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-   -   rsh issue in AIX boxes (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/aix-43/rsh-issue-in-aix-boxes-344818/)

oosii 07-19-2005 10:45 PM

rsh issue in AIX boxes
 
Please someone help me to resolve the rsh issue in AIX boxes.

I have 2 AIX machines (say sl19 and sl49) to be configured to enable the rsh connection from either way.

I add the .rhost file in all the required users’ home directory, also the hostname and the IP in etc/hosts file.

Now from sl19 to sl49 and from sl49 to sl19 the rsh is working fine for root user. The rsh is working fine for other users from sl19 to sl49 without any issues but not working from sl49 to sl19.

The following error message was noted during this unsuccessful login

rcmd2: socket: The file access permissions do not allow the specified action.

Further investigation I found from sl49 login as root user and issue the rsh command with the –l <user name> option allow me to login to sl19. But if you login as the user (not the root user) and issue the rsh command not working.

Since I need to login to the remote machine without password prompt for my testing purpose I need to resolve this issue.

Even I tried to add the hostname and the username in /etc/hosts.equiv file but that also not solve the problem.

Please somebody help me on this.

Thanks in Advance
Thaya

Jerre Cope 07-20-2005 08:45 PM

May I recommend not using rsh at all!

Use ssh instead.

It's fairly simple to setup public keys between the users that need the connection and the connection is far more secure.

http://www.openssh.org

Mark Taylor 07-21-2005 08:34 AM

usually its the perms for ~/.rhosts (chmod 600) or the reverse name look up on the host your going to for the host your coming over from ... make sure you can resolv the hostname to the ip address (and visa versa) using the "host" command from both systems ... if your doing DNS, you may want to add

hosts = local, bind4

into the /etc/netsvc.conf file so that hostnames are resolved locally before using any DNS servers.

ssh is great and secure, setting up ssh-keys also make it very usable, but sometimes you just dont need to go to those lengths for security if your hosts are all behind firewalls and accounts are secure etc... horses for courses my friend.

HTH
Mark Taylor


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