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Old 02-18-2002, 02:51 AM   #1
gui10
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did u ever notice...


that the guys who make the money are those with the ideas...
the tech guys only slog it out to make the magic work...

in a world fast becoming a network of sub-contracting, techies are just like machines... and the businessmen remain businessmen...

just a thought... hope i'm not being too vague...
 
Old 02-18-2002, 03:52 AM   #2
Bert
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That's very unfair.

Only failed tecchies become businessmen.

Bert
 
Old 02-18-2002, 04:52 AM   #3
gui10
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ah... i got the feeling i wasn't being clear... my apologies

what i meant to say was... after all the hype, tech is only a tool...
i mean, i'm a techie worker too (albeit a very new one) and i work for a tech team.
the company that sub-contracts us to do the tech part of their ideas... they come in and demand for stuff. they take the fat money from the client. we get paid a small part of it.

yep probably the failed or tired techies become the businessmen . i feel and think now that business is much much more than mere technology (pardon me,it's something i didnt' see before. i thought the skills and good product and advertising would do it). one of my bosses (and part owner of the company) is an expert techie in his field... but he's so caught up with it that it's hard for him to do business...

just a realization... sorry for the misunderstanding...

Last edited by gui10; 02-18-2002 at 04:54 AM.
 
Old 02-18-2002, 09:13 AM   #4
Bert
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Technical knowledge ages quickly - it's like running up a skateboard ramp!

Being a manager doesn't go out of fashion like swimwear and in the end the people who are mediocre at programming etc. become managers.
What's interesting for me is that managers necessarily have to hire people smarter than them (there would be problems if they didn't!) and if that's the case then there's a flawed assumption for the interviewing process (that the interviewer is necessarily smarter than the interviewee).
Managing people is more fraught than dealing with computers but if you want to become a corporate value-adder you have to do both, first mess around with machines then with people, in that order.
 
Old 02-18-2002, 09:19 AM   #5
LinuzRulz
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Unhappy

In business school they get credit for learning how to use a calculator, a piece of software, a computer, etc. The techies gotta make it all click so the p.o.s. bidnessmen can downsize and kick the technical brains to the curb because of some dumbass decision THEY made caused sales to plummet. Go figger!!
 
Old 02-18-2002, 12:02 PM   #6
taz.devil
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The analogy of a technical worker always running up the ramp of technology was good...I'm a 'retired' if you will, technician (at 27 years of age LOL) and technology has severely passed me by as i've slid towards the bottom. I'm the guy hanging on to the side of the ramp just to keep pace for home use now. When I worked, I couldn't stand the fact that all my clients demanded upon demand for one thing or the other, and then pretend that they had the smarts, if not to fix it, but to hire my company, therefore deminishing my role to nothing more than 'the guy that was in to fix something the other day'. Buisness is sickening, but unfortunately you have to have it to survive. Oh well, i'm now content twiddling with my OWN equipment.
 
Old 02-18-2002, 12:35 PM   #7
finegan
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Quote:
Originally posted by Bert
Technical knowledge ages quickly - it's like running up a skateboard ramp!
Yeah, this is easy to agree to... but you have to remember that the more that you learn, the easier it is to make those intuitive leaps. For instance, I got this fun gig over the weekend setting up the office of this interior design firm. 2 machines, 3 printers, fax machine, scanner, plotter, DSL, baby Router (Thank you Linksys!). The machines ran XP and 2k. I've never dealt with either, but how to set up all of the office's dozens of quirks was a matter of basically... well-educated guessing. It took about 6 hours including staple-gunning cat-5 and re-installing Win2k once.

Take that over to Linux. I've never dealt with HP-UX, but I'm pretty sure I could get networking running, get things to compile on it, etc. The downshot I guess to fiddling with computers is that you spend 4 years catching up to the bleeding edge, and then the rest of your time split between using the knowledge and continuing to learn more so you can stay on the bleeding edge.

What was I on about?

Cheers,

Finegan
 
Old 02-18-2002, 02:04 PM   #8
Bert
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.
Quote:
Yeah, this is easy to agree to... but you have to remember that the more that you learn, the easier it is to make those intuitive leaps.
That depends on whether you happened to be a technician when new 'paradigms' come along, as they have a habit of doing.

In 1990 there were over 120 procedural non-procedural programming languages in 'common' use in the industry. Today, less than 10 of them are still around (one of them is SQL!).

If you have a crystal ball, it's easy.

These days, if you can program in java, your boss (or a potential bosss) will ask 'Yeah, err, what can you program in java?' which is a reasonable question as it takes 10 years to master a 4th gen language.

Unless of course you learnt smalltalk or one of the many other OO languages which the java 'paradigm' effectively "replaced".
 
Old 02-18-2002, 02:33 PM   #9
finegan
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Yeah, no kidding. I keep forgetting that prior to 1990 the sheer diversity of the computing world made it impossible to carry useful knowledge from one platform to the next. Also, before the web was that useful a place, pre-1995-ish, it must have been even harder to keep up that violent learning curve.

I'm glad I came out of my luddite cave as late as I did.

Cheers,

Finegan
 
  


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