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Old 04-23-2014, 09:53 AM   #16
YankeePride13
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You could always write code that fits into short functions that won't require massive amounts of scrolling.

*EDIT*

I personally prefer wider screens when coding because I am often looking at other things on seperate windows at the same time. Whether it be API reference, a language manual, or just basic troubleshooting on Google I find it to be advantageous to have extra screen real estate to the side.

Granted, a second monitor does the same job.

Last edited by YankeePride13; 04-23-2014 at 09:55 AM.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 09:56 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
You can prop a Surface 2 Pro (or another tablet PC) up vertically and still use an external keyboard, can't you?

Honestly, though, there's really no good solution to this. The reality is that the standard way to solve it is to buy an external monitor and use it where you can.
Ha! Plug in a keyboard and a monitor to it. May as well use a stationary computer then.

OP: Functions should generally not exceed 24 lines. How many lines do you have? Maybe your functions are just too long. 50+ lines is a sign of code smell:

Quote:
  • Long method: a method, function, or procedure that has grown too large.
  • Large class: a class that has grown too large. See God object.
Try viewing the code in the console with less. Is it readable?
 
Old 04-23-2014, 10:00 AM   #18
YankeePride13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soderlund View Post
Ha! Plug in a keyboard and a monitor to it. May as well use a stationary computer then.

OP: Functions should generally not exceed 24 lines.
I agree that functions should be short, but 24 lines is a bit much depending on the job.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 11:35 AM   #19
enine
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While its nice to be portable, coding and gaming are a couple of the areas that don't fit laptops/portables well as you want the bigger faster systems. Even if I compile a package I'll download it to my server and do it there rather than on my portable.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 11:38 AM   #20
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
And when questions are fairly pointless, it's best not to ask them.
It is said that "the only stupid question is the one left unasked".
This question and the thread is useful and important to me. And since
this thread seems pointless to you and since you already know that
"there is no real problem to solve here" then you may consider spending
your precious time elsewhere and leave this thread alone.

I am done with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by YankeePride13 View Post
You could always write code that fits into short functions that won't require massive amounts of scrolling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soderlund View Post
OP: Functions should generally not exceed 24 lines. How many lines do you have? Maybe your functions are just too long. 50+ lines is a sign of code smell:
I understand that but when you are working with a company then you have
you work with the massive amount of spaghetti code the previous developer
has written.

Secondly, the code of QML files is really messy since there aren't any
classes and functions. Yes, we can separate out components in different
QML files but then for giant GUI buildings the code does get messy. Well,
I am new w.r.t QML and haven't yet mastered writing non-messy QML code. :-(
 
Old 04-23-2014, 01:04 PM   #21
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheIndependentAquarius View Post
It is said that "the only stupid question is the one left unasked".
That is obviously not true.
Quote:
This question and the thread is useful and important to me. And since this thread seems pointless to you and since you already know that "there is no real problem to solve here" then you may consider spending your precious time elsewhere and leave this thread alone. I am done with you.
Excellent news, and glad that you realized that there is no problem to solve. Again, you've been given advice...whether you take it or not is nothing anyone here can help with. If you're after a laptop with a huge amount of vertical resolution, then buy one. The issue of width (as you mention in your first post) has nothing to do with it...horizontal resolution may have increased, but so has vertical.
Quote:
I understand that but when you are working with a company then you have you work with the massive amount of spaghetti code the previous developer
has written.

Secondly, the code of QML files is really messy since there aren't any classes and functions. Yes, we can separate out components in different QML files but then for giant GUI buildings the code does get messy. Well, I am new w.r.t QML and haven't yet mastered writing non-messy QML code. :-(
If this is for a company, then get them to buy whatever you're comfortable with. Tell them what you need.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 01:18 PM   #22
273
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TB0ne, have you really not noticed that the standard resolution for laptops has gone from 1280*1024 (or thereabouts) to 1280*720? Did you also not hear anything about "widescreen" at the time?
I can't work out if you're being deliberately awkward or you're just too wealthy to know that the price of horizontal pixels has gone up.
There is also the issue that was mentioned in a reply to one of my earlier posts that just cramming in more pixels to a screen that's smaller horizontally is not the answer. Again, are you being deliberately awkward or has your eagle-like eyesight not found you squinting at smaller text in order to get in the usual number of lines?
Apologies for being a little argumentative but I really don't understand your apparent need to belittle what seems to be to be a perfectly valid question about whether there are any laptops which help with the loss of horizontal lines caused by the industry changing to "widescreen" displays.
Before you reply that you made suggestions I did see that but I also see that most of your comments are along the lines of "there is no problem, just buy a $1000 monitor, silly".
 
Old 04-23-2014, 01:21 PM   #23
dugan
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A current 15-inch Mac laptop has a 2880x1800 screen.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 02:04 PM   #24
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 273 View Post
TB0ne, have you really not noticed that the standard resolution for laptops has gone from 1280*1024 (or thereabouts) to 1280*720? Did you also not hear anything about "widescreen" at the time?
Yes, sure did. Also heard about picture quality improving, too.
Quote:
I can't work out if you're being deliberately awkward or you're just too wealthy to know that the price of horizontal pixels has gone up.
There is also the issue that was mentioned in a reply to one of my earlier posts that just cramming in more pixels to a screen that's smaller horizontally is not the answer. Again, are you being deliberately awkward or has your eagle-like eyesight not found you squinting at smaller text in order to get in the usual number of lines?
No, because I don't have ANY issues with increasing the font size when I need it, nor do I have problems scrolling when I need to. I can also use bookmarking capabilities in my editor to let me flip back and forth easily. And that's just with ONE monitor. When you get two, the problems vanish, and can vanish for as little as $99, which even 'non wealthy' folks can afford (myself included). The OP asked about resolution...yes, the 4:3 ratio was fine...but having the ability to have two good-sized windows up at the same time on a 16:9 ALSO lets me display things side-by-side...essentially letting me view MUCH more than even a huge screen can.
Quote:
Apologies for being a little argumentative but I really don't understand your apparent need to belittle what seems to be to be a perfectly valid question about whether there are any laptops which help with the loss of horizontal lines caused by the industry changing to "widescreen" displays.
Before you reply that you made suggestions I did see that but I also see that most of your comments are along the lines of "there is no problem, just buy a $1000 monitor, silly".
I never said to purchase a $1000 monitor. I *DID* say there are laptops with VERY high resolution, and mentioned only one, the other being a Surface tablet which had what the OP asked for: a detachable keyboard, and the ability to flip it to portrait mode. I drew a comparison between the vertical resolution on one, and the horizontal on the other..since 'flipping' it made the comparison 1920 (flipped, Surface Pro 2), to 1800 (Dell laptop, landscape). And yes, my monitor did cost a good bit...but it's less than $700 now. And since I use it to make my living, it's not only a business expense, but the gain in productivity I have has more than paid for it.

And I'm not belittling anything, but stating a fact. There are NO portrait laptops that I'm aware of; if you know of any, please let us know. And if you want more screen real-estate, you buy a machine with a bigger screen, period. No way around it, at all, and there never was. So the choices go back to very common sense ones:
  • Buy a laptop that has specs that you want
  • Buy a laptop that has specs CLOSE to that of what you want (and can afford)
  • Buy a desktop workstation w/as many monitors as you'd like
This is much like the "What's the best Linux?" questions that always get posted. There IS no 'best'...everything is subjective. The OP asked "I find it difficult and most irritating to scroll big codes on wide screen laptops. Are there some laptops/notebooks which can be helpful for programming considering the problem described above?" How can anyone else say what's helpful for someone else? The OP never said what resolution they were using, what they wanted to be using; just that widescreens weren't enough. Very subjective.

My $600 Vaio has 1920x1080, and is all I need for programming on a laptop. Desktop has two large monitors. That's what is 'helpful' for me. I'm sure that others would hate my setup. I've NEVER seen two programmers EVER have the same setups for things, have you?

Last edited by TB0ne; 04-23-2014 at 02:07 PM.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 02:25 PM   #25
273
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Thanks for the polite response, TB0ne. I am glad you do see that there is a problem for some people.
There are people for whom, for whatever reason, the loss of screen height causes issues (I am one but due to rubbish old software and hellish equipment request procedures I don't have any options). I think that sadly the only answers are compromises and the 4:3 is dead but I also think that's a shame.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 03:39 PM   #26
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 273 View Post
Thanks for the polite response, TB0ne. I am glad you do see that there is a problem for some people.
There are people for whom, for whatever reason, the loss of screen height causes issues (I am one but due to rubbish old software and hellish equipment request procedures I don't have any options). I think that sadly the only answers are compromises and the 4:3 is dead but I also think that's a shame.
Absolutely, there is a problem for some people, but there's no good way to address it. You've got to buy what you want/can afford, if you think you need it. I had to prioritize things to get my desktop setup the way I wanted it, and shelling out $$$ for the video cards/monitors I have wasn't pleasant, but the result sure was. Thankfully, I can hang on to those items for numerous years.

To me, the 16:9 is better, since I tend to want side-by-side; the OP wants more lines DOWN, so it's either making peace with what's currently affordable, or plunking down the $$$ for a high-end unit with monster graphics capabilities. There isn't a 'best' laptop for programming, or even one that's better than another.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 07:08 PM   #27
AnanthaP
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To be honest, when I first saw the title of the thread, I was intrigued. Maybe the laptop would:
  • Know the resources available to me - maybe the laptop will a built-in "programming" option that would list all available tools.
  • Plan my program - the laptop has a tool that transforms thought to pseudo code.
  • Built in lint.
  • Make portable code
  • Something useful ..
  • More science fiction ??

OK
 
Old 04-25-2014, 04:14 AM   #28
Germany_chris
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@OP 16:9 on a computer sucks and is solely a cost saving measure. I've been going through this for months I cannot find a PC laptop at 16:10 or 4:3 so my next portable will again be a Mac because they are the only folks who put 16:10 screens in their computers. I also won't buy 16:9 external displays those 180 pixels are pricey 1920x1200 and 2560x1600 displays are generally better build.
 
  


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