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  1. Old Comment

    The Holy Grail for Linux users.....a USB wifi adapter that works “out-of-the-box”!

    This has worked well for me. The installation CD is for Windows and not used for Linux. I simply unplugged my Ethernet line and started up my computer with the WiFi dongle in the USB port. After I logged in, I clicked on my WiFi icon and selected my network. I then put in my password; and I was in. The speed of the connection was not noticeably slower than the hard wired connection. I rebooted the computer to see if I would have to go through the process again; but I didn't have to do anything. I just clicked on Chrome, and I was connected. Thanks again to beachboy2 for sticking with me over several posts.
    Posted Yesterday at 04:02 PM by LesBarrett LesBarrett is offline
    Updated Today at 01:27 AM by LesBarrett
  2. Old Comment
    Posted 07-23-2017 at 07:13 PM by aus9 aus9 is offline
  3. Old Comment

    Partitions - MBR vs. GPT

    I had previously read this blog entry without commenting. But having read it once more it certainly deserves a big WELL DONE! I think the LQ blog space is much under utilized and am glad to see well written articles posted here! Thanks, and more!
    Posted 07-22-2017 at 10:41 PM by astrogeek astrogeek is offline
  4. Old Comment

    Partitions - MBR vs. GPT

    Much appreciated, svg. "If careful" is the relevant phrase here. I've added a bullet point to the MBR section ("Note that it is also possible...") to address this point. Please let me know if you have any further comments on this or any other portions of the blog. Cheers.
    Posted 07-22-2017 at 03:34 AM by hydrurga hydrurga is offline
  5. Old Comment

    Partitions - MBR vs. GPT

    Quote:
    Thus the maximum partition size, as well as the maximum amount of space usable from the start of a device, in a MBR scheme is normally 2TiB.
    Not strictly true - if a partition starts before the 2T limit, it can also be 2T in size (512 byte sectors). Thus up to almost 4T can be assigned if careful.
    Posted 07-22-2017 at 12:07 AM by syg00 syg00 is offline
  6. Old Comment

    ExTiX 17.7 with Budgie Desktop, Refracta Tools and kernel 4.11.0.10-exton

    ExTiX 17.7 and DistroWatch.com

    An article about ExTiX 17.7 with Budgie Desktop is now on the front page at DistroWatch.com. Screenshot: http://extix.se/budgie/extix-17.7-distrowatch.jpg

    I guess that will dramatically increase the download numbers.

    EDIT 170713: Yes, over 2000 downloads since yesterday. A new record!

    READ MORE: http://distrowatch.com/
    Posted 07-12-2017 at 01:00 PM by exton exton is offline
    Updated 07-13-2017 at 02:12 AM by exton (More INFO)
  7. Old Comment

    Weird WM troubles? Delete that folder!

    Quote:
    And whenever I delete these desktop environment config folders, it's always because someone suggested it.
    I could have said the same thing regarding your blog post.

    Solus is a nice piece of work. I decided to take a look at it because I was impressed at how the maintainer comports himself on the Late Night Linux podcast.

    He wrote the default desktop, which is called Budgie, and works nicely. The OS itself is (yet another) Ubuntu derivative, but easily one of the better ones. Update: On a second look, Solus may not be Ubuntu-based. It doesn't use apt; it uses YAML packaging, which I've not heard of before. I'll have to look into it more deeply, even though it is built somewhat on Gnome.

    It won't lure me away from Slackware, but I've enjoyed getting to know it.
    Posted 07-10-2017 at 07:32 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
    Updated 07-10-2017 at 08:20 PM by frankbell
  8. Old Comment

    Partitions - MBR vs. GPT

    Ah, you silver-tongued LQer, you. Thanks, Habitual.
    Posted 07-10-2017 at 11:42 AM by hydrurga hydrurga is offline
  9. Old Comment

    Partitions - MBR vs. GPT

    1st blog? Really? With that extra large brain of yours?

    Nice work.
    Posted 07-10-2017 at 11:01 AM by Habitual Habitual is offline
  10. Old Comment

    Weird WM troubles? Delete that folder!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by frankbell View Comment
    I had to do the same thing today in a VM of Solus.

    When I first installed it, I tried to use the Firefox Sync and it did not work heaven knows why Mozilla didn't like me that day. Today, I deleted the ~/.mozilla directory, thanks to your blog post, restarted Firefox, and was able to use the sync.
    Solus looks like a cool distro! I like the slim black look, I used to use Crunchbang on my laptop.

    And whenever I delete these desktop environment config folders, it's always because someone suggested it. After it inevitably works... "Why didn't I think of that?"
    Posted 07-10-2017 at 12:05 AM by zapwai zapwai is offline
  11. Old Comment

    Weird WM troubles? Delete that folder!

    I had to do the same thing today in a VM of Solus.

