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Old 08-16-2007, 06:53 PM   #16
mikieboy
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The printer is a HP Photosmart C5280
The URL for the driver is: http://hplip.sourceforge.net/downloads.html

From grep I get:
Quote:
grep -i printer /boot/config-2.6.21-2-k7
CONFIG_PRINTER=m
CONFIG_USB_PRINTER=m
From dmesg (just the USB parts):
Quote:
usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs
usbcore: registered new interface driver hub
usbcore: registered new device driver usb
............
usb usb1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found
hub 1-0:1.0: 3 ports detected
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:03.1[B] -> GSI 21 (level, low) -> IRQ 17
ohci_hcd 0000:00:03.1: OHCI Host Controller
ohci_hcd 0000:00:03.1: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2
ohci_hcd 0000:00:03.1: irq 17, io mem 0xcfffe000
usb usb2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
hub 2-0:1.0: USB hub found
hub 2-0:1.0: 3 ports detected
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:03.3[D] -> GSI 23 (level, low) -> IRQ 18
ehci_hcd 0000:00:03.3: EHCI Host Controller
ehci_hcd 0000:00:03.3: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 3
PCI: cache line size of 64 is not supported by device 0000:00:03.3
ehci_hcd 0000:00:03.3: irq 18, io mem 0xcffff000
ehci_hcd 0000:00:03.3: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00, driver 10 Dec 2004
usb usb3: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
hub 3-0:1.0: USB hub found
hub 3-0:1.0: 6 ports detected
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:04.0[A] -> GSI 19 (level, low) -> IRQ 19
.................
usb 2-2: new full speed USB device using ohci_hcd and address 2
usb 2-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
hub 2-2:1.0: USB hub found
hub 2-2:1.0: 4 ports detected
usb 2-2.2: new low speed USB device using ohci_hcd and address 3
usb 2-2.2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
.................
parport: PnPBIOS parport detected.
parport0: PC-style at 0x378, irq 7 [PCSPP,TRISTATE]
usbcore: registered new interface driver hiddev
input: USB Wheel Mouse as /class/input/input2
input: USB HID v1.00 Mouse [USB Wheel Mouse] on usb-0000:00:03.1-2.2
usbcore: registered new interface driver usbhid
drivers/usb/input/hid-core.c: v2.6:USB HID core driver
ACPI: PCI Interrupt 0000:00:02.7[C] -> GSI 18 (level, low) -> IRQ 20
I noticed during reboot a message flash past to the effect that CUPS was initialising on parallel port lp0.
Does that signify that CUPS needs reconfiguring to read from USB and if so how do I do that?

Last edited by mikieboy; 08-16-2007 at 06:54 PM.
 
Old 08-16-2007, 08:20 PM   #17
HowDoIProgramIt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTux View Post
I fail to see what point you are trying to make here the likelyhood of something like that happening on a Debian system are next to nil if using it properly.
The key thing being that one is, in fact, setting their system up correctly. Consider the usual way building a kernel goes; generally something like:
Code:
fakeroot make-kpkg clean
fakeroot make-kpkg --append-to-version ".ddmmyyyy" --revision ".acme.1.0" --us --uc --initrd kernel_image kernel_headers
You build the kernel image package and the kernel headers package at the same time. Those two are the ones that have to match. If you're doing kernel (non-userland) development. That's what seems to throw a lot of people.

The thing of it is, a substantial number of things - macros, API calls, and so on - changed between the 2.6.18 kernels and the 2.6.2x kernels. So, if you're using the headers only, and not the full kernel source, to build an out-of-tree module: and a number of modules have started using that approach, it saves an enormous amount of disk space: say, for example, you're building the ATI fglrx driver; that's one example of an out-of-tree kernel module that's adopted this approach - as you're using the kernel headers from the wrong version of the OS, while the driver may build, God only knows what it's going to do when you load it.
Quote:
In order to get in that situation you would need to force the install of a package on a branch of Debian it was not built for or get caught in the middle of a libc6 (glibc on Debian) transition from unstable down to testing or mixing stable with testing/unstable. Anyways we are filling up buddies thread with this when it is not relevant to the problem at hand...
While you're correct in your assertion that one could screw up their system by forcing an install of the wrong kernel, there are a number of different ways to end up with a mismatch.

The long and short of it is this: one should use the kernel headers for kernel development, and the headers that came with the glibc you're using for userland / user-space development. A lot of the files have the same names, and the include directory has pretty much the same layout, but the two sets of headers are for completely different purposes. A quote from an email from Linus was referred to earlier; if you read down through it a little more, you'll find a statement from Linus to the effect that:
Quote:
No. He really meant that you should not use the kernel headers: You should use the headers that glibc came with.
That's pretty much it. You don't need to update the header files you're using to compile purely user-space apps when you change kernels. However, you absolutely need to use the headers that match the kernel you're running when you're building modules for that kernel.

Hope that helps clear things up some; for what it's worth, until it was explained to me, I was confused as all get-out by it.

- L
 
Old 08-17-2007, 07:55 AM   #18
Telemachos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy View Post
Can someone point me to a Debian kernel compilation guide that is reasonably up to date ( I can only find oldish ones)?
My favorite is this one: http://technowizah.com/2005/12/debia...l-compile.html
 
Old 08-17-2007, 09:15 AM   #19
mikieboy
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Thanks for the links guys.
@ Telemachos: I don't understand the following statement which came from a Linux Forums post referred to in your linked item:
Quote:
Plus make sure your /etc/modules file is OK and the modules are in the right order before doing the compilation.
How would you know if the file was OK and the modules in the right order? What would be likely to happen if it was wrong? This is a new one to me. Perhaps someone has an explanation?
 
Old 08-17-2007, 02:30 PM   #20
Telemachos
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy View Post
@ Telemachos: I don't understand the following statement which came from a Linux Forums post referred to in your linked item:

How would you know if the file was OK and the modules in the right order? What would be likely to happen if it was wrong? This is a new one to me. Perhaps someone has an explanation?
That statement was in response to someone who was having a very specific problem involving one driver and a specific kernel not compiling. I don't honestly think it's anything you need to worry about. My own knowledge of /etc/modules is pretty limited, but in my experience you very very rarely need to mess with it on current Debian systems. I know that it used to be a bigger deal to make sure all necessary modules were properly loaded, and in that case I can imagine that order might matter (if b depends on a, then a needs to be loaded first), but this seems very well automated at present. Someone else may know better, but I would say don't worry about it.

Last edited by Telemachos; 08-19-2007 at 11:25 AM.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 02:44 PM   #21
HowDoIProgramIt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemachos View Post
I've found that one to be very good, too; another good one (in my opinion) is http://www.howtoforge.com/kernel_com...on_debian_etch.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 03:09 PM   #22
HowDoIProgramIt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy View Post
Thanks for the links guys.
@ Telemachos: I don't understand the following statement which came from a Linux Forums post referred to in your linked item:

How would you know if the file was OK and the modules in the right order?
If, assuming that you're using an initial RAM disk when booting, your system makes it all the way through the boot process - particularly past the point where control passes from the script running in your initrd to init on your actual root partition - then your /etc/modules is correct (or, at least, it's "correct enough").
Quote:
What would be likely to happen if it was wrong? This is a new one to me. Perhaps someone has an explanation?
The system will hang at the point that the script in your initrd (linuxrc) tries to mount your real root filesystem and pass control to init.

Assuming that your root filesystem isn't on a device that's "unusual", you're probably fine; halfway modern versions of initrd-tools / mkinitrd are pretty good at guessing what modules need to be incorporated into the RAM disk. For example, I haven't needed to make any changes to /etc/modules in order to use a /root that's on a SATA drive.

Odering is important in that file when you have a module that depends on other modules; you need to load the modules upon which a module depends before you can successfully load that module. Try typing "lsmod" at a command prompt; the module(s) listed under "used by" on the right are dependent upon the module who's name appears all the way to the left.
 
  


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