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Old 01-22-2013, 03:25 PM   #16
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Tell me about it! I still struggle with Debian and only perform the minamal needed.
Build DEB packages: http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/ma.../index.en.html
Build RPM packages: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_t...an_RPM_package

Quote:
Reducing the 600 to 2 was just a theoretically speaking; 'what if' they were the last distro's on the planet-
If I only could stick to RPM distros (which hopefully will never be the case) I would look for a way to replace RPM with Slackware's packages, but I think it would be easier to just start a LFS run with Slackware's package management.

Quote:
You can build a pkg from source in 5 seconds!
No, I can build a package from a compiled source in 5 seconds. Software that compiles in 5 seconds is hard to find.

@future_computer: Please post the contents of the .zip-file you downloaded.
 
Old 01-23-2013, 12:48 PM   #17
Ztcoracat
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Thanks for the New Debian Maintainers Guide and the How To create a RPM pkg.!


Quote:
I would look for a way to replace RPM with Slackware's packages
I would have to use Slackware for a few days to understand specifically how one could replace RPM with Slackware's pkg's. And to further understand why (reasons to support) you say what you do-

We all have our preferences.As an example; I use Debian and Fedora but my roomate uses Windows 7-

From what I'm comprehending from what your telling me; Slackware sounds very stable and superior in functionality and performance in regard to it's own management tools.
 
Old 01-23-2013, 02:20 PM   #18
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Slackware sounds very stable
It is indeed. When one of my Slackware systems has a crash I can be sure that the problem was my previous action, not the OS itself.

Quote:
and superior in functionality and performance in regard to it's own management tools.
I think this is a matter of taste. For me the lack of dependency resolution is an advantage, some used to Fedora or Debian may have problems to grasp why, you have to actually try it (from my experience as former Debian user, I tried Slackware just because the huge number of Slackers at LQ made me curious about Slackware, I was a happy user of Debian and not searching for a distro to replace it).
For other people having to resolve dependencies manually is a no-go and outweighs by far the advantages of the simple and straightforward package management. The same is true for the actual configuration of the distro, someone used to (and wanting to) configure the system using GUI dialogs may possibly not want to use plain textfiles for configuration.
For me Slackware is the best distribution out there, it fits my style of working with the system perfectly, so for me it is superior. If it is superior for you can only you decide, so trying it is the best option you have and you have nothing to loose if you do so (but maybe you win a new favorite distro and the Slackware community a new member).
 
Old 01-24-2013, 07:35 PM   #19
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Quote:
For other people having to resolve dependencies manually
With Slackware is that "resolving dependencies" one less thing I would have to comply to?

I'm currently running Fedora 17 but will soon have to do a fresh install of Fedora 18. At that time
I may not even install it and consider Slackware instead.
Agreed; I have nothing to loose by trying it-

But first I must learn more about Slackware(read the documentation) to feel at home with it's fresh install and read the all of the release notes and anything else I can get my hands on. I'm a strong beliver in preparation before the actually performance.

I re-searched Fedora for 4 weeks before I installed it and I'm glad I did-

Wonder what that zip file of future_computer's consist of?
He would use yum to unzip that file right? Like:
Code:
unzip file.zip
Or beesu yum unzip (name of file)
 
Old 01-24-2013, 08:15 PM   #20
TobiSGD
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Yum is a package manager, it is not used for anything that is not a package.

Quote:
With Slackware is that "resolving dependencies" one less thing I would have to comply to?
With Slackware you have to resolve dependencies manually, in opposite to package managers like yum or apt-get, that pull in dependencies automatically.
 
Old 01-24-2013, 08:40 PM   #21
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
With Slackware you have to resolve dependencies manually
Ah, the truth; I like it but this will be a challenge for me as I am spoiled with
Debian and Fedora pulling in the dependencies for me.

Now I understand why Slackware is a good teacher! ! (not yelling just happy; what your teaching me)

I appreciate you filling in the blanks for me.

Thanks TobiSGD!
 
Old 01-25-2013, 10:50 PM   #22
future_computer
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the driver was installed but printer no response to print job.
 
Old 01-26-2013, 12:00 AM   #23
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
the driver was installed but printer no response to print job.
Sorry to hear that.

Looking for a cups driver and doing some reading to help you.

http://www.fuduntu.org/wiki/index.php/Tutorials

Here's the forum for your disto. I'll look in there and see what is posted.
http://www.fuduntu.org/forum/
 
Old 01-26-2013, 12:54 AM   #24
Ztcoracat
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Look in Applications Menu> Administration> Printing and go through the Printing Wizard, set up your printer and see if that helps.

Look in your /usr/lib/cups and see if you have 'gutenprint'
Gutenprint is a very high quality package of printer drivers for Ghostscript and CUPS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutenprint

To print a page try running:
Quote:
lp (name of file)
I'm reading through this to help-
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Printing-Usage-HOWTO-2.html

Last edited by Ztcoracat; 01-26-2013 at 01:06 AM.
 
Old 03-25-2013, 08:09 PM   #25
Lilgamesh
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As of now only the 2/3 distributions ran on my computers for months and Fuduntu is one of them.

Simplicity of Gnome2 with rolling releases (lastest software) and snappier performance, I am impressed.
 
Old 10-03-2013, 06:47 PM   #26
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I am using Zorin now, I installed it on a USB3.0 external drive, it runs very fast.
 
Old 10-03-2013, 10:07 PM   #27
Ztcoracat
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Yes, Zorin is nice. I downloaded it and tried a Live CD a few months ago-
Enjoy your new Zorin future_computer-
 
  


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