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Old 09-10-2010, 11:00 AM   #1
michaelinux
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why debian only uses old software?


i just installed it and its all old versions of software....why?
one thing i'm really cool about is that it uses kde3 instead of kde4

don't get me wrong i'm not saying it sucks or anything i just want to know why the old software...
 
Old 09-10-2010, 11:04 AM   #2
repo
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Depends which version you installed.
If you use the stable version, only stable software is included.
If you want the latest software, use the testing or unstable release


Kind regards
 
Old 09-10-2010, 04:26 PM   #3
AlucardZero
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debian#Distributions
 
Old 09-10-2010, 05:13 PM   #4
craigevil
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"What is the difference between Debian GNU/Linux and other Linux distributions? Why should I choose Debian over some other distribution?"
http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/de...l#s-difference

The Debian GNU/Linux FAQ - Choosing a Debian distribution
http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/de...g.en.html#s3.1
Quote:
Which Debian distribution (stable/testing/unstable) is better for me?

The answer is a bit complicated. It really depends on what you intend to do. One solution would be to ask a friend who runs Debian. But that does not mean that you cannot make an independent decision. In fact, you should be able to decide once you complete reading this chapter.

If security or stability are at all important for you: install stable. period. This is the most preferred way.

If you are a new user installing to a desktop machine, start with stable. Some of the software is quite old, but it's the least buggy environment to work in. You can easily switch to the more modern unstable once you are a little more confident.

If you are a desktop user with some experience in Linux and does not mind facing the odd bug now and then, use unstable. It has all the latest and greatest software, and bugs are usually fixed swiftly.

If you are running a server, especially one that has strong stability requirements or is exposed to the Internet, install stable. This is by far the strongest and safest choice.
Debian is only 'old' if you use 'stable'. And even then you can get newer packages from backports.

$ uname -a
Linux craigevil 2.6.32-5-686 #1 SMP Wed Aug 25 14:28:12 UTC 2010 i686 GNU/Linux

kde4 is in the current "testing" which will be the next stable, it is also in unstable.

Last edited by craigevil; 09-10-2010 at 05:36 PM.
 
Old 09-11-2010, 10:29 AM   #5
odiseo77
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I've been using unstable for months (and testing for years), and the only bug/annoyance I've found so far is the update-notifier icon always showing on the tray, no matter if the system is up to date. I guess it happens when some updates are hold for stability (it's a minor bug, anyway)... Anyway, for a normal desktop pc, I'd suggest testing, and then maybe unstable; IMO stable is mainly for servers and systems that must be rock solid and 99% secure (as explained in the link posted above).

Regards.
 
Old 09-12-2010, 06:42 PM   #6
Timothy Miller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
I've been using unstable for months (and testing for years), and the only bug/annoyance I've found so far is the update-notifier icon always showing on the tray, no matter if the system is up to date. I guess it happens when some updates are hold for stability (it's a minor bug, anyway)... Anyway, for a normal desktop pc, I'd suggest testing, and then maybe unstable; IMO stable is mainly for servers and systems that must be rock solid and 99% secure (as explained in the link posted above).

Regards.
I got rid of that annoyance by just uninstalling the notifier. Don't use it anyway...
 
Old 09-16-2010, 05:52 PM   #7
alioop
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Too old? Well, I guess that's a matter of opinion. Look, XP is 8 or 9 years old and folks still like and use it. And will continue to do so for many more years to come. But when it come to Linux, an app or OS a couple of years old it too OLD? Nonsense! There really is nothing wrong with 'Stable'. Nothing at all. I'm sure lots of folks will keep on using Lenny for some time to come for their desktops not just for a server.

But I understand where you're coming from. Like another poster remarked, use the 'Testing' branch if you want an up to date Debian OS. Just wait a few months (6 or 7) and all will be good. Testing (Squeeze) is ready for every day use as far as I'm concerned even though it's not officially released. I've been a 'Testing' user for many years and I've been very happy with it.

To answer your question, Debian Stable is a bit, just a bit, long in the tooth to insure stability. And that is Debian's strong suit. Stability above all else.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 07:25 PM   #8
eveningsky339
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Debian stable has a fairly (absurdly) long release cycle. Once it is released, only security updates are provided. So as time passes, software becomes "old."

There are two ways to fix this. You could use Debian testing or sid, both of which contain new software but are less stable than Debian stable. Or, you could utilize the backports service.

Though I may dislike the long release cycle, Debian stable is the most stable Linux distro around.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 09:23 PM   #9
alioop
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In relationship to other Linux distros, I guess Debian Stable is old. But an "absurdly" long release cycle is one of the things I like about Debian. After years of upgrading and installing all kinds of OSs every 6 months I got tired of this endless cycle I found myself in.

I installed Squeeze sometime in April of '09. When it will be officially declared stable only God and the Debian folks know. And they aren't telling. But I would guess some time in late '10 or early '11. Ok so then I wait for some 6 to 8 months before I upgrade to the next Testing and I figure I'll have spent two and a half years or more on one OS. I don't know about you but that sounds great to me. And I'll bet you Squeeze will work just great for another year after that. And by the way. I started doing this way back with Etch when it was Testing. Moved on to Lenny when it was Testing and now I'm working with Squeeze.

No sir, upgrading my OS every two to two and a half years is soon enough for me. Thanks you very much. I do a fresh install, add a little time tweaking my distro and then have several years of actually USING it. I'll take a real, actually working, rock solid, long lasting Debian OS every time. And the same thing holds true for Debian 'Stable'.
 
Old 09-18-2010, 01:03 AM   #10
davcefai
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I installed stable on this machine about 6 years ago and moved to unstable within months. That was my only install. Since then I have simply updated daily and release cycles are meaningless. I always have the latest and greatest (except for KDE4, latest but what a mess!).

Debian unstable is pretty stable, with the odd exciting moment when an rogue update almost wrecks it - maybe once a year - and then a well placed question on this site gets me out of trouble.

Incidentally this install has migrated effortlessly through three motherboard changes with hardly a hiccup.
 
  


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