LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 06-10-2006, 04:55 AM   #46
rkelsen
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 1,808

Rep: Reputation: 234Reputation: 234Reputation: 234

Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
- IE's important to many companies' infrastructures - much more than you think.
Please explain this for those of us who don't understand what a non-standards compliant web browser could possibly contribute to business. As I see it, everything which works in IE should work in any other browser. If it doesn't, then that application is broken.

The www is becoming more standards compliant (as opposed to Microsoft compliant). This is evidenced by the lack of "sorry you're running a non-compliant browser" messages I've seen in recent years.

So, I really don't understand why anyone would be dependant upon IE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
As sad as that is. On the other hand, this spares (not only) me *lots* of work.
Now I'm confused. IE still doesn't have tabs, yet you're claiming that it increases your efficiency?
 
Old 06-10-2006, 07:44 AM   #47
Dralnu
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux
Posts: 335

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
Please explain this for those of us who don't understand what a non-standards compliant web browser could possibly contribute to business. As I see it, everything which works in IE should work in any other browser. If it doesn't, then that application is broken.

The www is becoming more standards compliant (as opposed to Microsoft compliant). This is evidenced by the lack of "sorry you're running a non-compliant browser" messages I've seen in recent years.

So, I really don't understand why anyone would be dependant upon IE.

Now I'm confused. IE still doesn't have tabs, yet you're claiming that it increases your efficiency?
I think what he means is that some companies have yet to see beyond the M$ fog that IE is a couple hundred megabytes of crap. My router and modem are support to be repaired via IE, which I "released" from my desktop, and guess what, Firefox works great to fix them.

Some bussneesses these days may use IE so they can back-hack your system and log what you do, hence their reliance on it.

Thats just my :2cents:
 
Old 06-10-2006, 07:35 PM   #48
robbbert
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Hannover, Germany
Distribution: Let there be Ubuntu... :o)
Posts: 573

Rep: Reputation: 32
I wouldn't want to produce a flamewar. Moreover, I'm one of the few Windows developers who tries to write code independant of Internet Explorer.

- Being asked for that, I'll introduce into typical tasks that have been accomplished by using Internet Explorer:

1. Embedding a HTML display component into your application (without that IE toolbars, etc.). Displaying formatted HTML (or, i.e., XML) within it. Sending commands to it, like "navigate", "back", "print preview".
Remark: With Firefox, now, something similar is possible, too. Anyways, IE provided that 5 years earlier and, moreover, Firefox' technology ain't less proprietary, in any way.
Java provides an alternative, too, but the IE control is greatly superior to that.

2. Providing a fully-fledged, WYSIWYG, HTML editor (wow! - and out-of-the-box).
Remark: Firefox (resp., the Gecko engine) now provides that feature, too, as well as Java does (see 1.).

3. Remote interaction with the server, without reloading the page. IE provided a feature called Remote Scripting as of (I think) year 2000 or 2001.
Remark: That's quite what AJAX is. At that early times, the technology already existed. What makes AJAX popular these days is not Firefox supports it, too, but there are common frameworks now to faciliate programming context menus, dynamic trees, etc.

4. HTA: HTML Applications. - These are having the file extension .hta, and they're HTML files besides from they're running in standalone windows (like EXEs), and with administrative permissions. - Most current Microsoft setup applications are HTAs - you can script most parts of them in HTML and JavaScript - but interact with C/ActiveX code or anything on the machine it's running on.

5. Not to mention what I found on companies' intranets: Anything being related to HTML, JavaScript or DHTML is clearly tailored to IE's needs. (I'm aware this was / has been an issue when no browser was standards-compliant.)

6. Using ActiveX controls (in companies' intranets).
Remark: There are also Java applets - however, ActiveX controls don't live in a sandbox, and are acting with the user's rights. As there are security risks with that, there are also advantages.

7. Inherited impersonification = integrated authentication. If you aren't sure what that means to the life of some (non-technical) employee, please don't talk back.

