LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > 2010 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards
User Name
Password
2010 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2010 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2010. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 7th 8th.

Notices

View Poll Results: Server Distribution of the Year
Debian 151 29.49%
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 73 14.26%
CentOS 77 15.04%
Ubuntu LTS 62 12.11%
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 1.95%
Gentoo 16 3.13%
Slackware 118 23.05%
Mandriva Enterprise Server 2 0.39%
Oracle Enterprise Linux 1 0.20%
Scientific Linux 2 0.39%
Voters: 512. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Search this Thread
Old 01-23-2011, 09:13 PM   #31
indienick
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: London, ON, Canada
Distribution: Arch, Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenBSD, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,853

Rep: Reputation: 65

Quote:
Originally Posted by gotfw
Aye carumba!! As a self professed Open and Free BSD user, I'd expect that you'd have an appreciation for, and indeed, come to expect robustness from your server platform. How the heck can you tolerate Ubuntu? EVERY time I take it for a test drive I find something broken/buggy within the first few hours (if not minutes).
Hah, yes, however, if a server needs to go up in a rush, I know I can get one up in a relatively short amount of time (at most, an hour) without having to weed out extra packages from the installer (Slackware) or wait for what I need installed to compile or spend forever-and-a-day configuring the system after it boots (Gentoo, FreeBSD, OpenBSD).

It also all depends on what best interfaces with the rest of the infrastructure at work; in which case, many of our servers are running Ubuntu, a few are Windows Server 2008 installs (Exchange - for Blackberry Enterprise Server). I would rather have 20 Ubuntu servers to manage than a plethora of Ubuntu/*BSD/Slackware/Debian/CentOS servers, as our previous infrastructure was.

Furthermore, Linux infrastructure is much easier to sell to a skeptical management when you can use phrases like "long-term support from the vendor" and "automatic security updates without reboots" (thanks to KSplice!). What I had to contend with was a butchered attempt at a Linux infrastructure, from the previous team, who made a lot of weird, illogical and insecure - yet, strangely fanatical - decisions about how they implemented their Linux ecosystem.

Last edited by indienick; 01-23-2011 at 09:17 PM.
 
Old 01-23-2011, 09:33 PM   #32
gotfw
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 327

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
Hah, yes, however, if a server needs to go up in a rush, I know I can get one up in a relatively short amount of time (at most, an hour) without having to weed out extra packages from the installer (Slackware) or wait for what I need installed to compile or spend forever-and-a-day configuring the system after it boots (Gentoo, FreeBSD, OpenBSD).
I feel your pain on the compile time for FreeBSD. Binary ready to go is indeed nice. Yet other times, however, I've wasted time tracking down strange issues because of some strange tweaks made by package maintainers and found myself wishing for a nice FBSD port like system wherein I could easily pass a flag or two to make and have things seasoned to taste. Ha! Yes, I do want my cake and to eat it too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
It also all depends on what best interfaces with the rest of the infrastructure at work; in which case, many of our servers are running Ubuntu, a few are Windows Server 2008 installs (Exchange - for Blackberry Enterprise Server). I would rather have 20 Ubuntu servers to manage than a plethora of Ubuntu/*BSD/Slackware/Debian/CentOS servers, as our previous infrastructure was.
Yep. The support and indemnity considerations are a big deal in the enterprise. Those I'm familiar with, however, may have flirted with Ubuntu a bit because it was all the rage but ultimately became fed up with it's inherent bugginess and stuck with RHEL. And there's definitely a lot to be said for minimizing the number of system flavors you need to support.

Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
Furthermore, Linux infrastructure is much easier to sell to a skeptical management when you can use phrases like "long-term support from the vendor" and "automatic security updates without reboots" (thanks to KSplice!). What I had to contend with was a butchered attempt at a Linux infrastructure, from the previous team, who made a lot of weird, illogical and insecure - yet, strangely fanatical - decisions about how they implemented their Linux ecosystem.
Sounds like you at least got some good war stories out of the debacle....

Last edited by gotfw; 01-23-2011 at 09:36 PM.
 
Old 01-23-2011, 11:14 PM   #33
indienick
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: London, ON, Canada
Distribution: Arch, Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenBSD, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,853

Rep: Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by gotfw
Sounds like you at least got some good war stories out of the debacle....
Do I ever, and there's still more to come; the decommissioning of their infrastructure still hasn't finished - it's a project my team and I are working on in parallel with our other projects.
 
Old 01-23-2011, 11:35 PM   #34
prodev05
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Location: Earth
Distribution: Unix & Linux Variants
Posts: 304

Rep: Reputation: 20
Nothing match for RHEL . RHEL the Enterprise King
 
Old 01-23-2011, 11:42 PM   #35
Kenny_Strawn
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Location: /usa/ca/orange_county/lake_forest
Distribution: ArchBang, Google Android 2.1 + Motoblur (on Motortola Flipside), Google Chrome OS (on Cr-48)
Posts: 1,791
Blog Entries: 62

Rep: Reputation: 54
Minimal Debian or Gentoo would be perfect for a server, as a server doesn't require a GUI. Red Hat also would be nice, if you could afford the price tag (and even if you can't there's always CentOS). However, don't get me started with Oracle. That's the one distro that *never* deserves to go on *any* Linux-based computer, because of Oracle's business tactics (like suing over copyright/patent infringement of something that's GPL to begin with, a clear and present GPL violation).
 
Old 01-24-2011, 04:14 PM   #36
ADxD_7
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Location: CO
Distribution: Solaris , Redhat , Debian
Posts: 152

Rep: Reputation: 23
All these slackware fanboys up in here - of all the choices given the correct answer is either RHEL or CentOS - but I would say another good answer is Solaris or at least it used to be... who knows what oracle will do to it - but currently a minimal Solaris 10 install using ZFS is really nice and in my experience the best reliability out of any OS I have worked with

Last edited by ADxD_7; 01-24-2011 at 04:19 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2011, 10:59 PM   #37
gotfw
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 327

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADxD_7 View Post
All these slackware fanboys up in here - of all the choices given the correct answer is either RHEL or CentOS - but I would say another good answer is Solaris or at least it used to be... who knows what oracle will do to it - but currently a minimal Solaris 10 install using ZFS is really nice and in my experience the best reliability out of any OS I have worked with
Yep. But you need to be ready to sell a kidney to afford the support. And you can no longer use it for free without said paid support. I think it's already been made abundantly clear what Oracle intends for Solaris: 1) top 5% of large enterprises are the target market, 2) the rest of us are not worth the time of day to Oracle.
 
Old 01-24-2011, 11:09 PM   #38
Kenny_Strawn
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Location: /usa/ca/orange_county/lake_forest
Distribution: ArchBang, Google Android 2.1 + Motoblur (on Motortola Flipside), Google Chrome OS (on Cr-48)
Posts: 1,791
Blog Entries: 62

Rep: Reputation: 54
Well when I said Oracle in that post, I meant Oracle EL Anything created by a business that's opposed to FOSS (or for the purpose of exploiting it), even if it is Linux at the core, is just *disgusting*.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 12:39 PM   #39
tallship
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: On the Beaches of Super Sunny Southern San Clemente, California USA
Distribution: Slackware - duh!
Posts: 520
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
Exclamation

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADxD_7 View Post
All these slackware fanboys up in here
yeah, how 'bout that? We're everywhere - there is no escaping - we will not be assimilated

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADxD_7 View Post
- of all the choices given the correct answer is either RHEL or CentOS - but I would say another good answer is Solaris or at least it used to be... who knows what oracle will do to it
um... Okay I think you're getting a little off-track here. These polls are for open source software (for the most part, with rare exceptions for items like Skype, for example), and primarily, you'll note that most choices are FOSS.

While open source, RH IMNSHO, is most certainly not FOSS - as pointed out below, it isn't even free to use unless you pay and subscribe.

We already know what's going on with Solaris 11. As soon as the usurpation of Sun was in full swing, and not even complete, EllisonCo reverted the "Free" license for Solaris 10 back to non-free.

OpenSolaris (Now, arguably IllumOS), was Open Source, and Free - meaning FOSS.

Because it is GNU/Linux, and perhaps that being the only reason (I don't make these polls, just offer my input), RHEL is listed here - but it ain't FOSS.

Now, CentOS, that's FOSS

And, regarding RHEL, as @gotfw pointed out to you:

Quote:
Originally Posted by gotfw View Post
Yep. But you need to be ready to sell a kidney to afford the support. And you can no longer use it for free without said paid support.
So... (heh.) if it's GPL'd, then... I can't distribute it to others and run it for free if I get a copy?

heh. Yeah, buddy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gotfw View Post
I think it's already been made abundantly clear what Oracle intends for Solaris: 1) top 5% of large enterprises are the target market, 2) the rest of us are not worth the time of day to Oracle.
@ADxD_7, I think we've covered those bases now, although perhaps IllumOS 'should' have been in this poll.

I don't have any argument whatsoever with you on how biotchin' Solaris is - I agree. And aside from not being a subscriber to the rpm camp since Redhat 5.2, I believe either SuSE or CentOS would be the distros I would prefer if the criteria for selection were that of an rpm based distro, but come on man, RHEL is Redmond in the making all over again.

