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Old 02-25-2008, 01:45 PM   #1
donnied
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nvidia debian testing kernel 2.6.24 possibilities


I have been following numerous threads in an attempt to get Nvidia running with the 2.6.24 kernel and Debian Testing.

So far I've found 5 main ways to do this:

1. compile a new kernel with modules_image
2. m-a (the modules approach)


3. nvidia installer
4. a build-nvidia-kernel and install nvidia-debian script combo
5. envy


5. Envy gave error messages that it would not work and the work around provided was not applicable (the directory and .py mentioned were missing).
4. The scripts failed because I could not give them the right combination of headers + kernel info which would have been solved if I had used the kernel_headers option when compiling.
3. The first dozen times I tried this it didn't work
2. m-a tossed out a couldn't compile nvidia.ko error.
1. I copied my .config from /boot to the /usr/src/linux-2.6.24 directory where I had a new kernel ready and waiting. (I had also already done apt-get nvidia-kernel-source and tar -xvjf *.gz in /usr/src
1. using make menuconfig I removed
device drivers > graphics support > nVidia riva
device drivers > graphics support > nvidia framebuffer support
device drivers > graphics support > vesa vga graphics support
(I was worried about this one...)
(I have smp enabled so I didn't have to worry about local apic)
2. (as root because make_modules doesn't like rootcmd=)
make-kpkg --initrd --append-to-version '-foo-envy-amd64' --revision '1.00' --added-modules nvidia-kernel kernel-image kernel_headers modules_image
________________________
If that had worked instead of balking at nvidia.ko; I would have been a lot better off. I saw on the nvidia forums that they were discussing this but it was for a patch and I wasn't sure exactly which file I would patch.
-------------------------
I had to edit out /sbin/lrm in the /etc/modprobe.d/ and
echo nvidia >> /etc/modules


Oh well, having made sure to

apt-get remove --purge nvidia-glx nvidia-kernel-common

#using m-a I got it ready for a renewed attempt with the Nvidia #installer:

apt-get update
apt-get install module-assistant nvidia-kernel-common
m-a update
m-a prepare
m-a a-i nvidia
#--failed with the nvidia.ko compile error, but I was ready for:

sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-169.09-pkg2.run

from the Nvidia site
and it worked and the 32 bit libraries were installed as well.
(I had tried this -numerous- times.)

I would have like a more pure 'Debian' approach but that didn't work out.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:17 PM   #2
craigevil
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nvidia one-liner is apt-get install nvidia-kernel-2.6-`uname -r | sed 's,.*-,,g'` nvidia-settings nvidia-glx && dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg (if you're on amd64, also install nvidia-glx-ia32

should work just fine. I dont run 64bit .

$ infobash -v3
Host/Kernel/OS "craigevil" running Linux 2.6.24-2.6.24.2.slh.4-sidux-686 i686
CPU Info VIA Esther 128 KB cache flags( sse3 nx ) clocked at [ 1496.264 MHz ]
Videocard nVidia NV44A [GeForce 6200] X.Org 1.4.0.90 [ 1280x1024@50.0hz ]
VIA , UniChrome Pro IGP
Network cards VIA VT6102 [Rhine-II], at port: ee00
Processes 82 | Uptime 2days | Memory 373.4/1962.9MB | HDD ATA WDC WD800JB-00JJ Size 80GB (60%used) | GLX Renderer GeForce 6200/PCI/SSE2 | GLX Version 2.1.1 NVIDIA 100.14.19 | Client Shell | Infobash v3.01
 
Old 04-07-2008, 06:24 AM   #3
dannybuntu
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Your Kung Fu is Stronger...

Your Kung Fu is StronGer.

Mine is just plain weak.

Basically we both are doing the same things.

I'm just doing them dumber. Not to mention I am unsuccessful...

Quote:
Followed wiki

1. uname -r
2. # apt-get install module-assistant gcc nvidia-kernel-common
3. # m-a update
4. # m-a prepare
5. # m-a auto-install nvidia