- My point is not to tell that using IE is desirable. It's to tell IE, in businesses, has been used extensively, and to provide (at least) some reasons why.

Before you cry out - or attack - please learn - for the sake of Linux -

and if you're missing something with your favorite browser (from the perspective of a business programmer / employee), please add it to the TODO list.

Thanks

Last edited by robbbert; 06-10-2006 at 07:39 PM.
 
Old 06-10-2006, 07:38 PM   #49
primo
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Posts: 542

Rep: Reputation: 34
I have to disagree with sundialscvs. Windows is inherently insecure. IE and all the other MS programs reach the innards of the OS more than any other software. Their trick to make then "faster" backfire because vulnerabilities in these programs compromise the whole system. If you want to secure a Windows box (only a subjective perception because the OS doesn't help to make this stuff deterministic), then block all Internet access to MS programs, disable plugins in IE and use tripwire to protect your executables and an antivirus to protect new data. I'm currently compiling the new KDE 3.5.3 in FreeBSD 6.1 and all I can say is that speed and stability I get from Unix systems is impossible with Windows. Both the new versions of qt and arts as well as kdelibs and kdebase integrate perfectly with the old 3.5.1 apps still installed and even this KOffice behemoth is behaving well. With Windows I can't never be sure of anything. If anyone thinks that by hiding details of what's going on plays something in this perception, then use either MacOS or Windows. A 100% Linux distro for me would be a mix between the stability of Debian and the source based philosophy of Gentoo (portage lacks speed).
 
Old 06-10-2006, 08:09 PM   #50
Dralnu
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux
Posts: 335

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Getting slightly off-topic: Only problem with Debian is that their stable release (and testing somewhat I think) are dated. It would take a small army to keep something like Debian, or any *nix-based OS for that matter, up to date while still maintaining a nearly flawlessly working system. I've recently switched to Gentoo, so I know to a point Portage's speed. It does have its problems (Why emerge cann't upload the last package list as a pack.list file is beyond me to speed up search), the time-consuming part isn't with Gentoo, but with your compiler/computer. Compiling everything from source is a HUGE task for any PC (especially with things like KDE/Gnome, and OOo), so you have to be willing to sit there in KDE/Gnome watching a compile scroll by while watching your favorite forums.

As for robberts comment, IE was, for a moment, something good, but with the rise of other browsers such as Firefox and Opera, making an IE-based app is a growingly annoying job on the users end, especially for Linux users.
Not saying you are this, the fact you say you try to make browser-independend apps is a great thing, and I applaud that, but alot of programmers are lazy (at least in the Windows community. The Linux community doesn't seem to take well to poorly created software), and hence instead of doing some for of work, they decide that since 90% of the market has IE, they go on and make apps that rely on IE features (or lack there of) to minimize their coding work (Personally, I think a new compiler that can expand code from libraries/dll files into a more-or-less OS independent system would help with this, but thats something M$ will NOT allow if they can do ANYTHING about it), and hence more or less forcing the use of an outdated and (IMHO) useless pile of binary that someone slaps a version number and name on, when it cann't even come close to matching what other browsers are capable of (I mean, come on. Tabs is something pretty much anything in Linux has if opening multiple docs would be something one would do).

But, thats my worth on both previous post.
 
Old 06-10-2006, 08:57 PM   #51
rkelsen
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 1,808

Rep: Reputation: 234Reputation: 234Reputation: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
I wouldn't want to produce a flamewar.
I understand that. My question was genuine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
2. Providing a fully-fledged, WYSIWYG, HTML editor (wow! - and out-of-the-box).
Surely you jest. Netscape had this first.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
6. Using ActiveX controls.

7. Inherited impersonification = integrated authentication.
ROFL

If security holes like these aren't enough reason to not use IE, then I don't know what is.

There is an open source alternative to every reason for using IE contained in your post. This has nothing to do with Linux. Open source is far greater than just Linux. Open your eyes and see.
 
Old 06-10-2006, 08:58 PM   #52
primo
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Posts: 542

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dralnu
Getting slightly off-topic: Only problem with Debian is that their stable release (and testing somewhat I think) are dated. It would take a small army to keep something like Debian, or any *nix-based OS for that matter, up to date while still maintaining a nearly flawlessly working system. I've recently switched to Gentoo, so I know to a point Portage's speed. It does have its problems (Why emerge cann't upload the last package list as a pack.list file is beyond me to speed up search), the time-consuming part isn't with Gentoo, but with your compiler/computer. Compiling everything from source is a HUGE task for any PC (especially with things like KDE/Gnome, and OOo), so you have to be willing to sit there in KDE/Gnome watching a compile scroll by while watching your favorite forums.
Not quite. Minor versions usually don't break the API and binary compatibility is somewhat guaranteed. With KDE is easy to skip what you don't need. Compiling from sources when you dual boot between Unixes saves you from downloading binary packages for everything. In my case I'm running Gentoo and NetBSD besides FreeBSD. There's no "pain" when things work predictably and in any case I can rollback to the binaries provided by both BSD's and, in the case of Gentoo 2006.0, Gnome. The things I use in KDE (everything except kdeaccessibility, kdevelop, kdesdk, kdewebdev, kdepim and kdetoys) takes like 24 hours in a Pentium 4 1.7Ghz while browsing the web and listening to MP3's. Unix means putting a computer to good use. What do the Microsoft guys want ? A web-integrated multimedia box you can't tamper with. The same with Apple. They all build stuff destined to the trash bin.

On Portage: It makes Gentoo not ideal to install on old boxes.
 
Old 06-10-2006, 09:14 PM   #53
Dralnu
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux
Posts: 335

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by primo
Not quite. Minor versions usually don't break the API and binary compatibility is somewhat guaranteed. With KDE is easy to skip what you don't need. Compiling from sources when you dual boot between Unixes saves you from downloading binary packages for everything. In my case I'm running Gentoo and NetBSD besides FreeBSD. There's no "pain" when things work predictably and in any case I can rollback to the binaries provided by both BSD's and, in the case of Gentoo 2006.0, Gnome. The things I use in KDE (everything except kdeaccessibility, kdevelop, kdesdk, kdewebdev, kdepim and kdetoys) takes like 24 hours in a Pentium 4 1.7Ghz while browsing the web and listening to MP3's. Unix means putting a computer to good use. What do the Microsoft guys want ? A web-integrated multimedia box you can't tamper with. The same with Apple. They all build stuff destined to the trash bin.

On Portage: It makes Gentoo not ideal to install on old boxes.
No, its not. I understand the compile times, too. I've slept while compiling OOo (maybe not the SMARTEST thing, but I have been sick with a summer cold recently), and have a p4 2.53Gh w/ 512M RAM, this is also in CLI and using CenterICQ (IMHO, CenterICQ is a very good CLI-based chat client, with a few minor bugs in it).

Compiling is a system-intensive proccess, and if you don't want to spend hours compiling, then I'd suggest something like SuSe, Debian, and since if you use Gentoo, I suspect you don't mind learning your OS, Slackware.

I used SuSe with plenty of joy, though the package system to be a bit narrow in some aspects, but its a proprietary system, and is easy to install.

Getting farther off topic: What would you suggest for a router/server for an at-home network w/ a linux machine and a Windows machine on it? I've got a Netgear router atm, but would prefer to use something I have more control over (I think we might could be able to label that as "Linux-itis"). Also, I'd like to be able to keep track of what goes in and out of the Windows box (Big Brothering, I know, but I want to keep track of it for various reasons)
 
Old 06-10-2006, 09:48 PM   #54
primo
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Posts: 542

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dralnu
No, its not. I understand the compile times, too.
[...]
Compiling is a system-intensive proccess, and if you don't want to spend hours compiling, then I'd suggest something like SuSe, Debian, and since if you use Gentoo, I suspect you don't mind learning your OS, Slackware.
The problem with Portage is that it's based on Python, an interpreted language. Simple stuff like printing a list of installed packages is unaceptably slow on old machines.

Quote:
I used SuSe with plenty of joy, though the package system to be a bit narrow in some aspects, but its a proprietary system, and is easy to install.
I used Mandrake and Redhat from 5.2 to 7.0. RPM's are very awkward. With Mandrake it was a pain because they don't provide RPM's for yacc/bison which are essential to compile stuff like tcpdump, as well as many others such as m4 and the devel rpms which contain the headers for openssl, libpcap, etc. Source RPM's should be customizable as in source based distros.

Another problem with Gentoo: Hardened Gentoo isn't obvious to get right. Many distributions ship different kernels without the need of many versions of different parts of the system matching them. As a result, the Linux kernel in distributions like Mandrake may be more secure than the standard vanilla and gentoo sources that are an option with Gentoo. But anyway the speed issue in Portage and this isn't a big deal because they're on good track and Gentoo is the way to go.

Quote:
Getting farther off topic: What would you suggest for a router/server for an at-home network w/ a linux machine and a Windows machine on it? I've got a Netgear router atm, but would prefer to use something I have more control over (I think we might could be able to label that as "Linux-itis"). Also, I'd like to be able to keep track of what goes in and out of the Windows box (Big Brothering, I know, but I want to keep track of it for various reasons)
You can do that on an "old" PC you don't use with either Linux or BSD. For firewalling, you have 3 choices in FreeBSD: ipfw, ipfilter and PF. The share some rule syntax similarities that is very easy to understand. Iptables is more sophisticated in what you can do with the stateful filtering. Linux and *BSD's can be trimmed down by compiling the kernel and they all support kernel modules. If in doubt, try them all.
 
Old 06-10-2006, 11:37 PM   #55
Dralnu
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux
Posts: 335

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by primo
The problem with Portage is that it's based on Python, an interpreted language. Simple stuff like printing a list of installed packages is unaceptably slow on old machines.
Granted. It might be a good idea to make it another package in itself, and even the Gentoo devs will admit Portage is aging (if memory serves me, that is), but right now for what they are doing, its works, people know it, and until they get something solid out (probably a rewrite with backwards catability with older versions of Portage), its what they will use. Personally, I kinda like it, but emerge --searchdesc <string> is slllloooowwwww, and emerge --search <string> isn't that much faster when things are figured.


Quote:
Originally Posted by primo
I used Mandrake and Redhat from 5.2 to 7.0. RPM's are very awkward. With Mandrake it was a pain because they don't provide RPM's for yacc/bison which are essential to compile stuff like tcpdump, as well as many others such as m4 and the devel rpms which contain the headers for openssl, libpcap, etc. Source RPM's should be customizable as in source based distros.
RPMs are user-friendly, and are nice for new users. They take alot of guesswork out of compiling and basic installs, although it does cause problems, and is awkward. I'm not defending RPMs, but they do have their up sides, as well as their downside, but everything does.

Quote:
Originally Posted by primo
Another problem with Gentoo: Hardened Gentoo isn't obvious to get right. Many distributions ship different kernels without the need of many versions of different parts of the system matching them. As a result, the Linux kernel in distributions like Mandrake may be more secure than the standard vanilla and gentoo sources that are an option with Gentoo. But anyway the speed issue in Portage and this isn't a big deal because they're on good track and Gentoo is the way to go.
They have and HOWTO for hardening Gentoo I beleive (as well as a file you can incorporate into your FEATURES variable) that will get you started, although the work on hardening is as much configuration as it is programming, but thats from my knowledge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by primo
You can do that on an "old" PC you don't use with either Linux or BSD. For firewalling, you have 3 choices in FreeBSD: ipfw, ipfilter and PF. The share some rule syntax similarities that is very easy to understand. Iptables is more sophisticated in what you can do with the stateful filtering. Linux and *BSD's can be trimmed down by compiling the kernel and they all support kernel modules. If in doubt, try them all.
Thanks for the info. I don't have a PC to do that with just yet (soon I will, hopefully). Personally, from what I've seen OpenBSD or FreeBSD are seeming like two very good choices (OpenBSD seems to have a philosophy of security first, usablity second, though I could be wrong).
 
