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2009 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2009 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2009. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 9th.

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View Poll Results: Desktop Distribution of the Year
Ubuntu 343 30.17%
Fedora 111 9.76%
Debian 101 8.88%
openSuse 68 5.98%
Slackware 190 16.71%
SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 3 0.26%
Mandriva 46 4.05%
Gentoo 43 3.78%
MEPIS 19 1.67%
Linux Mint 93 8.18%
Arch 59 5.19%
PClinuxOS 28 2.46%
Zenwalk 7 0.62%
VectorLinux 5 0.44%
Freespire 0 0%
gOS 0 0%
Sabayon 6 0.53%
Puppy 15 1.32%
Voters: 1137. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-17-2010, 12:41 AM   #211
gotfw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStarLion View Post
Personally, I think Ubuntu is one of the ones good for people new to it, but once they've got the idea, move to something else. Alright, you'll have to learn some more, and learn some things over again, but once you've got that down pat, try something else. And then again.
So far, for me, I've currently stopped at Slackware, because I'm learning more from it than I have any other... and interestingly it seems to run far quicker and far better than any of the others. That's not to say I won't find some other distro later that won't grab my attention for a bit.

(Though Slackware has supplanted Debian systems as the one to keep coming back to, now.)
Funny because for me it is just the opposite - Debian has supplanted Slack. I've got plenty of experience rolling my own. Was a cool thing to do once upon a time. But now I've got better things to do with my time. So my preferences favor something like Debian that JFW OOB and is rock solid stable.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 01:28 AM   #212
tallship
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Gotta luv it!

Slackware receives a SOLID second place in the polls

Just goes to show you that there's no supplanting a Real traditional UNIX style Linux Distro.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 07:36 AM   #213
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I guess if we added it up all way back to the beginning, Slackware won most points right?


Few others where there when it was Young, yet even fewer are still live while it has matured .

I give Slax to friends, instead of "UB" it works 'like a charm" and easy transforms from USB to CD "offline" need it be , while able to fit to ram (free the burner tray) if CD booted...
 
Old 02-17-2010, 02:20 PM   #214
tallship
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Exclamation

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCerovec View Post

Few others where there when it was Young, yet even fewer are still live while it has matured .
Technically speaking, was either the third or fourth Linux distro that was spun, depending upon your point of view, and *none* of the others are still alive

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCerovec View Post

I give Slax to friends, instead of "UB" it works 'like a charm" and easy transforms from USB to CD "offline" need it be , while able to fit to ram (free the burner tray) if CD booted...
Y'know, I've been looking at Slax. And it appears to have a nice, fast, and simple bundle/install. I'm going to have to give it a shot and check it out as a quick and easy solution for n00bs.

When all those people ask, "What's a good first distro?", I say Slackware, but then all the hyperbole begins when people respond about how easy debuntu is (it isn't - but were I to recommend a deb, it would be deb itself and not ubuntu).

What could be easier than using pkgtool (but only for those who are afraid to simply add a package in three seconds on the command line)?

And oh, the dependancy hell with RPM based distros! Especially once they get to be a couple of years old and you can't find updates!

I've been playing with SalixOS lately, for those who want dependency checking, and it indeed admins just like Slack yet installs very fast!

But for the full on n00b, I'm thinking your right on the money with Slax, especially regarding what I'm sure many begin to fear when they see the rather spartan (we call it classic) 'look' of slackware.com, as opposed to the n00b-friendly aesthetics of the Slax site

Hey c'mon folks! There's a right way to learn about UNIX! And it involves using a flavor from among the Unices that are the most closely adherant to standard, classic, UNIX - be it SVR4ish or BSDish; and that means the logical choices would be Solaris, xBSD, or with regards to the GNU/Linux flavor of Unices, Slackware, as the obvious distro of choice.

Once you learn UNIX by using Slackware or, say, FreeBSD, you know and are able to use UNIX. When you use one of the other, say an RPM based distro, you're locked into that way of doing things, w/o actually having a real understanding and working knowledge of basic UNIX administration.

Not to knock SuSE, coz I really liked their take on 'hitchiker' and '42', also the fact that SuSE's true historic roots are actually really that of simply a "German version of Slackware", but 'Yast" does stand for, "Yet another..."

And if, for some reason, someone actually insists on installing software from an rpm... Well, Slackware supports that too out of the box

When something breaks on a machine, the administrator (translated as 'user', when the 'user' is the owner of a laptop or desktop workstation) needs to be able to have at least 'some idea' of how to fix the problem, or approach fixing the problem.

When that admin has learned on Slackware, it doesn't really matter which distro they migrate too, because they have that introductory experience on such a basic flavor of UNIX. When someone starts, say, on Redhat, it's very likely they'll have to relearn all over again how Unices are really laid out and operate once they attempt to migrate away to a different distro of Linux.

Anyone who has based their basic UNIX operating skills on something like Slackware or FreeBSD can almost immediately assimilate the usage of a fancy GUI installer or administrative tool of another platform, yet, when the use of that fancy tool isn't going to cut the mustard in fixing what is wrong, that user can immediately abandon the convenient, proprietaryish tool and simply go to a file, edit it in ten seconds, and voila! Up and running again!

Again, from what you've said about Slax, and from what I've seen of it, it is a distro that actually provides both worlds out of the box for those who aren't willing or inclined to take two or three days to *initially* learn basic UNIX commands and operating skills.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 02:50 PM   #215
MBybee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallship View Post

Anyone who has based their basic UNIX operating skills on something like Slackware or FreeBSD can almost immediately assimilate the usage of a fancy GUI installer or administrative tool of another platform, yet, when the use of that fancy tool isn't going to cut the mustard in fixing what is wrong, that user can immediately abandon the convenient, proprietaryish tool and simply go to a file, edit it in ten seconds, and voila! Up and running again!
Sadly, this isn't really all that true. Some of the distros (and they know who they are) make a point of breaking classic Unix/POSIX standards in order to make things more 'user friendly'. In these cases only their own tools will restore the system to its normal operation - and anything will require basically rebuilding it.

Try tweaking underlying packages in Ubuntu some time and watch it completely de-install itself as an example.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 04:16 PM   #216
SCerovec
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBybee View Post
Sadly, this isn't really all that true. Some of the distros (and they know who they are) make a point of breaking classic Unix/POSIX standards in order to make things more 'user friendly'. In these cases only their own tools will restore the system to its normal operation - and anything will require basically rebuilding it.

Try tweaking underlying packages in Ubuntu some time and watch it completely de-install itself as an example.
There (in the wild) seem to be "roll their own" true RTFM-ers and clever copy-cats pretending to be some...


The first survive the atrocities of sysV and various system wide managers hiding configuration(s) in perl and /etc/sysconfig, /usr/lib/<some path> (et. cetera) even long enough to build eventually compliant packages going to official repositories.

The later, pretending all Distros are like UNIX (which, bu far they are not) go doing "fixes" with /etc/rc.d/rc.local; failing short to understand before managing.

But of course, we knew this all before ;^), didn't we?

I was "captured" by how Slax elegantly implements squash fs to put all packages in layers, thereby keeping the system entropy actually zero.

All changes are contained in the last (top most) layer with a option to save or disregard it.

*dream come true*
 
Old 02-17-2010, 05:37 PM   #217
MBybee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCerovec View Post
There (in the wild) seem to be "roll their own" true RTFM-ers and clever copy-cats pretending to be some...


The first survive the atrocities of sysV and various system wide managers hiding configuration(s) in perl and /etc/sysconfig, /usr/lib/<some path> (et. cetera) even long enough to build eventually compliant packages going to official repositories.

The later, pretending all Distros are like UNIX (which, bu far they are not) go doing "fixes" with /etc/rc.d/rc.local; failing short to understand before managing.

But of course, we knew this all before ;^), didn't we?

I was "captured" by how Slax elegantly implements squash fs to put all packages in layers, thereby keeping the system entropy actually zero.

All changes are contained in the last (top most) layer with a option to save or disregard it.

*dream come true*
Call it what you like, the fact of the matter is that if you try to upgrade Gimp to 2.6 on an Ubuntu distro that doesn't ship with it, you will find yourself stuck in a dependency hell.

Some Linux distros have ended up working so hard to emulate Windows that they have introduced every problem that caused people to leave it in the first place. I'll stick to my FreeBSD system, TYVM
 
Old 02-17-2010, 05:44 PM   #218
tallship
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBybee View Post
Sadly, this isn't really all that true. Some of the distros (and they know who they are) make a point of breaking classic Unix/POSIX standards in order to make things more 'user friendly'. In these cases only their own tools will restore the system to its normal operation - and anything will require basically rebuilding it.

Try tweaking underlying packages in Ubuntu some time and watch it completely de-install itself as an example.
heh. No thanks If I wanted deb I'd use deb (sometimes do) and not debuntu

But yes, you are correct and that is why I left the Redhat camp after RH 5.2, returning to my Slackware roots (on the Linux side of things).

Hey! Remember Unifix Linux? um... German, If I remember correctly. They claimed to be the first distro to be completely POSIX compliant. A little rickety, but it was a nice effort back in the day when Linux standards began to take hold - and yet something as popular as debuntu goes and does what you pointed out. Jeez!

hm... BTW, I see you're a FreeBSD user too. Kewl
 
Old 02-17-2010, 05:55 PM   #219
MBybee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallship View Post
heh. No thanks If I wanted deb I'd use deb (sometimes do) and not debuntu

But yes, you are correct and that is why I left the Redhat camp after RH 5.2, returning to my Slackware roots (on the Linux side of things).