Error:
Quote:
Package nvidia-kernel-source is not available, but is referred to by another package.
This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or
is only available from another source
E: Package nvidia-kernel-source has no installation candidate
6. Edited sources.list to include sid repositories
7. # apt-get update
8. Tried to install nvidia-kernel-source package from sid but it has too many dependencies that might break something. (N)
9. Gave up. Will try Envy
10. Followed instructions to modify Envy here
Quote:
sudo nano -w /usr/share/envy/instun/classes.py
However, file does not exist. Sigh.
11. # sudo apt-get --purge remove envy
12. Experimented with this patch over at debianhelp
13. Searched google for nvidia-glx_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb and nvidia-kernel-source_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb
14. # dpkg -i nvidia-glx_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb
Quote:
dpkg -i nvidia-glx_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb
Selecting previously deselected package nvidia-glx.
(Reading database ... 81340 files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking nvidia-glx (from nvidia-glx_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb) ...
dpkg: dependency problems prevent configuration of nvidia-glx:
nvidia-glx depends on nvidia-kernel-1.0.8776; however:
Package nvidia-kernel-1.0.8776 is not installed.
dpkg: error processing nvidia-glx (--install):
dependency problems - leaving unconfigured
Errors were encountered while processing:
nvidia-glx
15. This has to go first:
Quote:
# dpkg -i nvidia-kernel-source_1.0.8776-4_i386.deb
*That didn't work..
16. I will try this:
Quote:
# apt-get install nvidia-kernel-1.0.8776
Quote:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
Package nvidia-kernel-1.0.8776 is a virtual package provided by:
nvidia-kernel-2.6.18-4-k7 1.0.8776+6
nvidia-kernel-2.6.18-4-686 1.0.8776+6
nvidia-kernel-2.6.18-4-486 1.0.8776+6
You should explicitly select one to install.
E: Package nvidia-kernel-1.0.8776 has no installation candidate
17. Gah. I'm tearing my heart out
18. Hopped over to linuxquestions.org and I found something
19. Going to test rickh's post
Quote:
It's always better to stay with the official Debian packages. Running Lenny, you should now have kernel 2.6.22. Check that first. If necessary install that kernel, reboot, then... this is the right way to do it.

Add these lines to your sources.list file
Code:

deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free
deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ unstable main

Create a file named /etc/apt/apt.conf if it does not exist. It should include this line:
Code:

APT:efault-Release "testing";

# aptitude update
# aptitude install linux-headers-$(uname -r) module-assistant build-essential
# aptitude install -t unstable nvidia-kernel-$(uname -r) nvidia-kernel-source nvidia-xconfig
# m-a prepare

Reboot into Single User mode, then...
# m-a a-i nvidia
# modprobe -v nvidia
# nvidia-xconfig

Then reboot back as a regular user.
20. Been at it for 6 hours. Wow. Don't complain danny. Don't think about your Windows Nvidia CD ROM (that could install in 5 minutes) ...
21. That's it. I mean its dead again. Pshaw.....



Last edited by dannybuntu; 04-07-2008 at 06:32 AM.
 
Old 04-07-2008, 06:50 AM   #4
dannybuntu
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Distribution: Kubuntu, Debian
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Hello again... Sir, could you do me a favor and highlight the steps that worked. And of course your video card model. Thanks, as you see above, I've been at this for 6 hours already and I practically did most of what you did - but probably not in the same order. So, well, thanks in advanced!

Quote:
Originally Posted by donnied View Post
I have been following numerous threads in an attempt to get Nvidia running with the 2.6.24 kernel and Debian Testing.

So far I've found 5 main ways to do this:

1. compile a new kernel with modules_image
2. m-a (the modules approach)


3. nvidia installer
4. a build-nvidia-kernel and install nvidia-debian script combo
5. envy


5. Envy gave error messages that it would not work and the work around provided was not applicable (the directory and .py mentioned were missing).
4. The scripts failed because I could not give them the right combination of headers + kernel info which would have been solved if I had used the kernel_headers option when compiling.
3. The first dozen times I tried this it didn't work
2. m-a tossed out a couldn't compile nvidia.ko error.
1. I copied my .config from /boot to the /usr/src/linux-2.6.24 directory where I had a new kernel ready and waiting. (I had also already done apt-get nvidia-kernel-source and tar -xvjf *.gz in /usr/src
1. using make menuconfig I removed
device drivers > graphics support > nVidia riva
device drivers > graphics support > nvidia framebuffer support
device drivers > graphics support > vesa vga graphics support
(I was worried about this one...)
(I have smp enabled so I didn't have to worry about local apic)
2. (as root because make_modules doesn't like rootcmd=)
make-kpkg --initrd --append-to-version '-foo-envy-amd64' --revision '1.00' --added-modules nvidia-kernel kernel-image kernel_headers modules_image
________________________
If that had worked instead of balking at nvidia.ko; I would have been a lot better off. I saw on the nvidia forums that they were discussing this but it was for a patch and I wasn't sure exactly which file I would patch.
-------------------------
I had to edit out /sbin/lrm in the /etc/modprobe.d/ and
echo nvidia >> /etc/modules


Oh well, having made sure to

apt-get remove --purge nvidia-glx nvidia-kernel-common

#using m-a I got it ready for a renewed attempt with the Nvidia #installer:

apt-get update
apt-get install module-assistant nvidia-kernel-common
m-a update
m-a prepare
m-a a-i nvidia
#--failed with the nvidia.ko compile error, but I was ready for:

sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-169.09-pkg2.run

from the Nvidia site
and it worked and the 32 bit libraries were installed as well.
(I had tried this -numerous- times.)

