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Old 11-30-2012, 07:23 PM   #16
rng
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This page suggested that I include stable lines as well:
http://www.mayin.org/ajayshah/COMPUT...rinciples.html
I think they have made a mistake there.

What is the advantage of adding deb-src repos?

Last edited by rng; 11-30-2012 at 07:28 PM.
 
Old 11-30-2012, 08:43 PM   #17
Randicus Draco Albus
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That person is giving bad advice. Stable should never be mixed with Testing or Unstable. It can break the system.

Given the choice of an official Debian site and a site by a someone-out-there, the Debian site is probably more trust-worthy.
 
Old 11-30-2012, 08:43 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
This page suggested that I include stable lines as well:
http://www.mayin.org/ajayshah/COMPUT...rinciples.html
I think they have made a mistake there.
Read that entire article and look at the date down the bottom. Even if he wasn't giving bad advice would you seriously follow what he put in there considering its age?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
What is the advantage of adding deb-src repos?
A bigger download, you get the source packages as well when you upgrade.

Last edited by k3lt01; 11-30-2012 at 08:46 PM.
 
Old 12-01-2012, 08:00 AM   #19
rng
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Thanks. I have omitted the deb-src lines in sources.list.

I have installed debian testing from lxde CD. I have subsequently also installed some other packages like gparted, synaptic etc and everything went off very smoothly. However, I am not clear that if I do "apt-get upgrade" will it get all the packages from the repository or updated only currently installed ones to latest version on repository? Also, if I do "apt-get dist-upgrade", will it get all the packages in debian-testing including xfce, gnome and kde packages also!?
 
Old 12-01-2012, 08:09 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
Thanks. I have omitted the deb-src lines in sources.list.

I have installed debian testing from lxde CD. I have subsequently also installed some other packages like gparted, synaptic etc and everything went off very smoothly. However, I am not clear that if I do "apt-get upgrade" will it get all the packages from the repository or updated only currently installed ones to latest version on repository? Also, if I do "apt-get dist-upgrade", will it get all the packages in debian-testing including xfce, gnome and kde packages also!?
I recommend to only ever use "apt-get dist-upgrade" for Debian Testing or Unstable. (never "apt-get upgrade")

(see "man apt-get" for more info)
 
Old 12-01-2012, 08:53 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k3lt01 View Post
A bigger download, you get the source packages as well when you upgrade.
Having the deb-src repos activated only gives you the possibility to download the sources, they will never be installed automatically.
 
Old 12-01-2012, 08:56 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
However, I am not clear that if I do "apt-get upgrade" will it get all the packages from the repository or updated only currently installed ones to latest version on repository? Also, if I do "apt-get dist-upgrade", will it get all the packages in debian-testing including xfce, gnome and kde packages also!?
Both, the upgrade and the dist-upgrade options, will only upgrade installed packages, with the exception that dist-upgrade will install newly added dependencies if needed. To make that clear, you don't want to install the whole repository and you will never be able to do so without breaking the system. Therefore neither apt-get nor any other package managing front-end has the option to install all packages.
 
Old 12-01-2012, 11:31 AM   #23
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Make it clear...

All pure debian distributions should be considered "rolling release", as Debian itself is "rolling release" if configured so. To claim it is not is to subvert the definitions of "rolling release". This does not conflict with the claims above that a "rolling release" has some risks.

To compare, the RedHat based world (Fedora, RHEL, CentOS, etc) have no supported upgrade path without a full install of the new version. These are NOT "rolling release". Debian can be upgraded IN PLACE between releases by meeting the pre-requisits and running "apt dist-upgrade".

Debian based distros come in pure and derived: pure can use the Debian repos and can be upgrade in place between versions using "apt dist-upgrade" once certain requirements have been met, the derived are based upon Debian packages - but how close the come to Debian behavior depends upon the distribution maintainer.

Having "freeze points" during which packages are only updated to resolve upgrade and compatability issues to prevent upgrade failures and ensure the user experience makes it a good distribution, but does not in itself mean it cannot be considered a "rolling release".

Other than that, there is much said by 'snowpine' that I agree with. A rolling release always gets a bit risky when a flood of package change is in progress.
-------------------------
When advice is "old" it may no longer apply, but I would not throw it away without consideration. Some of the best advice is not time dependent.
-------------------------
For Debian: I point my repos to testing or stable, not to the release (character) name. Not (generally) to both: while I have never broken a system by merging packages from different versions, I have observed that more than a few people have discovered problems with mixmatched repos only when their system broke on update. I cannot recommend it unless you are a serious SYSADMIN and know what you are doing. I generally use STABLE for servers, TESTING for desktop, and recommend a conservative approach if you hate doing a fresh installation. (Backups will save your life some day!)
-------------------------
The OP current problem is with the repos list, but there are some nice utilities to create a new and efficient network repos list.
I always recommend installing with a wired network connection to ensure the package updates can succeed, which would avoid this issue. In this case you can also install from a netinst image, which is very small and pulls down only the latest packages directly from the repos rather than off disk. Alas, with some newer machines arriving with WIFI only the smart way is not always possible.
-------------------------
Good luck all, please remember the holiday season approaches and you want your systems stable for the season.
 
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Old 12-01-2012, 12:32 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Having the deb-src repos activated only gives you the possibility to download the sources, they will never be installed automatically.
I know, because the regular debs are installed.
 
Old 12-01-2012, 04:16 PM   #25
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpeckham View Post
To claim it is not is to subvert the definitions of "rolling release".
"Any system that can be updated without re-installing is a rolling release."
Interesting.
Perhaps your definition of rolling is a little too liberal? I suppose if Debian was not a rolling release, many non-Debian people would not complain about "out-dated" packages. [The main feature of a rolling release is nothing but the latest. Hence, continuously rolling. No stopping (freezing) to work out bugs.]
But then you may be correct. Everyone else may be using the term rolling incorrectly.

Last edited by Randicus Draco Albus; 12-01-2012 at 04:17 PM.
 
Old 12-02-2012, 01:27 AM   #26
rng
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My current sources.list is as follows:
Quote:
# Testing
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ testing main contrib non-free

# Testing Security http://secure-testing-master.debian.net/
deb http://security.debian.org wheezy/updates main contrib non-free

#Testing Proposed Updates
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ testing-proposed-updates main contrib non-free
Is it all right if I replace wheezy with testing in the security line? (I think I can, but just want to be sure since it is a security point).

Last edited by rng; 12-02-2012 at 11:21 AM.
 
Old 12-02-2012, 02:08 AM   #27
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
My current sources.list is as follows:

Is it all right if I replace wheezy with testing in the security line? (I think I can, but just want to be sure since it is an security point).
Yes and to show you proof take a look here.
 
Old 12-08-2012, 12:07 PM   #28
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I don't use "apt-get upgrade" or "apt-get dist-upgrade" I've been running Sid for years. I find upgrading packages in groups works best for me. This way I'm not getting any surprises with conflicts and anything being removed when it shouldn't.
 
Old 12-08-2012, 09:42 PM   #29
rng
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Quote:
I find upgrading packages in groups works best for me.
Seems like an interesting approach. Could you explain this in some more details for people like me who are new to Debian. How do you decide when to upgrade a group? Some basic lib files may not be part of any group (I am not sure on this)?
 
Old 12-09-2012, 08:48 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
Seems like an interesting approach. Could you explain this in some more details for people like me who are new to Debian. How do you decide when to upgrade a group? Some basic lib files may not be part of any group (I am not sure on this)?
This is were using a GUI (Synaptic) is easier, well faster, than using the command line. I basically highlight a group of packages, sorted by version (so libs get updated with their binaries), and set them to update. If any of them conflict with something, I'll save them for later. Sometimes those that had conflicts with older packages don't conflict with the updated packages, and will install just fine. If I had run "apt-get dist-upgrade" those conflicting packages may have been uninstalled. Not good if they are important, such as updating a minor package conflicts with your desktop manager.
 
  


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