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-   -   how can I be sure my DVD/CD drive is failing? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/general-10/how-can-i-be-sure-my-dvd-cd-drive-is-failing-4175443512/)

newbiesforever 12-30-2012 06:01 PM

how can I be sure my DVD/CD drive is failing?
 
I think my DVD drive is failing: it's increasingly failing to burn discs properly burn discs, and it's often slow to respond to the eject button. I'd rather not assume it needs replacement and get rid of it. Is there any program that can analyze it and tell me if anything's wrong with it?

kareempharmacist 12-31-2012 04:49 AM

this help may help you
http://freecode.com/projects/cdck
another option is to burn a disc and compare md5 checksums of the cd and the files on the hard disk

kareempharmacist 12-31-2012 05:00 AM

To simply see if a drive can be read, you can use dd(1). This will read in the contents of the CDROM and will ignore/discard the data (note that the CDROM device may have another name on your system):

Code:

dd if=/dev/cdrom of=/dev/null
from this link
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questi...tool-for-linux

kareempharmacist 12-31-2012 05:02 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisi...ng_software%29

kareempharmacist 12-31-2012 05:08 AM

http://downloads.sourceforge.net/inq...ve-3.0-x86.iso

kareempharmacist 12-31-2012 05:13 AM

what you are searching for is benchmarking software for Linux and this is what I searched for in Google" using the the following keywords "linux cd-rom benchmark"
good luck

newbiesforever 12-31-2012 03:11 PM

Thank you. Hmm...cdck (which I used a long time ago and had forgotten about) and dd seem to be analyzing the disc in the drive rather than analyzing the drive, so I'll try this Inquisitor program.

cascade9 01-01-2013 05:16 AM

Software that will burn then analyse the burnt CD/DVD can help figure out if the CD/DVD burning and reading lasers and OK or not (BTW, you'll need to burn at least one CD and one DVD as they have different writing and reading lasers). IMO its easiest to just use a normal burning program and verify the data after the burn.

That wont help you find out if the eject machanism is bad or not.

IMO with CD/DVD burners being avaible for $25 US or less is easier to replace drives with any issues rather than spending time trying to find testing/benchmarking software (which wont really do what you want anyway).

H_TeXMeX_H 01-01-2013 10:15 AM

Burn a disk and then use 'cmp' to compare the iso to the burned image. It should say 'EOF on dvd.iso', which means that everything was identical (except for padding on the burned image).

sundialsvcs 01-01-2013 06:23 PM

Drives aren't expensive. If you think it might be failing, replace the damm thing. :)

moxieman99 01-01-2013 08:57 PM

Hold on. The OP asked if the burner was failing, which implies an intermittent failure, so tests of specific burns may not reveal a problem, which is unreliability. That involves probability analysis.

OP, how often are your burns failing? Are you doing/using anything diiferent comparing successful and unsucessful burns?

Sundial hit the nail on the head.

newbiesforever 01-02-2013 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moxieman99 (Post 4860964)
Hold on. The OP asked if the burner was failing, which implies an intermittent failure, so tests of specific burns may not reveal a problem, which is unreliability. That involves probability analysis.

OP, how often are your burns failing? Are you doing/using anything diiferent comparing successful and unsucessful burns?

Sundial hit the nail on the head.

I would say every other burn fails. I know Sundial was right that drives are cheap, but if I made this post in the first place, that suggests I can't necessarily run out and replace parts on suspicion of failure. Times are hard.

gnashley 01-02-2013 12:01 PM

Have you tried simply slowing down the burn speed?

moxieman99 01-02-2013 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by newbiesforever (Post 4861311)
I would say every other burn fails. I know Sundial was right that drives are cheap, but if I made this post in the first place, that suggests I can't necessarily run out and replace parts on suspicion of failure. Times are hard.

1. As another suggested, slow down burn speeds.

2. Examine your discs. Are some dirty/smudged/stored in sunlight/damaged? Could that explain your failure rates?

3. When did you start getting such a high failure rate? What changed immediately before then (Girlfriend dump vacuum lint into computer as a protest of your time wasting? You dropped the computer? You got new burner software?)?

4. Are you doing something else with the computer while burning that you weren't doing before? That could lead to buffer under runs and such. Compare what your computer is running/doing during successful burns as opposed to failures.

5. There are cleaning discs out there. Try one.

Quakeboy02 01-05-2013 10:39 AM

If you want to "be sure" your drive is failing, hit it with a hammer. =) Couldn't resist. But, seriously, just replace it. DVD drives don't cost enough to spend a lot of time and anguish on.


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