Last edited by tallship; 01-25-2011 at 12:41 PM. Reason: fix quote - make pretty :)
 
Old 01-25-2011, 01:36 PM   #40
gotfw
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Posts: 327

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallship View Post
yeah, how 'bout that? We're everywhere - there is no escaping - we will not be assimilated



...snip...

OpenSolaris (Now, arguably IllumOS), was Open Source, and Free - meaning FOSS.
One minor correction here, the heir apparent FOSS successor to OpenSolaris is now arguably OpenIndiana. IllumOS is ON integration, and more akin to the Linux kernel than "distro".

OpenIndiana aims to be an IllumOS based open Solaris distribution. There are others, e.g. Schillix, Belenix, etc., but OI intends to take up the mantle as FOSS continuation of OpenSolaris (the Sun binary distribution - note the absence of a space between Open and Solaris - formerly code named Indiana) and utilizes the IPS packaging system (Schillix, by contrast opts for SRV4).

Despite it's promises, Sun never did reach the holy grail of a true FOSS offering and OpenSolaris contained much closed, proprietary binaries. IllumOS and OI have been working on remedying this and OI has reportedly pretty stable dev release 148 being used in production, with talk of a minimal stable release targeting server use (fewer packages to worry about) being released in very near future. This is not yet IllumOS based, however, and there is also discussion of postponing until after full IllumOS integration, but this would necessitate delaying release some number of months.

Yeah, I know it's not Linux, but hopefully still of use/interest.

Last edited by gotfw; 01-25-2011 at 01:38 PM.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 02:50 PM   #41
goossen
Member
 
Registered: May 2006
Location: Bayern, Germany
Distribution: Many
Posts: 224

Rep: Reputation: 41
Slackware, no doubts!
 
Old 01-25-2011, 03:54 PM   #42
eveningsky339
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Western Maine
Distribution: PCLinuxOS (LXDE)
Posts: 466

Rep: Reputation: 51
FOSS doesn't mean free of charge. Even Stallman has said that he wouldn't mind making money with open source software. FOSS means open code that anyone can modify and redistribute.

Look at RHEL for example. Does it have a hefty pricetag? Yes. But, it's also open source, which is why "clones" such as CentOS and Scientific Linux are available free of charge.

When a piece of open-source software requires a fee to use, a free clone will invariably arise.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 03:55 PM   #43
Sayan Acharjee
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Location: Bangalore, India
Distribution: Linux Mint 13
Posts: 590

Rep: Reputation: 64
Rhel
 
Old 01-25-2011, 05:40 PM   #44
ADxD_7
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Location: CO
Distribution: Solaris , Redhat , Debian
Posts: 152

Rep: Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by gotfw View Post
Yep. But you need to be ready to sell a kidney to afford the support. And you can no longer use it for free without said paid support. I think it's already been made abundantly clear what Oracle intends for Solaris: 1) top 5% of large enterprises are the target market, 2) the rest of us are not worth the time of day to Oracle.
Ya I know.... The company I work for is a Solaris shop and has to pay Oracle per machine since we cannot totally switch to Linux because of SPARC architecture(endianness issues). We are slowly moving to Linux but the distribution has not been decided upon yet, I will be the one to make the decision so it will be CentOS...... or I guess I need to give Slackware a go eh?
 
Old 01-25-2011, 05:57 PM   #45
tallship
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: On the Beaches of Super Sunny Southern San Clemente, California USA
Distribution: Slackware - duh!
Posts: 520
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADxD_7 View Post
Ya I know.... The company I work for is a Solaris shop and has to pay Oracle per machine since we cannot totally switch to Linux because of SPARC architecture(endianness issues). We are slowly moving to Linux but the distribution has not been decided upon yet, I will be the one to make the decision so it will be CentOS...... or I guess I need to give Slackware a go eh?
I feel your pain! I'm a Solaris lover myself, and we're all left out there twirling in the wind, being treated like rusty windchimes.

If an rpm based distro is required, CentOS would certainly have my vote, but...

When I think in terms of stability, the distros that come to mind are (w/o deference to the BSDs):

  • Slackware (official releases)
  • Debian (stable)
  • CentOS (if it must be an rpm based distro)
When I think in terms of stability while staying in the bleeding edge of technology (In case you believe you can actually have your cake and eat it too):

  • Slackware (-current)
  • Arch Linux
  • Debian (squeeze)
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Server Distribution of the Year jeremy 2009 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards 41 06-29-2010 02:11 PM
Server Distribution of the Year jeremy 2008 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards 62 02-14-2009 01:06 AM
Server Distribution of the Year jeremy 2007 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards 46 05-08-2008 09:28 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:11 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration