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2009 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2009 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2009. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 9th.

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View Poll Results: Programming Language of the Year
PHP 80 13.75%
Perl 48 8.25%
Python 160 27.49%
Ruby 26 4.47%
C 79 13.57%
C++ 81 13.92%
Java 52 8.93%
Lisp 5 0.86%
Erlang 4 0.69%
Smalltalk 0 0%
Haskell 1 0.17%
C# 13 2.23%
Lua 7 1.20%
COBOL 4 0.69%
Scheme 2 0.34%
Go 10 1.72%
Groovy 4 0.69%
Fortran 4 0.69%
R 2 0.34%
Voters: 582. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-18-2010, 08:44 PM   #46
MrCode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick
Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex
i hicge i hbbe hwt hit nime, mīn drihten.
Що?
Okay, what (spoken) language is that? (If they're both the same) Google Translate doesn't detect it properly.

I take it it's probably an Eastern European language (or maybe Northern)?

EDIT: actually I think the second one ("Що?") is a Cyrillic language (e.g. Russian...?)

Quote:
As long as you don't use platform-specific libraries, and issue commands through the system() function in C or C++ - or Runtime.getRuntime.exec() in Java - or hard-coding pathnames, you should be fine.
...or get lazy about it and use #ifdef

Last edited by MrCode; 01-18-2010 at 08:50 PM.
 
Old 01-18-2010, 10:51 PM   #47
sycamorex
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Quote:
Що?
It's an English speaking forum so let's stick to English

Quote:
Okay, what (spoken) language is that? (If they're both the same) Google Translate doesn't detect it properly.

I take it it's probably an Eastern European language (or maybe Northern)?
My sentence was actually in English as spoken/written a looooong time ago
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_English
As my OE is a little bit rusty now, it might contain some minor grammatical errors in declination/conjugation.

It shouldn't take much googling to translate it into modern English though

Last edited by sycamorex; 01-18-2010 at 11:01 PM.
 
Old 01-18-2010, 11:52 PM   #48
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
It's an English speaking forum so let's stick to English



My sentence was actually in English as spoken/written a looooong time ago
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_English
As my OE is a little bit rusty now, it might contain some minor grammatical errors in declination/conjugation.

It shouldn't take much googling to translate it into modern English though

So what's hicge? I can understand the rest (had to look drihten up).
 
Old 01-19-2010, 02:01 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster View Post
So what's hicge? I can understand the rest (had to look drihten up).
Didn't I say my Old English was rusty?
It was supposed to be 'hycge'
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hycgan
 
Old 01-19-2010, 02:07 AM   #50
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Actually, hicge might be an alternative spelling of hycge
http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oe_bo...ler/b0535.html
Quote:
hicgan. v. hycgan.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 09:35 AM   #51
indienick
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I know it's an English speaking forum, sycamorex, BUT YOU STARTED IT!!!!

Code:
Що (pron. shcho - trans. "What")
...is Ukrainian, MrCode. For what it's worth, in Russian it would be "Што" (pron. shto). Close, though.

So, digressions aside, Lisp for the win!
 
Old 01-19-2010, 10:49 AM   #52
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
I know it's an English speaking forum, sycamorex, BUT YOU STARTED IT!!!!
Excuse me?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
Tho...you think you have what it taketh to learn Lithp, do you? Hee hee.
You asked me a question using some words/inflectional endings borrowed from the Middle English/Early Modern English. I just went a few hundred years further in time and answered your question in Old English I've never stepped out of the boundaries of the English language,LOL


Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick View Post
So, digressions aside, Lisp for the win!
Agreed. Lisp ftw!!!

I've read a lot of good things ABOUT Lisp. I remember Keith Curtis dwelled on it in his book 'After the Software Wars'. People praise it a lot so I'd love to learn it. I have already started reading its documentation. Why is it that it seems a niche language, if it's so great? I mean it's nowhere near as popular as C(x), Java, etc. I realise that if something is popular it doesn't necessarily mean it's 'better', but why do employers not require lisp knowledge (as opposed to other more popular languages)? I'm not talking about scripting languages here as I know you wouldn't write a short script in Java/C either. Does lisp lack some functionality? Is it ONLY good for certain tasks (eg. AI)?
I realise my questions may sound rather naive and show my lack of knowledge in that area, but that's actually the case.

Lisp ē mid sīe (OE: Lisp be with you) LOL

Last edited by sycamorex; 01-19-2010 at 10:53 AM.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 10:57 AM   #53
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
Didn't I say my Old English was rusty?
It was supposed to be 'hycge'
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hycgan
That's kind of what I guessed it meant. :}
 
Old 01-19-2010, 11:46 AM   #54
indienick
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I was actually trying to type with a speech impediment, but okay!

As for why Lisp isn't all that popular - my opinion on the matter is that its mainstream presence flourished in the 1980s when the "AI boom" happened, and you had companies like Symbolics coming out with Lisp Machines (oh, what I would give to get my hands on one or have the time to build one). With that, you could see how the association of Lisp-to-AI could be assumed; and given Lisp's age, it was around before and during the time where you had popular, niche languages like COBOL and APL. It is almost natural that it would have become stereotyped.

Furthermore, it has some pretty weird syntax (ie. macro quoting) and some sub-languages (ie. LOOP) built in to the ANSI standard; it's a dense language.

For me, it's largest failing, especially in this day in age, is that there are very few decent, easy to use GUI libraries - and the ones that are easier to use do not have many of the features, or aesthetic appeal, that toolkits like GTK and Qt have.

However, I have pre-ordered Conrad Barski's new book Land of Lisp and I hope to glean some gems of knowledge from it. I definitely think it would be a good place to start, if you are interested in learning, sycamorex. Also, I suggest you check out Peter Seibel's Practical Common Lisp.

Last edited by indienick; 01-19-2010 at 11:47 AM.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 12:11 PM   #55
sycamorex
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Quote:
I was actually trying to type with a speech impediment, but okay!
ROTFL

I'm going to order The Land of Lisp in March when it's released. For the time being I am going to use Practical Common Lisp.
How do lisp dialects compare? Is Common Lisp a recommended version? What about the Emacs implementation of Lisp? I'm like a linux newbie asking: OMG! There are so many distros. Which one is best? LOL
What about IDE/editor: I'm happy with emacs - is there anything better for lisp?

Thanks

btw, sorry for digressing. If that's too much, please move the lisp stuff to a more appropriate place.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 12:21 PM   #56
indienick
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Emacs is, IMO, the best Lisp-aware text editor out there. Common Lisp is the latest reincarnation of Lisp - at this point it boils down to picking an implementation. I would suggest CLISP, then perhaps SBCL.

Emacs Lisp (ELisp) is a REALLY stripped-down, subset of Common Lisp.

For some other Lisp-aware editors, there is ABLE and Climacs.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 12:28 PM   #57
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Thanks a lot.
 
Old 01-19-2010, 03:08 PM   #58
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No problemo!
 
Old 01-19-2010, 11:16 PM   #59
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Where's Javascript? No AJAX without JS and most new web is AJAX.
 
Old 01-20-2010, 10:53 AM   #60
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Java baby, cause there's none better
 
  


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