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-   -   i386??? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/fedora-35/i386-113433/)

opafire 11-07-2003 10:43 AM

i386???
 
why is fedora and RedHat still stuck at i386. pretty much all other distros have advanced. mandrake is at i586 and others like arch are up to i 686.
Anybody have any clue??

evil_Tak 11-07-2003 10:45 AM

So that you can still run those binaries on a 486 or 386. Lots of old gateways, web servers, mail servers, and that kind of thing still run on 486s.

FXRS 11-07-2003 11:14 AM

I've got kind of a old lap top. P3 700 with only 128 meg of ram. Min requirements from what I read are 192 and 256 suggested. Fedora runs like a champ on my laptop. :D

FX

opafire 11-07-2003 11:20 AM

yeah I see what you're saying, it just seems like they would have went up to i586 by now though.

wapcaplet 11-07-2003 12:17 PM

You can always compile your own, optimized for your CPU, if you're really interested :)

My suspicion is that they keep it that way so you don't have to buy a whole new computer every time you get a new OS. Unlike some other OS vendors we could name...

cropcircle 11-07-2003 01:17 PM

A quote from the Fedora Core 1 Release Notes :

"Fedora Core 1 is optimized for Pentium PRO (and later) CPUs, but also supports Pentium-class CPUs. This approach has been taken because Pentium-class optimizations actually result in reduced performance for non-Pentium-class processors."

http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/release-notes/

opafire 11-07-2003 01:52 PM

any good resources out there that I could check in order to optimize it for my system?

wapcaplet 11-07-2003 03:15 PM

A relatively easy way to get RPMs optimized for your architecture is to download the source RPMs for the packages you want to install/upgrade. Look for RPMs with 'src' in their name. Check out the RPM Howto for details; you can use the following command, assuming you have a working compiler and any required libraries installed:

rpm --rebuild --target athlon someprogram.src.rpm

(assuming you have an athlon; I think the option is '--arch i586' for a generic Pentium build). Also, read the rpm and rpmbuild manual pages for more info. Many programs that you can get the source code for also have a 'configure' option similar to this.

I usually do this with anything I install. I don't know how much difference it makes, though; the performance improvement might be negligible.


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