LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-14-2004, 04:21 PM   #1
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: 0
Linux for Life?


Hey everyone,

Im a Linux newbie and really want to get to know the OS, because I have a website at TechBoards.net and if people started asking questions on the OS id really like to answer their questions (or else I could send them here anyway).

I recently posted an article on the site where Linux is introduced to beginners, to people who may be interested in changing from the Windows OS, but it is written from a beginner's point of view as I do not know much about the OS myself.

What I want to know is, is it actually possible to completely convert from Windows to Linux? Also, which is the best version of Linux to use in your opinion?
 
Old 03-14-2004, 04:30 PM   #2
Brane Ded
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: over there
Distribution: Debian Testing
Posts: 191

Rep: Reputation: 30
Re: Linux for Life?

Quote:
Originally posted by sci0x

What I want to know is, is it actually possible to completely convert from Windows to Linux? Also, which is the best version of Linux to use in your opinion?
If I can do it, anyone can. I recommend Fedora or Mandrake to beginners. I haven't tried Suse, but I hear good things, but only if you're willing to pay. If you want to hear my somewhat biased opinion on the best distro period, I'd have to say Slackware. Of course, that's just my opinion, and I'll admit that Slack isn't the best distro for a beginner.

Your number one problem, though, will be trying to find Linux replacements for your favorite Windows programs. There are plenty of those around, though.

If you have more specific questions, ask away. And keep spreading the good word about Linux.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 04:53 PM   #3
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Ok, thanks for the help. I have been searching, and I have actually found a lot of programs to replace my Windows ones. I am thinking of buying a second computer (a cheap one) and putting Linux on that so i'll still have both Windows and Linux whenever i need them.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 05:01 PM   #4
Pauli
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Montreal
Distribution: Gentoo/Debian
Posts: 365

Rep: Reputation: 30
Dual boot It will solve all your problems
 
Old 03-14-2004, 05:09 PM   #5
Capt_Caveman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 3,658

Rep: Reputation: 57
Might want to try a cd-rom based linux distribution like Knoppix. Just burn it onto a CD and set your BIOS to boot from cdrom. That will let you test out linux without having to touch your Windows partitions. If you like it, you can switch to a more permanent solution. Check out www.distrowatch.com for a pretty comprehensive list.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 05:24 PM   #6
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I would dual-boot, only i've only 40GB on my current disc which is nearly all used up.

Yes, i think knoppix would be better. Or else i'll download Mandrake 9.2 which is three discs each 600MB.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 05:58 PM   #7
bigjohn
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2002
Location: UK - South Coast.
Distribution: Ubuntu (usually the latest....)
Posts: 2,672
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 45
The knoppix option is good. Because it should detect most, if not all of your hardware.

There's also the option of installing to hard drive. But don't be fooled by the fact that it's only 1 cd of nearly 700 meg's. It uses an excellent compression system that will unpack to nearly 1.7 gig's i.e. about the same as mandrake.


Personally, I'd vet through the stuff you've got under windows i.e. either bin it or burn it to disc and then partition the disc into 2 - 20 for windows and 20 for linux, that's what I did to start with. 40 gigs worth of windows stuff is a lot!

there's also the option to get another hard disc and install it on the second ide channel and keep that just for linux

or if you haven't got one, buy a burner and go for the first option.

Oh, and doing a hard disc install of knoppix is nearly as easy as installing mandrake - the difference being that mandrake is rpm based, knoppix is debian based, and you get a full debian system up and runnig without the stress of configuring a "proper" debian system. You also get the debian "apt-get" package managing system, which I feel is better than rpm (or even mandrakes enhance rpm system called urpmi). debian have something in the region of 10000 different packages available.

So it's really up to you.

Hope this helps a little.

regards

john
 
Old 03-14-2004, 06:31 PM   #8
Brane Ded
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: over there
Distribution: Debian Testing
Posts: 191

Rep: Reputation: 30
Holy evil! You have almost 40 gigs of Windows stuff? Kill the bloat.

Dual booting's okay, but what happened to the "completely convert from Windows to Linux" idea? I thought you were on to something there. It may sound like a harsh move, but what better way to teach a bird how to fly than to push it out of the nest?

C'mon, you can do it.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 06:41 PM   #9
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks for the advice bigjohn, i will probly end up getting a 2nd hard drive and dedicating that to Linux.

