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Old 04-09-2004, 04:54 PM   #1
acker
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Question installing debian stable, unstable ... ?


Hello people... (from the start: sorry for my crappy English )

I was reading your VERY long discussion (Is it supposed to be this hard to install Debian? ( 1 2 3 4 5 ... Last page ) ) and ... a question popped into my head. What should i install?
Till now i've used Windows (3.1,95,98 and unfortunately for a few weeks 2000, XP ( h t t p : / / w w w .newsforge.com/article.pl?Sid=03/07/09/1934259 i can not post links yet )) Red Hat7.2 (lot's of problems), Red Hat 9 (still problems with X), Mandrake (i've simply hated it), Fedora Release 1 (segmentation fault from time to time on every program that i was trying to run ) and now i am running SuSE 8.2 which really runs great. With all linux distros that i've tried till now i have had a lot of annoying problems. SuSE 8.2 Professional (that's why is running OK?) it really offered me stability. I haven't ran mySQL, a true FTP, HTTP server or something like this, but X didn't crashed, program haven't crashed, i was able to watch movies (xine for red hat9 got "stupid"), etc. But, the words that i saw about Debian were: stability, speed. So, I want to try it. I've downloaded the 7 CD's (3.0r2, stable) but haven't burned them on CD's yet. What should i do? Should i download the testing, unstable version? What do i have to download? What should i read before i try installing. I've heard that i must know a little more about my hardware. (no problem , there is time). Should i download knoppix (1 or 2 CD's i think) and install it first? I thought that if Debian comes on so many CD's has pretty everything that i need. Now i have a good internet connection. (that is today and tomorrow). After this period who knows
Another question (not to important, sorry cause at this hour i am lazy): what is a live-cd distribution?

Thanks,
aCkEr
 
Old 04-09-2004, 06:38 PM   #2
geekzen
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Just burn the first: You are obviously not lacking in bandwidth. From there you can install all the packages every in debian. You can change releases by changing the words stable in /etc/apt/sources.list to testing or unstable. Install only the base system, as the iso's are a little out of date. there will be upgrades on most everything. Most installation you will do after the first reboot. a note: When you get to dselect, dont use it. Instead, after your network is up, your first command should be apt-get install aptitude (or apt-get install synaptic for X).


Last edited by geekzen; 04-09-2004 at 06:40 PM.
 
Old 04-09-2004, 08:09 PM   #3
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Thanks.

Ahh.... now i do not lack of bandwidth cause i am pretty much the only on our hostel :. But after this week (holiday) we'll more than 100 who will start downloading garbage. . I'll try installing this night if i'll have enough free space. A question still remains. How unstable is unstable? Is it a big problem? Lot's of bugs? What about testing?

me,
 
Old 04-09-2004, 09:28 PM   #4
geekzen
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Unstable really only means it changes so often, and occaisionally a package will break (I've heard about one time a year or two ago when pam broke and a whole bunch of people couldnt log in). I've been using it sucessfully for a whie now. Just let those system critical packages settle into testing before you install them. Otherwise its much better than stable, because stable is uber stable, but out of date.
 
Old 04-09-2004, 10:53 PM   #5
macondo
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Read this before you start:

The Very Verbose Debian 3.0 Installation Walkthrough
http://osnews.com/story.php?news_id=2016

This will show you how to install woody with kernel 2.2, but the installation is the same for kernel 2.4.

Burn CDs 1 and 5. If you only use CD 1 you will end up with kernel 2.2, if you start with cd 5 you will have kernel 2.4 . So begin with cd 5 and switch to cd 1 when told to by the instructions on the screen.

Say NO to Tasksel and Deselect after you come back from the reboot, answer all the questions, configure APT, when you are back at the prompt, install x-window-system with apt-get and your wm of preference. The article is pretty detailed, you can't fail.
 
Old 04-10-2004, 12:09 AM   #6
mrcheeks
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don't use debian sid or debian experimental if you are a newbie stay with stable for a bit and then decide to move to testing or unstable. You should really get used to debian before attempting to upgrade, lots of things you don't expect can and will happen on debian sid. Sometimes you will have to wait for debian to solve it(as you must have seen unstable doesn't receive any security update,...). If a package is broken like pam you are in trouble. If X is broken you might not be able to see the gui for one or more days. If you can solve yourself mistakes made you are ok, if not you will have to wait till they got time to solve it.
 
Old 04-10-2004, 12:51 PM   #7
geekzen
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Excatly. Debian, while being a good os for newbies in stable, n testing and unstable can be a little bit of hell.
 
Old 04-10-2004, 01:35 PM   #8
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There's also a beta version of the forthcoming Sarge installer available.

http://www.debian.org/devel/debian-installer/
 
Old 04-10-2004, 01:38 PM   #9
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I'm a newbie and I use Debian unstable. The only problems I ran into are trying to get gnome without breaking my system. But I'm in love with KDE 3.2.2 and I really don't want Gnome now. It all depends on what kind of programs that you want to run for you to decide which system to run. Stable is safe, but I personally like having the latest versions of software. It's all a matter of what you want out of your Debian system.
 
Old 04-11-2004, 08:48 AM   #10
R_Shackleford
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I am new to Debian, too. (Still a Slacker.) I installed from Knoppix and then ran apt-get to update some older packages. So far, I am impressed. I'll probably be annoying most of you soon with Debian-newbie questions. (Slacker habits die hard.)
 
Old 04-11-2004, 08:57 AM   #11
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One of your questions, acker, was what is a livecd. A livecd will allow you to just load a cd and have a working linux running off the cd. This allows someone to test the software first to see if it will work with their computer/hardware right before you do a complete installation onto your hard drive. I used the Mepis livecd to get Debian unstable on my hard drive and it was the simplest and best way for me. It recognized 99.9% of my hardware right off the bat (only my printer is causing me problems and that's because it doesn't have a linux driver). I tried getting Debian from Knoppix, Libranet, sarge netinstaller, and Kanotix but all of them didn't recognize my lan and I wasn't able to get internet service, plus they wouldn't recognize my cordless usb mouse/keyboard, but Mepis did.

So try a livecd first to see if it recognizes all of your hardware correctly before you do the installation, that's the best way IMHO.
 
Old 04-11-2004, 02:10 PM   #12
geekzen
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Just remember, mepis does not support scsi drives. Not right off the bat at least. Just one of the complaints i have heard.
 
Old 04-12-2004, 10:00 AM   #13
CBlue
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Mepis supports scsi drives but you have to install on an ide drive and then set it up to recognize the scsi drives after. If you have only scsi drives, then use another installer for Debian.
 
  


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