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2013 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2013 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2013. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 4th.


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View Poll Results: Text Editor of the Year
Emacs 52 7.84%
Geany 55 8.30%
gedit 69 10.41%
jEdit 1 0.15%
joe 4 0.60%
Kate 71 10.71%
KWrite 27 4.07%
leafpad 17 2.56%
medit 10 1.51%
Midnight Commander Editor 18 2.71%
Mousepad 8 1.21%
nano 60 9.05%
Nedit 4 0.60%
pico 5 0.75%
RedCar 0 0%
Scite 6 0.90%
Scribes 3 0.45%
vi 51 7.69%
vim 202 30.47%
Voters: 663. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-21-2014, 09:29 PM   #76
DaneM
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I'm hoping to, one day, find a good "Swiss Army Knife" GUI editor other than Gvim or Emacs, that isn't KDE-related. I recently had to wrangle around a formatting/encoding problem involving unusual line-break characters that I couldn't see without "going ape" in the terminal. Anyone know of such a program that's good for programming and prose-writing, both?
 
Old 01-22-2014, 05:58 AM   #77
Tux!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Myk267 View Post
Can you offer some concrete examples of logical key bindings? Remember that you brought in logic as the measure and not familiarity.
Not anymore. That is what I remember from using Eclipse. I was new to Java then and I was forced to use IDE's as vi and Makefiles (what would have been what I would have used) did not well integrate work with the other team members working on Windows with Eclipse. The IDE's did the integration with maven and nexus much better than I would be able to achieve using Makefiles.
I never liked Eclipse, from the start. I had to ask my co-workers *daily* for "how do I" and "where do I find" as I found the complete UI utterly non-intuitive and confusing. The "editor" inside Eclipse was ok-ish (the subject of this thread) and offered what was needed. Of course I had to get used to the way it worked and not use ESC so often. Obvious the first user error for users coming from a vi world.
As Java was not my primary work, I just started Eclipse two or three times a week and closed it when I was done, as it is a real resource hogger. Then came a new colleague who used Netbeans, so I had other resources to ask questions. (being the only Netbeans user in the company with so little use of the IDE is a bad thing to do: no-one will answer your questions and just tell you to use what they do). Netbeans started in less that 2 minutes where Eclipse took 20. All the context sensitive menus showed what I was looking for and the editor of Netbeans was more intuitive to me than Eclipse' editor. Now that I had someone using the IDE all day everyday to ask questions my decision was a simple one. We now have two full-time Eclipse users, one full-time Netbeans user (I don't count myself a full-time IDE user) and one user that uses Eclipse for one project and Netbeans for another (something I do not understand).
The use of Eclipse is now long enough behind me to not remember what keys were confusing, and I hope not to be confronted with that experience again.

I looked at the video for "Sublime Text" and see a lot of functionality I recognize available in Eclipse and Netbeans.

Side note: there is a vi plugin for Netbeans which brings the power of vi to Netbeans, something I use at least once every week.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 11:30 AM   #78
jamison20000e
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaneM View Post
I'm hoping to, one day, find a good "Swiss Army Knife" GUI editor other than Gvim or Emacs, that isn't KDE-related. I recently had to wrangle around a formatting/encoding problem involving unusual line-break characters that I couldn't see without "going ape" in the terminal. Anyone know of such a program that's good for programming and prose-writing, both?
Have you looked at Scite and it's configs or just run though the list? I find a lot of cool apps from these LQ Members Choice Award.

Thanks all.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 08:18 PM   #79
gotfw
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by CamTheSaxMan View Post
I'm wondering what makes people choose the text-based editors over the graphical ones. Do some people run their distro without a GUI? IMO, a graphical editor like Geany or Kate has all of the features of a text-based one like Nano or Vim, plus it's easier to use with point and click.

For me, it was a tough choice between Kate and Geany, but I chose Geany since it doesn't have KDE dependencies.
There have been several excellent replies to your query but please also see post #20 above by Myk267. Search for, and read, Stephenson's excellent article, "In the beginning was the command line". Ah heck, here you go:

http://artlung.com/smorgasborg/C_R_Y..._I_C_O_N.shtml

And with that... I vote Emacs

Last edited by gotfw; 01-22-2014 at 08:21 PM.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 08:42 PM   #80
jamison20000e
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I, you see, like bloatware too. But, when you can play chess and use a dictionary and on and on are they text editors?
 
Old 01-23-2014, 12:14 AM   #81
gotfw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamison20000e View Post
I, you see, like bloatware too. But, when you can play chess and use a dictionary and on and on are they text editors?
Not to get into a "religious war" but some thoughts:

1) Yeah, all those platitudes about Emac's steep learning curve, bloat, etc. have some basis.

2) That said, the cool thing about it is that, for me at least, editing text, be it command line, configuration file, email, etc. represent the vast majority of what I do, and having a unified set of keybindings makes me much more efficient. To be honest, you can get a lot of same with Vi/m, packages like Mutt, Irssi, etc., all of which I have used in the past, but after 20+ years of vi/m, I'm finding I really like the unification provided by Emacs.

3) Whether Emacs, Vi/m, or whaterver console/command based app under discussion: Sure, you pay a higher investment up front learning the ropes, but you also get a bigger payoff on the backend in efficiency by not loosing time "rehoming" your keyboard from having to go back and forth to mouse incessantly.

My $0.02...

Peace--
 
Old 01-23-2014, 01:38 PM   #82
DaneM
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Props to gotfw: I love that essay by Stephenson. :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by CamTheSaxMan View Post
I'm wondering what makes people choose the text-based editors over the graphical ones. Do some people run their distro without a GUI? IMO, a graphical editor like Geany or Kate has all of the features of a text-based one like Nano or Vim, plus it's easier to use with point and click.

For me, it was a tough choice between Kate and Geany, but I chose Geany since it doesn't have KDE dependencies.
As for "why use a command-line editor":

1) Can be used from a terminal. Whether one is forced to drop into a TTY to fix something, or is puttering around in a terminal window, or has a terminal-only OS, this is really nice. It's faster, too, for when you just want to edit/fix something quickly. This being said, for "serious" stuff, I tend to open a graphical one (like Pluma)...but 9 times out of 10, I make edits in Vim, Nano, or Pico.

2) If most of your work (i.e. job) is done via terminal, SSH, etc., then you'll probably get more comfortable with keyboard shortcuts than with mouse movements. The mouse is easier to learn, but keyboard shortcuts are faster. Again, refer to Stephenson's wonderful essay, re: "user-friendly."

3) Some people like a distraction-free work environment. Also, some people just hate GUIs, or prefer terminal-centric ones.

Of course, it all boils down to a "matter of pure preference"--as I'm sure we've all suspected. :-)
 
Old 01-23-2014, 01:47 PM   #83
273
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I started using nano as opposed to Kate (I used KDE at the time) when I had to edit xorg.conf from a terminal to get things working. Since then I've found it invaluable for use when SSHing and I've got so used to using it instead of a GUI editor I just prefer things that way. It's easier to use when using "su -" too.
 
Old 02-02-2014, 06:38 PM   #84
j13ett5
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what about jed.
 
Old 02-02-2014, 07:43 PM   #85
$Sinisa
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For me still nano...
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:13 AM   #86
Evgenii Frolov
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Vim fore sure!
But I want to try emacs again, I must admit)
 
Old 02-03-2014, 03:50 AM   #87
xslc
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i think i'm falling in love with Nano..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 06:21 AM   #88
fabula
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pico
 
Old 02-03-2014, 06:50 AM   #89
TRK-hun
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Emacs has many features. All good for something. I gedit compliance.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 09:39 AM   #90
mpsmith
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Two: GNU Emacs & gedit

GNU Emacs when using a terminal, gedit for the gui....
 
  


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