I would have like a more pure 'Debian' approach but that didn't work out.
 
Old 04-24-2008, 08:23 PM   #5
donnied
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Registered: Oct 2006
Distribution: Debian x64
Posts: 198

Original Poster
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Sorry I didn't see your post earlier. I hope you've got it to work in the mean time. I guess the 'one liner' didn't work for you. I couldn't use it because I had a custom kernel. I recently redid this and basically I made sure to compile my kernel with kernel headers and the image; oh yeah, you definitely need to add the modules. I ran the nvidia installer once; it didn't work; ran it again and it worked on the second try.
 
Old 04-24-2008, 10:40 PM   #6
dannybuntu
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Location: Manila, Philippines
Distribution: Kubuntu, Debian
Posts: 50

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
no problem i started a thread of my own and basically solved the problem now: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...622/page2.html

I don't want to complain or anything...I love linux - but in windows i would have figured out how to install the nvidia drivers in 1 second flat. In lenny it took me 13 reformats and reinstalls to come up with the right instruction.

i used to quadruple xp xp ubuntu and debian lenny. now its just triple. ubuntu hardy lets you click on the button "install proprietary drivers" in one go. But ubuntu is still too slow for me.
 
Old 05-31-2008, 10:11 AM   #7
donnied
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Distribution: Debian x64
Posts: 198

Original Poster
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Getting Nvidia to run with a custom kernel

Code:
su root

echo 'deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ sid non-free >> /etc/apt/sources.list

aptitude update

aptitude install nvidia-kernel-source kernel-package libncurses5-dev fakeroot wget bzip2 build-essential

wget http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/linux-2.6.25.4.tar.bz2

tar -xvf linux-2.6.25.4.tar.bz2

tar -xvf nvidia-kernel.tar.bz2

cp /boot/config-2.6.22-3-amd64 /usr/src/linux-2.6.25.4/.config

cd linux-2.6.25.4

make menuconfig
Go to device drivers and remove Riva, framebuffer, and fb_vesa
In processor type I also recommend enabling tickless system and high resolution timer support.
I would also choose processor type.
In drivers I would take out what you know you don't need (a lot of the networking stuff (amateur radio), graphics cards, etc...)
Code:
make-kpkg --initrd --append-to-version '-envy-amd64' --revision '1.00' --added-modules nvidia-kernel kernel-image kernel_headers modules_image

cd ..
dpkg --install newkernelname.deb
shutdown -r now
log back in
go to a console
Code:
su root

cd /usr/src

wget http://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree86/Linux-x86_64/173.14.05/NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-173.14.05-pkg2.run

chmod +x NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-173.14.05-pkg2.run
Now you need to exit X if you haven't already to install the modules

Code:
su root

/etc/init.d/kdm stop * or gdm stop

cd /usr/src

./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-173.14.05-pkg2.run
That should work. Good Luck.

Last edited by donnied; 06-01-2008 at 08:06 AM.
 
Old 05-31-2008, 02:24 PM   #8
JimBass
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Location: New York City
Distribution: Debian Sid 2.6.32
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Man, you guys seem to be having so much difficulty with this.

I have been running Sid with NVidia on amd64 for years without so much difficulty. Getting it installed is as simple as having the kernel headers or full source, and running the installer from NVidia. The downside to doing it that way is you have to rerun things with each new kernel, but it has never given me a moments trouble.

I sometimes run custom kernels, and other times use packaged ones. I never needed to modify the kernel config itself to allow NVidia. I'm going back to kernels like 2.4.14, and it always has worked. As long as you have the kernel source, or at bare minimum the headers (any custom kernel would have the source), just run the latest NVidia installer without having X running (you windows kids booting directly into X all the time scare me), and you'll be good to go.

Peace,
JimBass

Last edited by JimBass; 05-31-2008 at 05:57 PM.
 
Old 05-31-2008, 03:57 PM   #9
rickh
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Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
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Quote:
Man, you guys seem to be having so much difficulty with this.
I have basically given up on trying to explain it to newbies. I think you just have to struggle through it once or twice, then you can't remember what all the fuss was about. I can't remember the last time it took me more than 5-6 minutes to get either Nvidia or ATI video working. I only use the drivers provided by the Debian repos, and everything just works. It does occasionally mean that if Debian's proprietary drivers are broken, I'll have to use the Xorg drivers for maybe a week or two ... never very long.
 
Old 05-31-2008, 08:28 PM   #10
donnied
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Original Poster
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You do have to configure the two options (Riva and Framebuffer) in the kernel or it won't work. The installer will return an error message. I realize it's not as hard as it once seemed. I was just having to redo for the nth time and thought somebody struggling with a custom kernel might like it all laid out for copy and paste.

In regards to this subject I am interested in three things:
1. a guide on getting it working the Debian way without the Nvidia installer

2. a cool kernel tweaking walkthrough

3. getting Nvidia working with chroot
 
Old 05-31-2008, 09:16 PM   #11
JimBass
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In my custom kernels I've never touched anything having to do with Riva and/or Framebuffer, and never had a problem.

99% of the default choices I've left as they come, and only change things that I understand. For example, I have a built in soundcard on my mobo and an sonicblaster card. Everytime I reboot with a default amd64 kernel, it comes up trying to use the garbage built in card. In my custom kernels, I purposely remove the modules for that card, so I never encounter that problem.

You may have selected something in your kernel config that changes the default Riva or Framebuffer settings. But I am sure that in a "default" config, you don't have to tweak any settings to get nvidia working.

If you can reproduce that error, maybe we can suggest another way around it.

In response to your numerated concerns:

1) Easy enough - http://wiki.debian.org/NvidiaGraphicsDrivers

2) The full kernel is more than 300 Mb of text. Asking for a walkthrough of that is akin to asking for a synopsis of an set of encyclopedias. I'm not saying that to discourage you. There are plenty of kernel guides across the net, but there also is enough data within the kernel that you can devote a career to learning one tiny slice of the kernel extremely well, and still never get your head completely around it. There is so much data in there and it changes so frequently that even the kernel coders get surprised from time to time.

3) What are you looking to do? I'm not a big fan of chrooting, but that is from personal experience. The problem with a chroot is you need everything that could possibly be needed inside the chroot. The nvidia installer (regardless of if it is done the Debian or NVidia way) needs access to the kernel sources, to insert the module. I don't think you can have a "fake" kernel inside the chroot, it would need access to the true source/headers, which defeats the purpose of a chroot. What is it you are trying to accomplish with this?

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 05-31-2008, 10:01 PM   #12
war1025
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I didn't read through this closely so I don't know if this has already been said but:

I can never get the nvidia driver in the repos to work right. All it has ever done for me is cause trouble.

Here is how I install the nvidia driver successfully:

First, uninstall anything that starts with nvidia which you have installed via apt-get or whatever installation utility you use.

You might also need to go into /etc/init.d and remove "nvidia-kernel" I'm not sure.

Next, download the source driver from the nvidia website. It should be called something like: NVIDIA-etc...-.run
Put this somewhere you can find it easily, such as your Desktop.

Press Ctrl-Alt-F1 to get to the terminal, login as root.

Type "killall gdm" to kill the X server (I'm sure there is a more kosher way to do this, but this way works)

Make sure you have module-assistant installed (If not run "apt-get install module-assistant" as root)

Type "m-a" to get into module-assistant then run the options "Update" and "Prepare" to ready you system for driver installation.

After this is done, exit out of module-assistant

Next, navigate to where you have your driver saved (The desktop), and type "sh (Nvidia file name here)"

From here it should guide you through a series of steps. Sometimes it will complain, just choose the option to continue anyways instead of abort, and with any luck you will make it through the entire install process.

After the install is complete type "gdm" to restart the X server. If things are working properly you should see an Nvidia splash screen before the login prompt.


Hope that helps!
 
Old 06-01-2008, 08:56 AM   #13
donnied
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Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post
In my custom kernels I've never touched anything having to do with Riva and/or Framebuffer, and never had a problem.
The Nvidia installer will throw back an error if you don't. I tested it. I'll try to write it down. Redirecting standard error 2> with the Nvidia
installer didn't work.

My apologies. I had had errors thrown back at me, but I tried a test kernel just now without making those changes. It worked fine. That's good to know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post
99% of the default choices I've left as they come, and only change things that I understand.
True enough. I just read about tickless timing and how it's a great thing and should be enabled on newer processors. It's not enabled by default but amateur radio is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post
You may have selected something in your kernel config that changes the default Riva or Framebuffer settings. But I am sure that in a "default" config, you don't have to tweak any settings to get nvidia working.

If you can reproduce that error, maybe we can suggest another way around it.
Thank you. I'm not having problems I'm just trying to streamline. The Riva and Framebuffer bits are from
http://wiki.debian.org/NvidiaGraphic...44b7f7e35da149
and I have found them to be true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post
I had tried this. It is full of excellent information but didn't get things working for me the 'Debian way' but is what got me wanting things to work 'the Debian way.'

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post

2) The full kernel is more than 300 Mb of text. Asking for a walkthrough of that is akin to asking for a synopsis of an set of encyclopedias. I'm not saying that to discourage you. There are plenty of kernel guides across the net, but there also is enough data within the kernel that you can devote a career to learning one tiny slice of the kernel extremely well, and still never get your head completely around it. There is so much data in there and it changes so frequently that even the kernel coders get surprised from time to time.
ha ha . I know. I am wanting something like a 'Top 100 kernel tweaking tips.' The guides I've found are pretty basic (Top 10) or very specific (How to get the ir fly fishing module compiled into the kernel).
Yeah, you can read O'reilly's "Understanding the Linux Kernel" and learn nothing about compiling the kernel (but plenty about memory descriptors, functions, tables, and caches). I have ordered "The Linux Kernel in a Nutshell"; that promises to be a good summer time diversion and helpful. I appreciate the help text in 'make menuconfig' but 25% of the time it really tells me something I really understand, 25% of the time enough to feel good about choosing *, M, or { }, and the rest of the time it gives a sense of vaguely have been exposed to knowledge. (This of course owes to my ignorance; for some it's probably immensely helpful.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimBass View Post
3) What are you looking to do? I'm not a big fan of chrooting, but that is from personal experience. The problem with a chroot is you need everything that could possibly be needed inside the chroot. The nvidia installer (regardless of if it is done the Debian or NVidia way) needs access to the kernel sources, to insert the module. I don't think you can have a "fake" kernel inside the chroot, it would need access to the true source/headers, which defeats the purpose of a chroot. What is it you are trying to accomplish with this?
This is the exciting part (for me). I would like to have all my X and KDE/Gnome stuff in a chroot. I'd like to keep all my play stuff in a directory and system separate from my 'production' server. Keeping X, Java, and wine at a safe distance from the core system. I can run Desktops and what not in chroot and I found that cool, but it's the high demand graphic games (that the Nvidia card is for) that I'd really like to run in a chroot. I tried copying and linking some things but I didn't find the right combination to get Nvidia working in the chroot.

Last edited by donnied; 06-01-2008 at 09:23 AM.
 
Old 06-01-2008, 11:43 AM   #14
JimBass
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Kernel tweaking is a great hobby. It is very hard to find specific "do this" type of data on the kernel. The reason for that is it is tough to say specifically what hardware people have in their machines. Some things are easy to suggest (ie all amd64 processors should/shouldn't use this), but there is such variance in what else in inside (or externally attached) to your case that saying, "oh yeah, toss all the amateur radio crap" will really put you in a world of poop if you need it.

Making things as modules tends to be a safe way to go. That way if it is needed, it is as simple as modprobing it. There isn't much that "has" to be in a kernel. Support for your filesystem is one, and there are others too. But still, I like modules, for the flexibility they give you. They aren't great if you're trying to get your system installed on a tiny device, like a 10Mb flash disk, but for a desktop/laptop machine, you have sooooo much space and processing power, you can run on modules to your heart's content.

In regards to your chroot issues, don't do it. Firstly, a GUI has no place on a server. All servers should be headless, with just text (ssh) connection. If you need to see what you are doing on a server, then you aren't even close to being a sysadmin. Needing pictures of files is a bad habit from windows that should be dropped the minute you get to *nix world. Unfortunately, crutches and bad habits die slowly. Secondly, you can't have multiple kernels running at once. You can't wall part of your kernel off from the rest. If the nvidia module has to be used, then it has to be used everywhere. The only way I can see to get your chrooted environment working on a production server would be to install vmware or some other VM software, and run a graphical environment within a virtual machine. That would work, but it is ugly. Since machines are so cheap now, I suggest having a workstation that isn't physically the same as your production server.

Peace,
JimBass
 
  


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