    When I first installed it, I tried to use the Firefox Sync and it did not work heaven knows why Mozilla didn't like me that day. Today, I deleted the ~/.mozilla directory, thanks to your blog post, restarted Firefox, and was able to use the sync.
    Posted 07-09-2017 at 10:26 PM by frankbell frankbell is offline
  12. Old Comment

    Another systemd zero-day security vuln

    Code:
    root@ws1:~$ useradd 0day
    useradd: invalid user name '0day'
    root@ws1:~$
    Perhaps they should have used Slackware.
    Posted 07-09-2017 at 07:11 AM by GazL GazL is offline
  13. Old Comment
    Posted 07-06-2017 at 12:34 PM by mralk3 mralk3 is offline
  14. Old Comment

    NFS-RAMBOOT - How-To for Debian 9 Stretch

    Random note on NFS shares - it seems that in Debian 9 things can get funny if network-manager is installed and depending on the settings in /etc/network/interfaces...

    Basically, resolve.conf might be broken, which may interfere with mounting nfs shares, or the interface itself might only come up too late in the boot sequence to mount the nfs shares. This can delay bootup by the 1.5 minutes it takes to timeout nfs share mounting.

    The workaround I've come up with is:

    1) Use apt-get to remove network-manager

    Code:
    apt-get remove --purge network-manager
    apt-get autoremove --purge
    2) create/edit /etc/resolve.conf if necessary to something like:
    Code:
    nameserver 192.168.1.1
    Replace with your gateway IP address.

    Of course, if you use /etc/hosts to specify the IP addresses of the nfs share computers, then this won't really muck up mounting of nfs shares. But name resolution is critical for accessing servers out there on the internet...
    Posted 07-04-2017 at 10:11 AM by IsaacKuo IsaacKuo is offline
  15. Old Comment

    Create your own Linux distro based on ExTiX 17.5/Ubuntu 17.04!

    Softpedia 170702: You Can Create Your Own Ubuntu 17.04 GNU/Linux Distro Using the Latest ExTiX ISO

    "Refracta Tools is installed by default ExTiX 17.5 Build 170508, which you can download right now from our website, and it can be used to easily build your own GNU/Linux distribution, with a predefined set of packages and custom settings that suit your needs.

    "In ExTiX 17.5, Build 170508, with KDE 4.16.12 and KDE Frameworks I have included (pre-installed) Refracta Tools, which makes it possible for you to very easy and fast make your own Ubuntu 17.04 (or Ubuntu 17.10) distro," says Arne Exton in today's announcement."

    READ MORE: http://linux.softpedia.com/blog/you-...o-516781.shtml
    Posted 07-03-2017 at 07:16 AM by exton exton is offline
  16. Old Comment

    RAMboot How-To for Debian 8 Jessie

    If you have 3GB or less of RAM, and you're looking for places to shave some tmpfs drive space:

    1) Move /usr/share/doc onto a local drive or nfs mount, or simply delete it entirely (software updates will tend to put stuff back into it). This can save about 100MB, which is a big deal if space is tight. According to the Debian standards, all software is required to not break if /usr/share/doc is not present.

    2) Move /home/<user>/.cache/chromium and other web browser caches onto a local drive or nfs mount. A symlink will work. This can save over 100MB. Even if it's a bit slower than local ram, it's likely you'll never notice since it's still a lot faster than pulling off the internet and web browser speed tends to be limited by the speed of downloading the bits necessary off the internet anyway.

    3) Move /home/<user>/.config/chromium and other web browser config onto a local drive or nfs mount. A symlink will work. This actually might not save much space, if you don't use lots of heavy plugins or whatever. But it's nice for you to be able to resume where you left off web browsing in case of power failure. Just make sure to apt to the latest version of the web browser before running it after a power failure. Otherwise, you might lose stuff if you try to run chromium with an older version than what's in the .config save (I learned this the hard way).

    Moving the web browser cache/config off to an nfs share is a particularly good fit, because if the network is down you're not doing any web browsing anyway.

    With these tricks, you can reduce the size of tmpfs / by well over 200MB.
    Posted 07-02-2017 at 04:15 AM by IsaacKuo IsaacKuo is offline
  17. Old Comment

    NFS-RAMBOOT - How-To for Debian 9 Stretch

    If the client has 3GB or less of RAM, and you're looking for places to shave some tmpfs drive space:

    1) Move /usr/share/doc onto a local drive or nfs mount, or simply delete it entirely (software updates will tend to put stuff back into it). This can save about 100MB, which is a big deal if space is tight. According to the Debian standards, all software is required to not break if /usr/share/doc is not present.

    2) Move /home/<user>/.cache/chromium and other web browser caches onto a local drive or nfs mount. A symlink will work. This can save over 100MB. Even if it's a bit slower than local ram, it's likely you'll never notice since it's still a lot faster than pulling off the internet and web browser speed tends to be limited by the speed of downloading the bits necessary off the internet anyway.

    3) Move /home/<user>/.config/chromium and other web browser config onto a local drive or nfs mount. A symlink will work. This actually might not save much space, if you don't use lots of heavy plugins or whatever. But it's nice for you to be able to resume where you left off web browsing in case of power failure. Just make sure to apt to the latest version of the web browser before running it after a power failure. Otherwise, you might lose stuff if you try to run chromium with an older version than what's in the .config save (I learned this the hard way).

    Moving the web browser cache/config off to an nfs share is a particularly good fit, because if the network is down you're not doing any web browsing anyway.

    With these tricks, you can reduce the size of tmpfs / by well over 200MB.
    Posted 07-02-2017 at 04:14 AM by IsaacKuo IsaacKuo is offline
    Updated 07-02-2017 at 04:15 AM by IsaacKuo

  



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