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2015 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2015 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2015. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 10th.


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View Poll Results: Linux Filesystem of the Year
Btrfs 36 9.00%
ext3 18 4.50%
ext4 289 72.25%
F2FS 2 0.50%
JFS 5 1.25%
OverlayFS 1 0.25%
Reiser4 3 0.75%
XFS 26 6.50%
ZFS 20 5.00%
Voters: 400. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-08-2016, 02:20 PM   #16
JLH993
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My vote goes to Ext 4.

I am a little surprised GFS isn't on the list though.
 
Old 01-08-2016, 03:52 PM   #17
DaneM
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Sounds good, SteveG_0001!

273: I was thinking of maybe running a VM in the background to read/write the Linux partition, and sharing it via Samba. Of course, I wouldn't think of running Far Cry 4 in a VM...that's just silly! :-D I was wondering if it would work well to just leave the minimal VM running in the background when I went into a 3D application, or if it would be necessary to shut it down. More headache the second way, but if it lets me write properly to advanced filesystems, it might be worth it. Using Ext2 and a kludgy 3rd party driver for my data drives makes me a little nervous, if you know what I mean. :-)
 
Old 01-08-2016, 04:12 PM   #18
273
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If you've a fairly modern multi-threaded CPU then running a VM in the background while you do something else ought not to cause any issues -- you can run VirtualBox and the like completely "headless" too in other words you can run them without having a GUI window and access them through either SSH, the VB GUI or something like VNC as you wish.
I'm not completely sure of your idea though -- are you suggesting running a virtual machine with a SAMBA server on it serving up ext4 drives? That would give you some overhead in the same way that any networked file system would but I can't foresee any real issues setting it up.
 
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Old 01-08-2016, 06:35 PM   #19
cowlitzron
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I voted Btrfs due to its restore utility. However, since I am using Slackware 14.1 which came out in 2013. I am using ext4 which is more reliable on older systems.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 12:37 PM   #20
DaneM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 273 View Post
I'm not completely sure of your idea though -- are you suggesting running a virtual machine with a SAMBA server on it serving up ext4 drives? That would give you some overhead in the same way that any networked file system would but I can't foresee any real issues setting it up.
Yes, I was thinking of using the VM to serve Samba shares to access my Ext4 drives. I'm guessing that, if configured right (network drives in Windows, etc.), it could be made pretty transparent to the user. Is there a better way to access the filesystems, do you think?
 
Old 01-09-2016, 12:42 PM   #21
273
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaneM View Post
Yes, I was thinking of using the VM to serve Samba shares to access my Ext4 drives. I'm guessing that, if configured right (network drives in Windows, etc.), it could be made pretty transparent to the user. Is there a better way to access the filesystems, do you think?
It just seems like overkill if you're going to be using only Windows clients then why not just format the drives NTFS? In fact, even if you'll be using Linux sometimes NTFS will be a lot less hassle to use under Linux than running a separate OS in a virtual machine to access EXT4 from Windows.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 09:23 PM   #22
SteveG_0001
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Using a VM as a file server to the "foreign" OS allows you to maintain security integrety across the file systems. Linux doesnt honour NTFS security and visa versa it also means that the disk drivers are rock solid.
With careful planning the vm uses the same uids as the real machine. You can not only access ext3/4 but also LVM file systems. I would prefer to have a home file system server for both OSs, but my sttempts on that idea ran out of money and didnt work well for either system.
 
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:23 AM   #23
jpollard
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ext4.

Btrfs, definitely not ready for prime time. Even using raid1 doesn't work well, though it works (random system hangs will occur if a mountpoint within the btrfs filesystem is exported...) Raid 5 - no way; besides the random hangs, it also gives I/O errors on perfectly valid files (it can't seem to detect a bad checksum in a damaged partition), recovery tools don't work very well...
 
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Old 01-19-2016, 03:15 AM   #24
kony
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In linux EXT4, but I wish linux supported ZFS well...
 
Old 01-20-2016, 09:14 AM   #25
mariuz
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XFS as always
 
Old 01-27-2016, 03:26 PM   #26
ozar
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still using ext4 and satisfied with it...
 
Old 01-27-2016, 11:50 PM   #27
MrTux
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btrfs is da future!
 
Old 01-28-2016, 06:13 AM   #28
jpollard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTux View Post
btrfs is da future!
Only after the rather nasty bugs get fixed. (NFS exports of a mountpoint within a btrfs filesystem cause random hangs in the NFS server... recovery tools don't always work even when a degraded mount does... A degraded filesystem can cause system hangs, I/O failures, and crashes).
 
Old 01-31-2016, 09:39 PM   #29
Pyrotech72
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ext4 all the way, even for /boot

Edit: Of 9 mounted at boot time (not counting swap), one filesystem is ext2. It's designated for swap space for virtual machines. Correct me if I'm wrong, but no journal --> improved performance. In which case I could just use ext4 and turn journalism off, but I don't know if that change would increase performance. (This is probably a discussion of another topic.)

Re-edit: now it's all ext4. Won't know for sure if performance is increased unless a VM needs its swap space. Only the removable drives are not (all) ext4. One (or more) of my backup drives is LUKS+ext3. I'm going to reformat it LUKS+ext4 before the next backup. (I really need to learn something other than tar, but at least it works.)

Last edited by Pyrotech72; 02-03-2016 at 01:23 PM. Reason: went back through my filesystems
 
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Old 02-01-2016, 01:12 AM   #30
nigelc
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I use ext4 because it came with the system.
 
  


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