And Braneded, completely converting is a big step. I would like to get used to using Linux, and see for myself whether I would like to completely change. I think i will end up using both unless i see a huge significant change. I could never leave XP im afraid.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 07:14 PM   #10
ima
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Pennsylvania
Distribution: Suse 9.1 Pro & Smoothwall 2.0
Posts: 80

Rep: Reputation: 15
Re: SuSE - I am a former Windows only person, and I jumped in with SuSE 9.0. I tried Redhat back at version 5, and I tried Mandrake 9.2 (which I could not install sucessfully) before settling on SuSE.

No, you do not have to pay for it. The following is from the SuSE web page:
Quote:
SUSE offers the possibility to install SUSE LINUX free of charge directly from the FTP server. The function scope of FTP versions is virtually the same as that of the "normal" version. Merely a few program packages have been excluded due to license reasons. The installation support is not included either.
Here is the link to the mirrors (scroll down to the bottom for US mirrors):

SuSE Linux Mirror Sites

If you have broadband, you can download the entire mirror and then use it to setup your PC locally. SuSE provides a boot.iso to burn that boots the system, and then installs the OS. You can select a different source for the install point. For my first install, I downloaded the i386 directory and subdirectory on my Windows box, then shared the folder to everyone. When I booted using the boot ISO, I was able to connect to the network (SMB) share and install across the LAN.

You only need to purchase the software if you want CDs without the trouble of compling installation ISOs for yourself. And if you are running a non-Intel architechture, the ISOs ARE available for free.

BTW - I find SuSE to be a no brainer. It is so windows-esque with the default KDE desktop, you will be able to do about anything you can do in windows. Change the desktop? Right click and select properties. Access programs? Click the button where the windows start menu is, and voila!

Try it, you'll like it!

Last edited by ima; 03-14-2004 at 07:21 PM.
 
Old 03-14-2004, 07:32 PM   #11
2damncommon
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Calif, USA
Distribution: Debian Wheezy
Posts: 2,838

Rep: Reputation: 48
Quote:
...completely converting is a big step. I would like to get used to using Linux, and see for myself whether I would like to completely change.
You get a big 10 out of 10 for a wise choice there.
I find it unbelieveable how often this is missed.
That is, of course, the easiest way to learn a new operating system and the best way to see if it does what you want.
Good Luck.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 09:08 AM   #12
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Ok i will ima.
Sure when you download the iso you only have to put it onto a disc to make it work, isn't it?
 
Old 03-15-2004, 10:03 AM   #13
ima
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Pennsylvania
Distribution: Suse 9.1 Pro & Smoothwall 2.0
Posts: 80

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally posted by sci0x
Sure when you download the iso you only have to put it onto a disc to make it work, isn't it?
You need to burn it to a cd using something like Nero, or any other software that can read ISO files.

Check this page for instructions.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 10:37 AM   #14
sci0x
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Rathmore, Co. Kerry
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Yep i know, i have Nero 6 Ultra Edition so that should do.
 
Old 03-15-2004, 12:40 PM   #15
vasudevadas
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Bedford, UK
Distribution: Slackware 11.0, LFS 6.1
Posts: 519

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by sci0x
And Braneded, completely converting is a big step. I would like to get used to using Linux, and see for myself whether I would like to completely change. I think i will end up using both unless i see a huge significant change. I could never leave XP im afraid.
Ah, don't let the FUD get to you! When I was looking for a machine, I was interested in Linux and I found a place that would sell me a laptop with no preinstalled OS. I was tempted, but I thought I ought to get Windows.....just in case. My friend at work told me "that's exactly what they want you to think!" and I thought about it and decided to take a leap of faith.

So, my laptop has never had Windows on it, and nor will it ever. Have I looked back since? Have I FECK!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Serious questions about life ( or better the life of a programmer) alaios Programming 11 10-04-2005 11:37 AM
windows, good battery life -> fedora, bad battery life daedalusq1115 Linux - Laptop and Netbook 1 01-17-2005 06:40 AM
Linux save my life nldw General 3 10-06-2004 11:13 AM
Half Life on linux? Jestrik Linux - Games 9 01-13-2004 08:10 AM
Half Life for Linux? r_jensen11 Linux - Software 6 09-07-2003 01:12 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:25 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration