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Old 11-25-2009, 07:44 PM   #1
spyrek
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debian backup image


im happy to say i have a pretty well configured system on debian 5.0 were everything works. i am afraid to lose it all and wonder if theres anyway to make my current system in whole a dvd image that i can burn and if i ever have to redo i can use the dvd to reinstall with my config?
 
Old 11-25-2009, 08:13 PM   #2
linus72
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Yes
add remastersys repository to your Lenny /etc/apt/sources.list
http://www.geekconnection.org/remastersys/debian.html

Then, get everything as you wish and do remastersys backup mode
wherein it makes the custom livecd for you, not the distributable
I think its the first choice?

I have made some major adjusments/enhancements to my remastersys for Debian
so that it boots from usb without burning to cd
installs faster too

you want my setup just holler
 
Old 11-26-2009, 12:10 AM   #3
Dutch Master
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It's no use making an image of software that's old or even obsolete by the time you'd re-install the lot. Backup your data and settings, along with a copy of your sources.list and the packages you've installed.

What I've done:
  • set up a file server, not on the same machine (but still at home) with rsync-client installed and sufficient space to hold all data
  • install the rsync-server package on the desktop. Now you could set up ssh keys for automagic authentication, but entering a password for each sync isn't the end of the world
  • create a copy of your sources.list, as root:
    Code:
    cp /etc/apt/sources.list /home/<user>/sources.txt
  • create a copy of the package list too, again as root:
    Code:
    dpkg --get-selections > /home/<user>/selections.txt
  • issue the rsync command to sync desktop and fileserver. Note that the first time will take quite a while.
    Code:
    rsync -rdtvu /home/<user> <ip-of-server:/home/<user>/backup

1) Note that all instances of <user> should (must!) be replaced by your actual username.
2) Note that <ip-of-server> can also mean a DNS lookup in the /etc/hosts file (on the desktop!) if the server has a fixed IP.
3) Note that if you change the sources.list and/or install/remove packages you should make new copies of the relevant files.
 
Old 11-26-2009, 10:11 AM   #4
Phiebie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch Master View Post
It's no use making an image of software that's old or even obsolete by the time you'd re-install the lot. Backup your data and settings, along with a copy of your sources.list and the packages you've installed.
Especially the first sentence I absolutely agree with. But if the OP wants to, why not? Your proposed solution however is IMHO a little bit too complicated to restore in case of a mishap the whole system with one push of the button.
Quote:
What I've done:
  • set up a file server...
  • install the rsync-server package on the desktop....
  • create a copy of your sources.list...
  • create a copy of the package list too...
  • issue the rsync command to sync desktop and fileserver...
Fileserver is okay, but a second harddisk in the puter or an USB-stick or so serves as well the purpose. Even a DVD RW could do the job.
Instead of rsync (only) install rdiff-backup. Read the manual intensely 2 or 3 times ('documentation is the worst part of programming' you know). Create the selection-list of all and everything you want to have backupped (don't forget to definitely exclude the /proc, /tmp and such) and then run rdiff-backup blah blah. The first time it indeed will also take quite a long time, thereafter, run as a daily cron-job, it will be a matter of few seconds.
The big advantage of this approach is, that you can restore your working system with the simple command
Code:
rdiff-backup -r blah blah
and nothing else has to be done thereafter. It simply runs again as if nothing had happened.
 
Old 11-26-2009, 11:32 AM   #5
spyrek
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thanks for all the help, ill have to get a bigger hard drive for my server. its only 60gigs in the server my debian install stretched over 1TB, even though im sure the text files and sources list wont really take alota space. ill plan to back up at least every 3 days. thanks.
 
Old 11-27-2009, 11:03 AM   #6
Phiebie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyrek View Post
ill have to get a bigger hard drive for my server. its only 60gigs in the server my debian install stretched over 1TB, even though im sure the text files and sources list wont really take alota space.
Well, I sincerely and absolutely won't be impolite, but are you sure you understand what you have written in the original post as question and what you now state?
You wanted to have a backup of your current system in whole by burning a DVD and, when need arose, restoring it from that DVD.
Seemed quite reasonable as question.
But now you come over with a statement, that you need to backup your Debian install of over 1 TB.

First of all, even if you installed all of the 23+ kilo of packages, that a Debian distribution offers, I very much doubt that these would occupy 1 TB of diskspace. And, besides, if the system would be running at all!
Secondly, are you aware that a DL-DVD holds at the maximum 9,3 GB of data, so you would need for your 1 TB+ backup 110 DVD's??
Good Golly, burning these takes half an eternity and restoring the system from them a quarter of an eternity. With Blue-Ray, only the amount of DVD's gets smaller, but not the time, in contrary.

But you stumbled in the right direction in the meantime, as far as I understood. Install a second harddisk with preferrably 2 TB in your computer (or externally) and backup all your data to that drive. There must be a tremenduous lot of video's, pictures, mp3-files or whatsoever like that on, what you call, your Debian system.

Good luck and next time a more precise question please!
 
  


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