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Old 06-07-2005, 05:51 AM   #1
alaios
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unstable vs experimental


Hi... what;s the difference between the unstable and the experimental?
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:06 AM   #2
zvonSully
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The packages before are loaded into unstable are loaded into experimental. After loading to unstable they are deleted from experimental(this is what I have noticed)
Now KDE 3.4.1 is not yet in unstable but it is in experimental
http://packages.debian.org/experimental/
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:18 AM   #3
sohmc
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Short version:
Unstable usually means: "Don't try it unless you REALLY know what you are doing."

Experimential usually means: "It seems to work, at least for me. Your mileage may vary."

Long version:
Unstable software (or drivers) usually refer to the fact that there are a lot of things either missing or broken. They are often released with the idea that someone will help fix the broken pieces. Using unstable software is often not recommended unless you really know what you are doing. For example, NTFS writing used to be highly unstable. It would almost ruin your windows partition.

Experimental software (which most linux stuff seems to fall into) means it's working for the most part. You may not get the fringe benefits of all the software could potentially do, but it's still well off. Experimental software is seldom dangerous (of course, there are some that are!) and are often good to use. It helps the developer find bugs, create better software, etc. etc.

Hope this clarifies things for you.
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:30 AM   #4
vharishankar
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Sorry sohmc, I think you are wrong in this context.

The OP has asked with relation to Debian's repositories, not a general definition of the terms.

In Debian's parlance I think 'experimental' is more unstable than 'unstable'. If you can really get what that means

In other words 'experimental' repositories in Debian are riskier to use than 'unstable'.

Sorry, just wanted to correct your misleading post (within this context).

Regards.

Last edited by vharishankar; 06-07-2005 at 07:33 AM.
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:33 AM   #5
sohmc
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Ah...my mistake. I didn't realize I was in a different forum...I just clicked "view new posts" and assumed I was still in "Software"

thanks!
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:35 AM   #6
vharishankar
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Happened to me today as well. I posted a reply to a thread in Slackware forum thinking I was creating a new thread in the Hardware forum.

Regards
 
Old 06-07-2005, 07:48 AM   #7
craigevil
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"The experimental distribution is a special distribution. It is not a full distribution in the same sense as `stable' and `unstable' are. Instead, it is meant to be a temporary staging area for highly experimental software where there's a good chance that the software could break your system, or software that's just too unstable even for the unstable distribution (but there is a reason to package it nevertheless). Users who download and install packages from experimental are expected to have been duly warned. In short, all bets are off for the experimental distribution."The experimental packages are automatically removed once you upload the package in unstable with a higher version number.
http://www.debian.org/doc/developers...s-experimental

"The unstable distribution (sid)
The code name for Debian's development distribution is "sid", aliased to "unstable". Most of the development work that is done in Debian, is uploaded to this distribution. This distribution will never get released; instead, packages from it will propagate into testing and then into a real release. Please note that security updates for "unstable" distribution are not managed by the security team. Hence, "unstable" does not get security updates in a timely manner. For more information please see the Security Team's FAQ.
"sid" is subject to massive changes and in-place library updates. This can result in a very "unstable" system which contains packages that cannot be installed due to missing libraries, dependencies that cannot be fulfilled etc. Use it at your own risk!"


What does the testing directory contain?
Packages are installed into the `testing' directory after they have undergone some degree of testing in unstable. They must be in sync on all architectures where they have been built and mustn't have dependencies that make them uninstallable; they also have to have fewer release-critical bugs than the versions currently in testing. This way, we hope that `testing' is always close to being a release candidate. "Debian “testing” distribution"
The code name for the next major Debian release after sarge is “etch”.
This release started as a copy of sarge, and is currently in a state called “testing”. That means that things should not break as bad as in unstable or experimental distributions, because packages are allowed to enter this distribution only after a certain period of time has passed, and when they don't have any release-critical bugs filed against them. Please note that security updates for "testing" distribution are not managed by the security team. Hence, "testing" does not get security updates in a timely manner.
 
Old 06-07-2005, 08:05 AM   #8
Dead Parrot
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Quote:
Please note that security updates for "testing" distribution are not managed by the security team. Hence, "testing" does not get security updates in a timely manner.
There is now a special security team for "testing". I hope the Debian website will update their information as soon as possible.

http://secure-testing.alioth.debian.org/
 
  


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