LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Blogs > TheIndependentAquarius
User Name
Password

Notices

Rate this Entry

Dehulled Green Gram lentil AKA Dhuli Moong dal (in Hindi) - Kashmiri style Recipe

Posted 06-19-2011 at 08:05 AM by TheIndependentAquarius
Updated 07-04-2014 at 01:37 AM by TheIndependentAquarius

Notice: Spoon measurement : 6ml

Ingredients:
  • 1/2 spoon Cumin seeds (Aka Zeera in Hindi)
  • 3 medium Green chillies (Aka Hari mirch in Hindi)
  • 1/4 spoon Turmeric powder (Aka Haldi in Hindi)
  • 1/2 spoon Fennel powder (Aka Saunf in Hindi)
  • 1/2 spoon Ginger powder (Aka Adrak in Hindi)
  • 1/2" fresh Ginger
  • 1/4 spoon Garam Masala
  • 1 medium Onion
  • 1 small Tomato
  • 1/2 spoon Salt
  • 3/4 cup Dehulled Green Gram lentil
  • Oil for frying Onion and Tomato.
Directions:
  • Pressure cook the Dehulled Green Gram lentil with Salt and Turmeric powder till it tenders.
  • Chop Onion, Tomato, Green Chillies as thinly possible and grate fresh Ginger.
  • Fry cumin seeds till they turn a shade darker and add chopped Ginger, Onion, Green chillies.
  • After the above ingredients turn golden brown, add chopped Tomatoes and fry for few more minutes.
  • Add the above fried ingredients with the remaining powders in the utensil containing the Dehulled Green Gram lentil. (No need to fry the remaining powders)
  • Let the mixture boil (without cover) for 3 minutes. Making this lentil thicker than usual will increase the taste.
  • Serve hot with boiled rice.
Serves 2.
Posted in Recipes
Views 39178 Comments 19
« Prev     Main     Next »
Total Comments 19

Comments

  1. Old Comment
    Heh, maybe this is motorvation to finally try using green lentils. So far I havent, its almost always red lentils, very occasionally yellow lentils (never brown lentils, they are awful).

    Thanks Anisha
    Posted 06-24-2011 at 03:00 AM by cascade9 cascade9 is offline
  2. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cascade9 View Comment
    Heh, maybe this is motorvation to finally try using green lentils. So far I havent, its almost always red lentils, very occasionally yellow lentils (never brown lentils, they are awful).
    Are there some "red" lentils also?? Or you meant "orange" coloured lentils?

    And BTW, this recipe is spicy, I have heard western country people don't prefer spicy food? And if you lessen the spices, it won't taste the same!

    And what is "motorvation"?
    Posted 06-24-2011 at 05:21 AM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  3. Old Comment
    More like this please.
    Posted 06-26-2011 at 10:04 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  4. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by frankbell View Comment
    More like this please.
    I hope that's not a pun.
    Posted 06-26-2011 at 11:48 PM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  5. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Comment
    Are there some "red" lentils also?? Or you meant "orange" coloured lentils?

    And BTW, this recipe is spicy, I have heard western country people don't prefer spicy food? And if you lessen the spices, it won't taste the same!

    And what is "motorvation"?
    Red lentils are orange coloured. I dont know why they called them 'red' lentils. As far as I know they are called masoor dal in Idia.

    Spicy is good! That recipe doesnt look any more spicy than dahl I make for myself. Lots of western people dont like spicy food but lots of them do like spicy food.

    Err....sorry, I cant spell for love or money. "motivation" is what I meant.
    Posted 06-27-2011 at 08:16 AM by cascade9 cascade9 is offline
  6. Old Comment
    Pun? Good heavens no.

    I had the pleasure of doing my junior (third of four in the US system) year of college in an exchange program to the UK.

    I fell in love with Indian cooking; that's the one (and only) love affair that has continued for 40 years.
    Posted 06-27-2011 at 10:48 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  7. Old Comment
    Made this tonight. Don't think I found the right type of lentils but my American grocery store had only a selection of one type.

    Absotively posilutely delicious. Susan and I both loved it.

    Thank you for the recipe.
    Posted 06-28-2011 at 11:00 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  8. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by frankbell View Comment
    Made this tonight. Don't think I found the right type of lentils but my American grocery store had only a selection of one type.

    Absotively posilutely delicious. Susan and I both loved it.

    Thank you for the recipe.
    So happy to hear this. I am surprised, how did you manage to get all the spices I mentioned here? Are they easily available there too?
    And which lentil did you use? I have tested it with Red Gram lentil, I didn't like it much. Dehulled Green Gram lentils are too tender and get mixed easily in the spices and thus taste better.

    I decided to post these recipes here since I tend to forget the ingredients after some time
    Posted 06-28-2011 at 11:14 PM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  9. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Comment
    So happy to hear this. I am surprised, how did you manage to get all the spices I mentioned here? Are they easily available there too?
    And which lentil did you use? I have tested it with Red Gram lentil, I didn't like it much. Dehulled Green Gram lentils are too tender and get mixed easily in the spices and thus taste better.

    I decided to post these recipes here since I tend to forget the ingredients after some time
    Spices should be avaible in pretty much all urban areas in the west, and all the spices you listed are used in south east asian/chinese recipes as well as Indian cooking. They've got them all on the shelves of the shops here, not that I buy spices from 'normal' shops. Its a lot cheaper to get them from Indian or asian supply stores.

    "Dehulled Green Gram lentils are too tender", not quite right. 'More tender' would be better. BTW, I always soak my red lentils for a few hours before cooking, then rinse them off. It makes them cook faster, use less energy in cooking, more tender and taste better.

    You should collect your repices, then make a 'Anisha tells you how to get stuffed' thread.
    Posted 06-30-2011 at 05:54 AM by cascade9 cascade9 is offline
  10. Old Comment
    As I mentioned, I fell in love with Indian cooking a long time ago. All the spices except garam marsala have been part of my spice rack for over three decades, and I found that at my local grocery store. If I had not, I am certain there are some Indian markets in the area.

    The lentils were another story. The bag did not specify what kind of lentils they were, but they were brown. The bag said "[some brand name or other] Lentils with Garlic and Spices." The garlic and spices were in a separate pouch inside the bag. I through them in anyway, but the the Indian spices dominated.

    By the way, I really liked the "1/2 inch" of ginger. Unconventional, at least over here, but very expressive.

    To add to what cascade9 said, one thing that has changed in the States during my lifetime is the variety and richness of choice we have in our food stores and restaurants.
    Posted 06-30-2011 at 09:23 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  11. Old Comment
    By the way, Susan's friends are asking for copies of the recipe.
    Posted 06-30-2011 at 09:24 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  12. Old Comment
    Just dropped by to say that your recipe is starting to spread in my part of the world.
    Posted 07-09-2011 at 09:22 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  13. Old Comment
    The spices Ginger powder and Fennel powder are only used in Kashmiri cuisines in India. A difference of taste is felt when the powders are used as compared to their fresh counterparts.
    Cascade said that these spices are used in Chinese recipes too, maybe, I am not too fond of Chinese food and I haven't eaten any cuisine of a western country other than pizzas and burgers, which we consider to be junk food!

    BTW, the other recipe i.e. Lotus stem might be sounding weird to both of you, but in fact, it is a staple food of Kashmir and is often prepared in weddings! I am a Kashmiri Pandit so I know a bit about these foods.

    All I heard of western country people till now was that they eat very mild food with no oil. So I was not expecting anyone here to even read these recipes! Was posting here just in case I forget 'em.

    BTW, Frank, Susan is your second wife or your daughter?
    Posted 07-10-2011 at 11:46 PM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  14. Old Comment
    Not quite what I meant, its not just Chinese food that uses ginger, its probably more used in Vietnamese/Thai/Malay/Indonesian food than in Chinese food.

    As an aside, there is actually a traditional Indonesian drink called 'Jahe Wangi' which is ginger, a few other herbs and cane sugar. Also, very nice!

    I've never had lotus stem myself, I dont recall ever seeing it sold in the Indian restaurants here. I have seen it on the shelves in Indian suppy stores, but I've never bought it. Maybe one day I will, but I'm not sure that canned lotus stem is going to anywhere near as good as fresh.

    Lotus stem doesnt sound any wierder than lotus root, which is also using in Chinese cooking. I dont think that the Chinese use lotus stem, but I know that at least Thai cooking uses lotus stem.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Comment
    All I heard of western country people till now was that they eat very mild food with no oil. So I was not expecting anyone here to even read these recipes! Was posting here just in case I forget 'em.
    No offence, but thats like people in the west thinking that Indian people only eat curries.
    Posted 07-16-2011 at 10:39 PM by cascade9 cascade9 is offline
  15. Old Comment
    Apologies for the delayed response.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cascade9 View Comment
    Not quite what I meant, its not just Chinese food that uses ginger, its probably more used in Vietnamese/Thai/Malay/Indonesian food than in Chinese food.
    Not quite what I meant, I was referring to Ginger and Fennel POWDER, not the raw forms. Their raw forms are nearly used in each and every dish in India. But AFAIK, the powdered forms are used only in Kashmiri dishes. Actually in Kashmiri dishes, no onions and tomatoes are added. There is a remarkable taste difference in the usual Indian dishes and the Kashmiri cuisine.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cascade9 View Comment
    but I'm not sure that canned lotus stem is going to anywhere near as good as fresh.
    May be not, but here we do get "frozen peas" and I haven't found any noticeable taste difference after cooking as compared to fresh peas. But the case may not be same with the lotus stem, perhaps.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cascade9 View Comment
    Lotus stem doesnt sound any wierder than lotus root, which is also using in Chinese cooking. I dont think that the Chinese use lotus stem, but I know that at least Thai cooking uses lotus stem.
    I have never eaten the Thai and Italian etc food here. They are expensive lots and also don't 'look' satisfying! ;-)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cascade9 View Comment
    No offence, but thats like people in the west thinking that Indian people only eat curries.
    Well that's true. Most Indians prefer rice and therefore prefer curries to eat with rice. My family eats Parathas/brown bread/milk products etc. in the breakfast and (rice with curries) in lunch and dinner DAILY.
    Posted 08-05-2011 at 10:58 PM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  16. Old Comment
    I thought that there was more differences between Kahmiri cooking and the southern Indian cooking than just if they use powdered gigner and fennel?

    You are right though, there is quite a difference between Kashmiri cooking and the other Indian styles. Even I can taste the difference.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Comment
    I have never eaten the Thai and Italian etc food here. They are expensive lots and also don't 'look' satisfying! ;-)
    Italian food doesnt do much for me. Theres a few things I like, but not much.

    Thai food, not my thing at all. I dont like the flavours mostly (though I do love Thai deep fried chilis)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Comment
    Well that's true. Most Indians prefer rice and therefore prefer curries to eat with rice. My family eats Parathas/brown bread/milk products etc. in the breakfast and (rice with curries) in lunch and dinner DAILY.
    Sounds nice, but I dont know if I could eat curries at every lunch/dinner, I need at least a pizza a week LOL.

    I can rarely be bothered to make parathas, mostly I use frozen ones. I probably should do some more home-made ones, maybe I'll give it another try later today. Or maybe I'll give naan another go, I've never got naan to work right.

    If I dont it will just be papadums.....
    Posted 08-17-2011 at 02:56 PM by cascade9 cascade9 is offline
  17. Old Comment
    To answer Anisha's question, Susan is my first girlfriend with whom I reunited via Facebook.

    I know quite a bit about Italian cooking. I think in some ways it can be compared to Indian cooking, though on a smaller scale. There is quite a variation across the country.

    Northern Italian cooking is much different from southern Italian cooking; it's the southern kind that most persons think of as "Italian," heavy on the pasta and the sauces. Northern Italian cooking is much lighter and is the ancestor of what is today considered French haut cuisine, courtesy of some Italian chef who was imported by one of the Kings Louis of France.

    I have not yet met a style of cooking where I could not find something I like, though I have to admit that I am completely unfamiliar with sub-Saharan African dishes, except as they may have influenced cooking in the US South.

    I look forward to trying the new recipe.
    Posted 08-17-2011 at 07:27 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
    Updated 08-17-2011 at 07:28 PM by frankbell
  18. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by frankbell View Comment
    I look forward to trying the new recipe.
    Has the new recipe failed? Miserably? Don't lie!
    Posted 11-02-2011 at 11:29 PM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
  19. Old Comment
    Edited spoon measurement.
    Posted 07-04-2014 at 01:35 AM by TheIndependentAquarius TheIndependentAquarius is offline
 

  



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:01 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement

My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration