movies untranslated in English with subtitles only - great way to learn.

And "Harry Potter" of course has recently brought thousands of children into written English - at least in Germany.

In many ways it's simply due to the fact that English is available through so many channels.

If I could get the same amount of movies, TV series or online dictionaries in French...
 
Old 07-12-2008, 05:38 PM   #26
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Lubuntu
Posts: 19,176
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430
My French teacher always said that we could become fluent in French if we lived there for 6 months, rather than spend 5 years in school trying to pick up on it. At one time, the international language was French - diplomats had to understand it. Now, the dominant language is English. The predominant language on the internet is English, which means that if you want to have conversations internationally you have to at least understand some of it. This will hopefully mean that non-English speakers will massively improve their English comprehension, but does nothing for those of us with English as our main language

To go back to the examples in the OP, Shakespeare actually invented many phrases which are now common - http://shakespeare.about.com/library.../aa042400a.htm

Maybe we should have language exchange threads here in General where we can teach each other to read our languages?
 
Old 07-12-2008, 07:45 PM   #27
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,140
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
A lot of people, I mean English people, can't be bothered to make the effort to understand Shakespeare - they really don't know what they're missing. Ages ago (can't be more specific), I read several books about him and his works, then read most of the plays and poems - and the more I read, the more I understood. I suppose that was akin to learning a foreign language, but one separated by time rather than geography.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 09:03 PM   #28
ErV
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Russia
Distribution: Slackware 12.2
Posts: 1,202
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP View Post
My French teacher always said that we could become fluent in French if we lived there for 6 months, rather than spend 5 years in school trying to pick up on it.
I believe I've learned serious part of my english kowledge by playing console/computer games (old titles like Fallout 2, Landstalker, Beyound Oasis, etc), although initial knowledge was acquired from books (which taught to think in foregin language instead of translating every sentence all the time).

It is a shame that many of game/video (re)publisher's are now cutting out original language from localized versions of foreign films/games. Basically, in my area finding non-pirated (and even pirated) version of something with available original language is difficult. That's bad, since today's gamers at least could learn foreign language while playing another cr@p with "good gfx".
 
Old 07-13-2008, 06:36 AM   #29
Su-Shee
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: Berlin
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 509

Rep: Reputation: 41
Well, the good thing about learning foreign languages is the same thing like learning a programming language: After you've picked up one or two, the third, fourth or fifth isn't that difficult anymore.

And things like the roman language family or translating German grammar knowledge into Icelandic or having learned all the chinese characters for Japanese once come in handy, too, because they can easily transferred from one language to another.

Just like knowing what hashes are in Perl transforms nicely into learning PHP.

So it's just hard once - the first time.
 
Old 08-26-2008, 02:29 PM   #30
frenchn00b
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Location: E.U., Mountains :-)
Distribution: Debian, Etch, the greatest
Posts: 2,546

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 51
Hi,

Should we say:

Quote:
it was a long day today
or
Quote:
it has been a long day today
?
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 04:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 07:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 04:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 08:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 04:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:04 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration