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Old 09-15-2006, 10:15 AM   #1
Greywolf_WI
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Domain Name Question


Hello.

I am a 'newbie' and know I've got a [I]lot[I]to learn. My question revolves around Domain names.

I have several registered domain names with a Web-hosting company with whom I only have the names registered with at the present time. If I set up a Web-server using my purchased and registered domain names, what happens? Do I 'owe' the web-hosting company I registered with anything?

Second. Is there a good source/site (book) where I could learn how to properly configure my (now two)servers?

As I said. I've got a lot to learn. And this is just plain embarrassing.

Thank you,

Greywolf
 
Old 09-15-2006, 11:01 AM   #2
Samoth
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The only bad question is the answer left unanswered. I recall O'reilly's DNS book, that taught me alot.
Cheers!

<<Samoth>>
 
Old 09-15-2006, 11:10 AM   #3
jlliagre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greywolf_WI
I have several registered domain names with a Web-hosting company with whom I only have the names registered with at the present time. If I set up a Web-server using my purchased and registered domain names, what happens?
Where do you want to install that web server ? with what IP address ?
 
Old 09-15-2006, 04:27 PM   #4
J.W.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greywolf_WI
I have several registered domain names with a Web-hosting company with whom I only have the names registered with at the present time. If I set up a Web-server using my purchased and registered domain names, what happens? Do I 'owe' the web-hosting company I registered with anything?
It depends on what you mean by "if I setup a web-server..." Are you talking about a co-located server, using a dedicated server, or using a managed server? Generally speaking, any outfit that lets you register a domain name will probably also offer one or more hosting plans. If you are already paying your current company for hosting services (but you are not currently using them) then I'd suggest just setting up your website with that company. OTOH, if you have simply registered the domains, but are interested in using someone else for the actual hosting, then what you'll need to do is transfer the domain over to the new hosting company. Most webhosts will have instructions on their website on how to do that transfer.

Regarding your "do I owe them anythimg" if you do transfer your domain, the answer is No. Although registering a domain and hosting a website are related, they are independent events. If you do decide to move your domain to a different company, you don't owe anything else to the original company
 
Old 09-15-2006, 07:42 PM   #5
Greywolf_WI
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To you all.

Thanks for responding.

I may be going waaaay over my head, but I would like to be free of a 'Hosting Site' and be 'independent'. I haven't the foggiest notion what that would entail, but that is my ultimate goal. From what I understand, I cannot really use a 'static' IP address. But then what IP address do I use? Is a differing one automatically assigned every time I access the internet? And if so, how could anyone access a 'moving target'?

I realize these are questions that are far to complicated to address here. And I have purchased a number of quality reference books (The Craig Hunt/Sybex series and an O' Reilley book on DNS and BIND which I am awaiting) but would like a brief reply as to what would happen if I set up a website home page on a server using SLES 10 using paid-for domain names that are registered with a Web-Hosting company? Is this too much of an endeavor to tackle?

One last question: Is there an IP address I can experiment and 'practice' with without fouling things up with my ISP? (Like I've indicated, I am lost at sea here and just need to see in what direction I need to go.)

Thanks for the help I am getting.
 
Old 09-15-2006, 08:33 PM   #6
J.W.
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Greywolf_WI, feel free to ask as many questions as you want. The LQ community is here to help.

I'll try to answer your questions as best as I can. As you may know, there are three basic hosting plans available:

1. Virtual server - this is by far the most common, and will be the least expensive. Basically you'd register your domain (or transfer an existing domain) to the hosting company, and they would host your website on one of their servers. Most webhosts also offer website-building tools to help people create their site. Note that since most websites are relatively small, your website would be on a server that is also hosting many others. The specific IP address would be assigned by the hosting company, and would be permanent for as long as you hosted your site with them. You would manage the actual content of your site, but the hardware and server software would be managed by the hosting company. The hosting company should offer technical support, and would be available to assist you with getting your site up and running (as well as responding to any connectivity or availability issues) That doesn't necessarily mean that they will help debug your HTML code, but if you have questions about, say, how to set up a configuration file to work with Apache v2.0 rather than v1.3 they should be able to assist.

2. Dedicated server - in terms of control, dedicated servers are one step up from virtual servers. You essentially would be renting a specific machine from the hosting company; the only thing running on that machine would be your website. Obviously this will be more expensive than a virtual server. From a technical perspective, the hosting company would be responsible for the hardware, but you would be responsible for all the software. To illustrate, suppose that under the virtual hosting plan the hosting company only permitted you to have a single PHP database but you wanted to set up multiple databases - under a dedicated server, you could do so. To a certain extent, it's 'your' server, and you can install whatever you want on it, possibly including which distro and version of Apache, MySQL, PHP, etc, are installed, depending on what the hosting company offers (and all within the TOS of course, you would not be allowed to set up anything malicious) The IP address would be assigned by the host, and would be permanent for as long as you hosted your site with them. If there was a hardware failure (eg, hard drive crash) the company would be responsible for fixing it, but if you installed a new version of some package and it broke your functionality, you're on your own.

3. Colocation - practically speaking this is maximum level of control you can get. Basically you would build your own machine, install whatever software you wanted, and then physically bring it to the hosting company. To a certain extent you are more or less renting floor space from them, and you are 100% on your own. If there are any sorts of hardware or software issues, they will not be able to help you (because it's truly your machine and they will have no idea what's on it. This will probably be the most expensive option but gives you the greatest degree of control. The IP address will be assigned by the host and will be permanent for as long as you host your site with them. Realistically, if you are looking at colocation, you need to be geographically close to the hosting company,

To summarize:

Virtual -- hardware is managed by the webhost, software is managed by the webhost, website content is managed by you
Dedicated -- hardware is managed by the webhost, software is managed by you, website content is managed by you
Colocation -- hardware is managed by you, software is managed by you, website content is managed by you

Obviously, the specific options available will depend on the hostimg company. (Definitely shop around before signing up, as there are all kinds of options out there.) Unfortunately it would be difficult to completely remove a hosting company from the equation, because you will need Internet connectivity. Lastly, No, there is no "practice" IP address that you could use for testing purposes.

Omnis is an LQ advertiser, and they have some good information on their website. Good luck with it

Last edited by J.W.; 09-16-2006 at 10:08 AM.
 
Old 09-15-2006, 10:37 PM   #7
jlliagre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greywolf_WI
I may be going waaaay over my head, but I would like to be free of a 'Hosting Site' and be 'independent'.
This may be doable but you would need :
- your ISP to give you a fixed IP address, and this may or may not be an option with it.
- a reliable Internet connection and sufficient upward bandwidth
- running a couple of DNS servers hosted somewhere, which means you are still not independent ...
Quote:
I haven't the foggiest notion what that would entail, but that is my ultimate goal. From what I understand, I cannot really use a 'static' IP address. But then what IP address do I use? Is a differing one automatically assigned every time I access the internet?
That's usually the case.
Quote:
And if so, how could anyone access a 'moving target'?
Dyndns is one of the services allowing frequent and automatized IP update.
http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/
You can't use the name you have yet registered with this service though, you have to choose one under one of the dyndns available domain names.
 
Old 09-16-2006, 10:08 AM   #8
Greywolf_WI
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Wow.

I am so appreciative of the information I received here. I'm still 'at sea', but not 'lost' now.

I am going to start going the various books I now have regarding DNS, SLES 10, BIND and Apache Web serving administration. (I should be finished sometime early in the next century.)

A heartfelt thanks to all that responded. I now have my 'bearings'. I now just have to read, read, read, and read some more.

The entire Linux 'experience' has been absolutely exhilarating for me thus far.

Bye.
 
  


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