Old 06-10-2006, 11:48 PM   #56
primo
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Posts: 542

Rep: Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dralnu
Personally, from what I've seen OpenBSD or FreeBSD are seeming like two very good choices (OpenBSD seems to have a philosophy of security first, usablity second, though I could be wrong).
I prefer FreeBSD. It has PF (Packet Filter) and OpenSSH from OpenBSD. BSD's are said to be cross-polinated, but FreeBSD and NetBSD are the most active. FreeBSD (since 6.0) now has read support for ReiserFS. NetBSD claims to better use ext2 than Linux itself in the handbook (something FreeBSD 5.x at least can't claim). A definitely good feature is that both can run binaries from Linux, Solaris and other BSD's. It happens through an emulation layer (mostly kernel 2.4.x based) and libraries that you can grab from an existing Linux installation or the SuSE rpm's by default. This way you can run flash and java (now supported natively in FreeBSD).

Last edited by primo; 06-10-2006 at 11:52 PM.
 
Old 06-11-2006, 02:17 PM   #57
robbbert
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Hannover, Germany
Distribution: Let there be Ubuntu... :o)
Posts: 573

Rep: Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
2. Providing a fully-fledged, WYSIWYG, HTML editor (wow! - and out-of-the-box).
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
Surely you jest. Netscape had this first.
You mean Netscape Composer. At the time it came up, there'd been MS Frontpage already, adding project management and other utilities to pure WYSIWYG HTML editing (both still aren't used by professionals - apart from the advanced Dreamweaver (on Windows)).

Anyways, that's not my point. - My point is to explain the various ways Internet Explorer has been customized, and has been used as a kind of library or control. - I.e., while there was Netscape Composer, this was a standalone application. At most (if C plugins were even possible at that time) plugins were possible. In contrast, as a programmer, you could embed Internet Explorer into Visual Basic, C, HTML, ..., applications - like nowadays, you can do with the Gecko engine - with a still limited number of languages.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
7. Inherited impersonification = integrated authentication.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
ROFL

If security holes like these aren't enough reason to not use IE, then I don't know what is.
You're appearing to see a security hole in Integrated Authentication. You're wrong.

"Integrated authentication" means, you log on when you boot the computer. Next, you connect to remote servers within your business network several times a day, and you don't need to re-authenticate.

Let me tell you, this a knock-out criteria in requirement specifications for business use. - Normal employees would be overwhelmed when remembering (different) passwords 30 times a day: Logging on with their LDAP account at the begin of their daily session must suffice.

You might throw in, LDAP ain't a Microsoft thing, and that's right. Anyways, they're the only ones who enabled that by default, without any programmer's interaction. - In Java, you can use JAAS for that but that's a lot of programming effort and also this hasn't been comfortably been around 5 years ago.

I'm not sure as for the alternatives, like, doing Integrated Authentication with Python.

You'll probably tell me how to implement a HTML editor with company rules, that can save back data to the company's server without a password box popping up. I mean, a 15-liner of code, not a 5000-liner.

Thanks
 
Old 06-11-2006, 08:32 PM   #58
Dralnu
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Distribution: Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux
Posts: 335

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
With an understanding my network knowledge is limited, using a one-time authentication can be secure, but only if there is a limted amount of access done to the Internet. Any network created on a Windows framework will be insecure by comparison to one thats *nix/*BSD based, just because of the OS it is running.

A good firewall (preferably series there of) could make things fairly secure, but anything that is online is vulnerable, but rkelson does have a point to a point, in that one-time authentication isn't the MOST secure you can be, but then again, alot of companies don't have information that needs that much security from the average white-collar worker (accounting, yeah. Give them their own LAN, and then use a removeable HD to transfer data manually, and keeping them as secure as you can get).
 
Old 06-11-2006, 08:47 PM   #59
rkelsen
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 1,808

Rep: Reputation: 234Reputation: 234Reputation: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
At the time it came up, there'd been MS Frontpage already
And Frontpage was part of a $500 per seat extra. Netscape composer was free.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
You're appearing to see a security hole in Integrated Authentication. You're wrong.
If there aren't any security holes in Microsoft's implementation of it, I'll eat my hat.

On the Unix side, Kerberos has been around since the mid 1980s. And it's open source software.

http://web.mit.edu/kerberos/www/krb5...uide.html#SEC2

Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
Logging on with their LDAP account at the begin of their daily session must suffice.
Shot yourself in the foot. LDAP is also open source software.
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbbert
You'll probably tell me how to implement a HTML editor with company rules, that can save back data to the company's server without a password box popping up.
Sorry, you'll need to be more specific here because that sounds like a trivially easy task.
 
Old 06-12-2006, 05:18 PM   #60
robbbert
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Hannover, Germany
Distribution: Let there be Ubuntu... :o)
Posts: 573

Rep: Reputation: 32
rkelsen, we're going into details while there is a basic difference of opinions between us.
My point - as a Windows developper, mostly programming for companies' internal networks, is that making use of Internet Explorer in homogenous landscapes has been quite useful (that's the thesis), and I gave examples from my own experience and knowledge.

Most of the things you tell me I already know... I think the problem is, you're not developping for business users...
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
And Frontpage was part of a $500 per seat extra. Netscape composer was free.
$500? - Anyway, that's not a point actually as both applications could not be embedded into other, custom applications, like they're typical to business applications.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
If there aren't any security holes in Microsoft's implementation of [Integrated Authentication], I'll eat my hat.
Personally, I've heard of none. Of course, there were some but anyways, this is much more secure than Basic Authentication which is still the normal case on non-Windows operating systems.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
On the Unix side, Kerberos has been around since the mid 1980s. And it's open source software.
You tell me. I'm aware Microsoft didn't invent that. - The thing is, there doesn't seem to exist any actual implementation of Integrated Authentication (also called "single-sign-on") in the non-Windows world. I.e., Java had JAAS for that but it was almost as complicated as CORBA. Just recently, they improved those libraries. That said, that's Java! I wouldn't even want to imagine how to implement that in C or Python!

Remember, with Microsoft it's a no-liner of code to have an employee sign-on at boot time, only, and after that, he can reuse his identity without being prompted again for a password.
In some projects I did that was a knock-out requirement, BTW.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
Shot yourself in the foot. LDAP is also open source software.
See above.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen
Sorry, you'll need to be more specific [with customizing an HTML editor] because that sounds like a trivially easy task.
When you click a button in an external application, the - customized - HTML editor should appear, consisting of nothing but the editor pane, a "bold" button and a "save" button. When the "save" button is clicked, there should be no file chooser dialog but the calling application would receive an "on_save" event, and would retrieve a property "html_to_save". Nothing more.
 
  


Reply

Tags
brother, compile, gentoo, router


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best distro of Linux for my Pentium 100 mhz w/16mb ram dave247 Linux - Laptop and Netbook 3 04-16-2006 08:05 AM
100 Euros for a Distro with sound problems??? !!! Rodotheos Suse/Novell 5 09-24-2005 09:28 PM
distro for Pentium 100 for net browse & open office? spudler Linux - Distributions 5 04-09-2005 11:41 PM
Xircom CreditCard 10/100 CE3-10/100 driver not loaded under FEDORA or RHEL androphag Linux - Laptop and Netbook 1 02-06-2005 02:35 AM
RBEM56G-100 Xircom RealPort Cardbus Ethernet 10/100+Model 56 Linux Drivers/ Phalk sxa Linux - Laptop and Netbook 1 06-12-2004 12:20 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:38 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration