LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   General (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/general-10/)
-   -   High speed internet & Linux? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/general-10/high-speed-internet-and-linux-155937/)

gulo 03-10-2004 01:25 PM

High speed internet & Linux?
 
Right now, Iím still in dial-up land, running an external 56K on a box with Redhat 9. While I notice a speed increase since I switched from windows with a winmodem, Iím getting sick of the dial-up since its limiting my software options with Linux.

I used to run DSL through Qwest, back when I was still running windows, but dear god what a pain in the butt that was. The charges were pretty high, essentially triple billing for whatís really a single service. They charged basic rate for my phone line, even though I only used the line for DSL (make all calls on my cell), then they also charged for DSL on top of that..but wait theirs more...they also charged for ISP service!!!! So, I was getting triple billed for a decent connection but the customer service absolutely sucked. It took them two to three weeks to make any changes!!!! I donít want to go back to Qwest, and they donít support Linux anyway...

So, what other high speed internet options are there for use with Linux?

Anyone use a cable modem? If so, how was the set-up with Linux? Did the cable company support Linux? What was the cost in your area?

Has anyone tried mini-dish high speed internet?

My goal I to get rid of my phone line entirely.

watashiwaotaku7 03-10-2004 01:36 PM

broadband is no problem, whether a company specifically supports linux or not doesnt matter, its nice when they do but only entirely irrelevant, all that is important is that your modem be it cable or dsl supports an RJ-45 connection (cat5 or networking all synonymous for general purposes) from there just plug the cable into a network card (you will want one as they are much more reliable and easier to set up than usb networking) from there use your distros networking utilities to set up the connection or use dhcpcd eth0 if your ISP requires you to pay for each IP adress on your network then simply get a router and a switch so that the router is the only client requiring an IP from your ISP any other problems and you will have to find a HOWTO or guide of which there are plenty to choose from on google

edit
mini-dish will most likely be the same sort of deal, however you may run into problems if you also require a phone connection for upstream connections because I believe that it is possible to set up your connections as eth0 and eth1 in order to send incoming data out eth1 and outgoing through eth0, it may even be easier than windows, the mini-dish problem may be a candidate for the networking forum
/edit

Melkor 03-10-2004 01:50 PM

I've had cable internet for four and a half years. It's inexpensive (in my area, mostly because there is plenty of competition as far as ISPs go), very reliable, and fast.

As far as "supporting Linux" goes, most ISPs will tell you "we don't support Linux".

What that means is that their technicians and customer service people won't be able to read their dummy-instructions on how to set up DHCP or TCP/IP that they have printed out in their hand to you if you use something other than Windows.

But that doesn't mean that cable won't work if you are using Linux. It just means that you'll have to figure out how to set it up yourself.

And believe me... if you are savvy enough to get a Winmodem to work in Linux, you can set up a cable internet connection in Linux. It's a snap.

Melkor 03-10-2004 01:54 PM

I just noticed you're in Minnesota, gulo. What part are you in?

I can say that most areas of Minnesota that offer any kind of broadband are pretty reasonably priced where cable internet is concerned. In the St. Cloud area alone (and the surrounding rural area) there is Charter, Astound, and US Cable, all three of whom offering broadband cable internet access, all three for around the same ballpark amount per month (we pay $40 a month, and that includes cable modem rental).

The other thing all three have in common is the fact that all three are 100% utterly inept when it comes to support. You're kind of on your own regardless of what OS you're using. I've heard that Comcast is about as bad, though I can't speak from experience on that one.

Heck, I called my current ISP (one of those three) and asked them about web space and it took me twenty minutes of explaining things to TWO different support people before they even knew WTF I was talking about. :rolleyes:

gulo 03-10-2004 02:56 PM

Hi Melkor, Hi watashiwaotaku7,

Iím just down I-94 from ya in St. Paul over by Como Lake. :)

There sure seems to be a lot of people using Linux here in the MN / WI area. I noticed another guy from Rienlander here on another thread & was surprised to find out that most of the guys I know over at the U of MN are running Linux at home in some way shape or form.

Looks as if I have all of one choice in St. Paul, that being Comcast. Price wise, with ďspecialsĒ and such, look like Iíd be paying ~ $70 / mo. for digital cable & internet combo. All in all, that seems pretty reasonable since I could get rid of my dish, Qwest phone service & dial-up ISP. Iíll have to look at the numbers, but I think I might just end up saving money and get high speed internet to boot.
As it is right now, I think Iím paying ~ $40/mo just for dial up service when you consider the dedicated phone line.

So, setting up broadband on Linux is pretty much plug-n-chug? I think Iíve got ethernet integrated into my motherboard. I just dropped a new motherboard into my box a few weeks back, so Iíll have to check on the particulars as to the type of connection. Is RJ-45 the oversized phone cord looking connector?

Melkor 03-10-2004 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by gulo
Hi Melkor, Hi watashiwaotaku7,

Iím just down I-94 from ya in St. Paul over by Como Lake. :)

Cool! Not too far. I'm actually about 15 minutes outside of St Cloud, out in the country, but even out here we have broadband these days. ;)
Quote:

There sure seems to be a lot of people using Linux here in the MN / WI area. I noticed another guy from Rienlander here on another thread & was surprised to find out that most of the guys I know over at the U of MN are running Linux at home in some way shape or form.
It's steadily gaining momentum everywhere... it was really only a couple of years ago and average folks had never even heard of this thing called "Linux".

Now I encounter people my grandmother's age asking me if it's a viable alternative to XP for someone who just wants to be able to surf the internet and send/receive emails on their flaky Windows ME box. That, if nothing else, tells me that it's going to be coming into its own soon.
Quote:

Looks as if I have all of one choice in St. Paul, that being Comcast. Price wise, with ďspecialsĒ and such, look like Iíd be paying ~ $70 / mo. for digital cable & internet combo. All in all, that seems pretty reasonable since I could get rid of my dish, Qwest phone service & dial-up ISP. Iíll have to look at the numbers, but I think I might just end up saving money and get high speed internet to boot.
Right now my wife and I have regular "extended basic" cable and internet through US Cable and I think we pay right around $70 a month for the whole package. It's cheaper the closer to civilization you get around here (since we live out of town, we're impressed that we have ANY broadband options, so we can't complain about $70 a month for cable internet and TV).
Quote:

So, setting up broadband on Linux is pretty much plug-n-chug? I think Iíve got ethernet integrated into my motherboard. I just dropped a new motherboard into my box a few weeks back, so Iíll have to check on the particulars as to the type of connection. Is RJ-45 the oversized phone cord looking connector?
Yup... and if you're going with Comcast, I'm sure they use DHCP to assign IP addresses, so as long as you are DHCP capable in your Linux installation, you should be good to go.

I am not as familiar with Red Hat (7.2 was the last RH I used), but Slackware recognizes my normal network cards pretty much automatically in every machine on which I have it running. Way simpler than getting something like a Winmodem to work correctly. :eek:

And if you have problems with it, there are plenty of answers regarding DHCP and networking here on LQ if you search around a bit.

Trinity22 03-10-2004 04:28 PM

Broadband is simple with Ethernet. I've switched 5 distros and each time, no problem with internet access. I'm connected via Charter and a webstar modem.

Trinity

Hangdog42 03-10-2004 04:48 PM

I have Comcast and it works with linux without a problem. Well, as long as you don't call Comcast for support. Melkor is right in that Comcast help people get a bad case of the screaming heebie-jeebies when you mention the word "linux", but there is plenty of help here to get you up and running.

Quote:

There sure seems to be a lot of people using Linux here in the MN / WI area.
I put that down to a highly enlightened population ;) , including those of us who have been forced by circumstances to move away (I grew up in Roseville, just north of St. Paul).

gulo 03-11-2004 11:34 AM

Hangdog, youíre missing our wonderful spring weather! Tíwas down to 6 deg F when I got up this morning. At 11:00 AM its up to a balmy 9 deg F with a -11 windchill. Where are my shorts and sandals? ;) Iím about a mile from Roseville myself. Weíre you a fan of the conservatory when you were here? If so, theyíve just doubled it in size. The old park is looking good!

Have you ever seen those community creativity indexes? Iím guessing it all fits in somehow. The Twin Cities and Madison are considered to be pretty creative, dynamic places full of early adopters & such so I probably shouldnít be surprised that Linux is as popular is it seems to be in this area, at least among people with some science / engineering background.

Thanks all for the input on broadband for a Linux box. Iíll follow your advice and come here first for help setting it up. :) I still think itís funny that broadband is going to end up being < or = the cost of dial-up + a nearly useless land line.

Hangdog42 03-11-2004 01:00 PM

Quote:

Tíwas down to 6 deg F when I got up this morning. At 11:00 AM its up to a balmy 9 deg F with a -11 windchill.
OK, I guess there are a couple of things I don't miss so much.......

njbrain 03-11-2004 01:50 PM

My ISP claims (Frontiernet) claims that they don't support Linux. But, as you can see, I am using DSL with Linux.
Noah

dushkinup 03-11-2004 02:17 PM

Oh come on!
Don't be silly Zvulum Mooshashvili,

Installing a broadband is way easier than a modem connection in Linux. As long as your ISP supports PPPoE it's a piece of cake.

Melkor 03-11-2004 06:46 PM

US Cable also "doesn't support Linux".

And here I am, posting from home on my Slackware 9.1 machine. :cool:

gulo 03-12-2004 01:52 PM

What are you all paying for high speed internet in your area?

I did a little digging with local companies, and found some oddities...

For instance...
broadband in Minneapolis is < $30/mo thru Time Warner.
With no extra ISP charge and no phone line, this is cheaper than 56K.

broadband in St. Paul is a whopping $61/mo thru Comcast!!!!
Why is it double the price in St. Paul? I guess because they can.

DSL thru Qwest, IIRC, is ~$30/ mo + ISP charges + basic phone charges.

Directway Satellite high speed internet is ~ 60/mo + $400 in equipment (and have no idea if it will work with Linux)

vasudevadas 03-12-2004 01:54 PM

Ntlworld and Mandrake 9.1. I connected the cable modem to the ethernet port and it worked first time without any setup at all. Go for it!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:57 AM.