Hey! Remember Unifix Linux? um... German, If I remember correctly. They claimed to be the first distro to be completely POSIX compliant. A little rickety, but it was a nice effort back in the day when Linux standards began to take hold - and yet something as popular as debuntu goes and does what you pointed out. Jeez!

hm... BTW, I see you're a FreeBSD user too. Kewl
Unified Linux was such a good idea - POSIX and other such standards are important.

Yes - FreeBSD since 2.2.1, IRIX/VMS and such before that.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 05:55 PM   #220
tallship
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[quote=MBybee;3867412] ...the fact of the matter is that if you try to upgrade Gimp to 2.6 on an Ubuntu distro that doesn't ship with it, you will find yourself stuck in a dependency hell.[quote]

ah yes... I remember the hours spent in dependency hell over at rpmfind.net

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBybee View Post
Some Linux distros have ended up working so hard to emulate Windows that they have introduced every problem that caused people to leave it in the first place. I'll stick to my FreeBSD system, TYVM
Gotta love BSD - even NetBSD, although it's become kind of antiquated from the wars and lack of maintenance.

At the risk of starting a flame war with you though, I've been very happy with the progress of DragonFlyBSD and have been running that since Matthew released the first betas. And I love HammerFS! For me, it's right up there with XFS.

In fact, the only 'problem' I've been having with FreeBSD, when I want to install it somewhere, is the occasional lack of binaries due to the Linux craze and lack of people porting 'some' daemons. For example, for a while, I couldn't reliably run Asterisk on BSD for that very reason. There just wasn't enough support initially for it.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 06:00 PM   #221
MBybee
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[QUOTE=tallship;3867431][quote=MBybee;3867412] ...the fact of the matter is that if you try to upgrade Gimp to 2.6 on an Ubuntu distro that doesn't ship with it, you will find yourself stuck in a dependency hell.
Quote:

ah yes... I remember the hours spent in dependency hell over at rpmfind.net



Gotta love BSD - even NetBSD, although it's become kind of antiquated from the wars and lack of maintenance.

At the risk of starting a flame war with you though, I've been very happy with the progress of DragonFlyBSD and have been running that since Matthew released the first betas. And I love HammerFS! For me, it's right up there with XFS.

In fact, the only 'problem' I've been having with FreeBSD, when I want to install it somewhere, is the occasional lack of binaries due to the Linux craze and lack of people porting 'some' daemons. For example, for a while, I couldn't reliably run Asterisk on BSD for that very reason. There just wasn't enough support initially for it.
No cause for a flameware (and they are reasonably rare here) - I like most of the *BSD tree (though I don't think trustedBSD is going anywhere), and at least BSD people can agree on system architecture for the most part.
 
Old 02-23-2010, 11:31 AM   #222
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The largest community of ubuntu keeps it in rank 1. last year also the same.
 
Old 03-02-2010, 06:29 PM   #223
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Oddly enough I just heard about MCA but I never imagined Slackware to get second place for Desktop Distribution of the Year! Sweet!

Congratulations to ALL Slackware developers and users for this incredible ranking! Outstanding indeed!
 
Old 03-02-2010, 06:53 PM   #224
lupusarcanus
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I don't think Slackware is good for n00bs. They make it too easy to click "install everything" and end up with a stockpile of worthless programs. Of course, the expert or menu installs (same thing LoL) allow you to fine-tune the system. (I don't get it! Slackware is just as easy as Ubuntu when installing?!) Anyways, from experience, hitting the recommended install will leave users with a bad impression. If I were Peter V., I would remove that option.

Sigh...even Ubuntu is like that. Although, I like many of their GUI utilities.

Arch isn't! Which is why it may finally get a hard drive all to itself!

Me, I like GNOME though. KDE is just not me. Reminds me of M$. Its too unified and cluttered. Bloat city. I don't mind seeing options and advance settings, but you don't need to over complicate things. But I REALLY WISH that GNOME would scrap GConf. WE UNIX USERS DON'T WANT A REGISTRY EDITOR. lol... Anyways, I like GNOME because... I like it. No reason.

And, BTW, why is this thread still here? Oh well... It's a good topic My worthless two cents! G'day everyone!

Last edited by lupusarcanus; 03-02-2010 at 06:54 PM. Reason: 5p3LL!NG
 
Old 03-21-2010, 12:55 PM   #225
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I ask myself, best in what way. I mean Ubuntu on top? What is the definition of best distro and what does it have to do to get there? Just a lot of users and commercial good implemented is not always good.
 
  


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