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Old 08-02-2013, 10:20 AM   #31
911InsideJob
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Corporate fascism is taking over. If the World Bank has its way all countries will be subsidiaries of Earth Inc. Don't blame Hitler though, it was actually Mussolini (see "The Doctrine of Fascism") and his friends like Franco and Pinochet. I won't name his American friends because mods here can't handle the truth. All out states and most of our cities are now corporations though, like the Federal Corporation.

Anywho, first cypher I cracked was on the cover of JRR Tolkien's "The Hobbit". Think I was 13 at the time. You'll need to find the green hardcover with pictures but those Elvish or Dwarvish (I forget which, oops) ruins are substitutions for English letters. Have fun!
 
Old 08-02-2013, 02:26 PM   #32
frieza
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
Actually, a one-time pad, implemented and used correctly with true random data in uncrackable.

However, it can only be implemented correctly outside of a computer, i.e. a sketch pad with metal back plate and some dice. The cypher text can then be sent using any means at your disposal, including internet. The only problems left are keeping the pad secret and safe, and transmitting the data without arousing suspicion. Both can be solved with some cleverness.
when it comes to agencies like the CIA/NSA the real question isn't the 'crackibility' of the encryption, but rather whether or not the algorithm has a 'backdoor' built into it that allows the encryption to be bypassed and decrypted without the key or with a secret squirrel 'master' key.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 911InsideJob View Post
Corporate fascism is taking over. If the World Bank has its way all countries will be subsidiaries of Earth Inc. Don't blame Hitler though, it was actually Mussolini (see "The Doctrine of Fascism") and his friends like Franco and Pinochet. I won't name his American friends because mods here can't handle the truth. All out states and most of our cities are now corporations though, like the Federal Corporation.

Anywho, first cypher I cracked was on the cover of JRR Tolkien's "The Hobbit". Think I was 13 at the time. You'll need to find the green hardcover with pictures but those Elvish or Dwarvish (I forget which, oops) ruins are substitutions for English letters. Have fun!
hee hee, it's all about the money, money=power unfortunately.
p.s. they elvish characters are called runes, not ruins :P
 
Old 08-02-2013, 08:13 PM   #33
jefro
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They may not be as good as China but they can do it. What do you think they buy supercomputers for?

Last edited by jefro; 08-14-2013 at 08:47 PM.
 
Old 08-02-2013, 09:35 PM   #34
ntubski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frieza View Post
when it comes to agencies like the CIA/NSA the real question isn't the 'crackibility' of the encryption, but rather whether or not the algorithm has a 'backdoor' built into it that allows the encryption to be bypassed and decrypted without the key or with a secret squirrel 'master' key.
Uncrackable implies no 'backdoor'.
 
Old 08-03-2013, 10:34 AM   #35
sundialsvcs
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Given the #CLASSIFIED# of our dollars that this agency consumes every #CLASSIFIED#, I would expect that #REDACTED# be able to successfully read #REDACTED# any time they #REDACTED# #REDACTED#.

But, that doesn't mean that important communications should not be encrypted: they should. For the same reason that you should lock your car in the parking lot even though the car has glass windows that are no match for a sledgehammer. If it's important and confidential, it should not be "trivially easy" to read it, as is the case of open e-mail. But if you're committing a crime, you shouldn't rely on bit-twiddling to protect you.
 
Old 08-14-2013, 02:42 PM   #36
ponce
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Your encrypted files are 'exponentially easier' to crack, warn MIT boffins
 
Old 08-14-2013, 06:36 PM   #37
Habitual
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"Locks" of any kind are for honest people.
 
Old 09-18-2013, 07:41 AM   #38
Arcane
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Related news. FBI cracked Tor server network.
http://www.cnews.ru/top/2013/09/16/f...tyu_tor_543194
 
Old 09-18-2013, 07:49 AM   #39
H_TeXMeX_H
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Yeah, I haven't used Tor in quite a while and will not be using it again.
 
Old 09-19-2013, 10:27 AM   #40
911InsideJob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
But if you're committing a crime, you shouldn't rely on bit-twiddling to protect you.
Tor was a honeypot and personal encryption keys are for identity non-repudiation in a court of law. This isn't a free market or a free country. Tor wouldn't have been allowed to succeed if they hadn't agreed to conspire. If you're planning on committing a crime all you really need is the authority to get away with it. That's why military militants can target individual for electronic harasment then call the victim a "mass murderer" and their military casualties "victims".

The corporate fascists running the District of Criminals/Columbia (aka "the government") have nobody to blame but themsleves.
 
Old 09-20-2013, 02:21 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
"Locks" of any kind are for honest people.
"Who speaks of liberty while the human mind is in chains?" Francis Wright
 
Old 09-21-2013, 02:58 PM   #42
ChrisAbela
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Tor was a honeypot and personal encryption keys are for identity non-repudiation in a court of law.
The FBI simply exploited a Java vulnerability on older versions of the TOR browser to uncover the identity of users of hidden pedophile sites. I can only compliment the FBI for this operation.
 
  


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