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Old 02-04-2005, 07:57 PM   #1
speel
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computer science college question


well im 16 and next year is college application time and im intrested in computer science but i do not know alot about it and what i wanna know is what is involved in computer science and if that is a good career path and such


thanks!
 
Old 02-04-2005, 08:09 PM   #2
rksprst
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computer science is VERY interesting...but id have to say that it usually does not pay well. also, there are not that many jobs + too many people looking for jobs

first, what you need to do is learn some programming language, although realize that programming is somewhat different then computer science, if you can take a computer science class. you really shouldnt think of it as a career path if you don't know much about it. first learn about it, and you will know if you like it and want to do that for a career. and besides teaching computer science there is really no career path that deals with it. now there is programming, but that is somewhat different. for true computer science, you really don't need a programming language

dont know if this is what you wanted to know or not...
 
Old 02-04-2005, 08:21 PM   #3
speel
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lol no not really l , ive been learning C slowly and its fun and all but i cant see my self as a programer .. like it does not intrest me enough to make a career out of it .. hmm any one else with opinions?
 
Old 02-05-2005, 01:56 AM   #4
floppywhopper
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here in australia at least
there is a real demand for red hat technicians and engineers
and i suppose novell / suse techs and engineers

yeah yeah i know a certificate doesnt stack up to real experience
but if you can get both experience and a ticket
you're laughing

floppy
 
Old 02-05-2005, 09:50 AM   #5
stabile007
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Quote:
Originally posted by rksprst
computer science is VERY interesting...but id have to say that it usually does not pay well. also, there are not that many jobs + too many people looking for jobs

first, what you need to do is learn some programming language, although realize that programming is somewhat different then computer science, if you can take a computer science class. you really shouldnt think of it as a career path if you don't know much about it. first learn about it, and you will know if you like it and want to do that for a career. and besides teaching computer science there is really no career path that deals with it. now there is programming, but that is somewhat different. for true computer science, you really don't need a programming language

dont know if this is what you wanted to know or not...
I have no idea where you got this from but I find it to be completely off base.

Right now I am finishing up 4th year of college for my CS degree. CS majors are programmers. That is what you do. And there sure is a lot of oppurtunity for a programmer if you know where to look. Also it can be a career. I know quite a few people actually who are CS majors and are really well off. What do you think CS is? It is certainly not the study of computers. At least here in the states the general premise is like this:

IS Majors are - network admins and tech support type people
CS Majors- are programmers
CE Majors - are those people who design microprocessors and circuits for computers
SE majors - I forget

If you don't want to program don't go into CS go into IST......
 
Old 02-05-2005, 10:01 AM   #6
speel
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thanks
 
Old 02-05-2005, 10:22 AM   #7
jailbait
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"well im 16 and next year is college application time and im intrested in computer science but i do not know alot about it and what i wanna know is what is involved in computer science and if that is a good career path and such"

Another possibility that you could consider is Electrical Engineering. The hardware side of computing is just as interesting and pays just as well as the software side.

-----------------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 02-05-2005, 11:09 AM   #8
harken
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I must say that I agree with most of what stabile007 said. Programming is the "heart" of CS. If you don't know programming you probably will never understand how exactly does a program work. You'll only know that pressing a button of the mouse or a key on the keyboard will determine a program to do a certain thing but you won't know HOW it does it.
And that will make you just a regular end-user with more or less knowledge about computers compared to other end-users, depending on how much you've learnt.

Yet, I've seen network admins that knew nothing about programming and had quite nice financial earnings.

Anyway, if you want to know more about computers I'd suggest learning at least one programming language, not at the highest level, but at least to be able to write a...tictactoe game let's say.

It's also fun, you know, once you get the taste of it.

Good luck!
 
Old 02-05-2005, 11:33 AM   #9
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SE seems like a very interesting field. It's kind of a combination of software and hardware. Form what I've read, it's mostly the integration of software and hardware, so you'll get to work in both fields. That's what I'm hoping to do next year as I have a pretty good amount of hardware knowledge already and am starting into the software side of computing.
 
Old 02-05-2005, 12:13 PM   #10
sick-o-windoze
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Quote:
Originally posted by jailbait

Another possibility that you could consider is Electrical Engineering. The hardware side of computing is just as interesting and pays just as well as the software side.

[/B]
Is that for sure? I know two EE engineers and they are programmers and admins because they're was nothing for them to do in their chosen field.

A lot has to do with the college and the internship programs that get people launched. If you go to college just for a degree, I think it's kind of missing the point. That's like going to a club assuming you're going to just going to leave with someone and "get lucky."

You need to have a plan of action. You need to get specific about what you want. It's OK if you don't know right now. But as in going out, groom well, be nice and don't say anything stupid. It's all about networking and contacts. Jobs are like women this way. Someone girl you meet will like you and set you up with their friend. Maybe you like her and maybe you don't. That's how you'll know what job you don't want too.

The technology changes faster than they can come up with college courses by about 5 years anyway. I learned Fortran on punch cards, later I had VAX BASIC and CPM. How useful was that?

Make lots of friends and contacts all over the place. Be a good guy. Business is about relationships. To do well in business you have to do well with people. To do well in tech business, you have to be smart with people and VERY smart with technology. Which is more enjoyable or easier? That's something each of us can decide only for ourselves.

Sincerely, best of luck on your quest.
 
Old 02-05-2005, 12:52 PM   #11
Brain Drop
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I am currently a junior majoring in computer science. This will be my fourth career. I have had decent paying jobs where I was unhappy, and low paying jobs where I was happy. The point is, you have to do some deep soul searching and decide what you really like to do. Consider, there are no loops in the program of your life: You only get to do this once, so make sure your code is harmonious with your needs. Do you really want to devote the majority of your waking life to a job that is not what you truly want?

As for what computer science is like, for me it is like a whole bunch of wonderful little puzzles to solve.
 
Old 02-05-2005, 11:06 PM   #12
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Network admins tend to be drawn from the IST majors. THey don't do much programming if any. They typically do not come from the CS pool.
 
Old 02-05-2005, 11:11 PM   #13
stabile007
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Quote:
Originally posted by jailbait
"well im 16 and next year is college application time and im intrested in computer science but i do not know alot about it and what i wanna know is what is involved in computer science and if that is a good career path and such"

Another possibility that you could consider is Electrical Engineering. The hardware side of computing is just as interesting and pays just as well as the software side.

-----------------------------
Steve Stites
Or Computer Engineering may be more like what you are suggesting. But be warned CE/EE is not a major where you throw PC parts together into a case. We are talking hardcore circuit traces, and layouts. I was a CE major for a year and didn't like it so now I am CS.
 
Old 02-06-2005, 06:44 PM   #14
ezra143
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I would reccomend both Education and Certifications. If you want career advancement both the technical know-how and a good business sense is essential. Personally, I would reccomend a BS in Business and a few certifications. Now, thats marketable. Especially with some experience under your belt.
 
  


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