LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > 2007 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards
User Name
Password
2007 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2007 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2007. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends February 21st.

Notices

View Poll Results: Programming Language of the Year
PHP 136 13.78%
Perl 77 7.80%
Python 215 21.78%
Ruby 74 7.50%
Java 108 10.94%
C 138 13.98%
C++ 167 16.92%
Lisp 18 1.82%
Smalltalk 4 0.41%
erlang 4 0.41%
Haskell 17 1.72%
C# 25 2.53%
JavaFX Script 4 0.41%
Voters: 987. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-06-2008, 04:17 AM   #31
verdeboy2k
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: /dev/random
Distribution: Gentoo amd64, CrunchBang amd64
Posts: 350

Rep: Reputation: 32

Had to put my in for Haskell, Simple yet, erm.... functional!
 
Old 01-06-2008, 10:43 PM   #32
angryfirelord
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Posts: 498

Rep: Reputation: 59
I'm used to doing things in Java and since it's fairly cross-platform, I voted for that. Python is getting better though and the syntax is easier to read in some ways.

Of course, I can't wait for Java 1.7.
 
Old 01-07-2008, 05:58 AM   #33
iwasapenguin
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Posts: 110

Rep: Reputation: 15
C++ was my pick. All other languages seem to specialise to much next to it.

Though I would like to see what would happen if you made a reduced form of the POSIX C libs with C++ syntax, replacing the FILE struct with a Java-esq hybrid of that and C++'s string and alot of the more usefull C++ and Java class's added in as well (all made smaller with only as many functions as absolutly needed of course).

Any one have hints on how to build something taht insane (other than not to). I even have a name XISOP!
 
Old 01-07-2008, 05:59 PM   #34
theriddle
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 172

Rep: Reputation: 30
C++ is C + OOP.
 
Old 01-07-2008, 06:51 PM   #35
Mega Man X
Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: ~
Distribution: Ubuntu, FreeBSD, Solaris, DSL
Posts: 5,339

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by theriddle View Post
C++ is C + OOP.
That is not correct, but not completely wrong either. It is not a very good definition nonetheless. C has some limited support to object-oriented programming approach and in the way you put it, makes it look like C has no support at all to OOP.
 
Old 01-07-2008, 06:54 PM   #36
theriddle
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 172

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mega Man X View Post
That is not correct, but not completely wrong either. It is not a very good definition nonetheless. C has some limited support to object-oriented programming approach and in the way you put it, makes it look like C has no support at all to OOP.
C++ = C + extensions
 
Old 01-07-2008, 07:17 PM   #37
Mega Man X
Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: ~
Distribution: Ubuntu, FreeBSD, Solaris, DSL
Posts: 5,339

Rep: Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by theriddle View Post
C++ = C + extensions
Now that definition is a good one . Was I being too picky? Sorry
 
Old 01-07-2008, 07:20 PM   #38
Mega Man X
Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: ~
Distribution: Ubuntu, FreeBSD, Solaris, DSL
Posts: 5,339

Rep: Reputation: 63
Oh yeah, I am voting for Java. It usually pays the bills, although I am secretly moving to python at home for my programming needs
 
Old 01-07-2008, 07:21 PM   #39
adam_k
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Distribution: Archlinux, OpenBSD
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Where's BASH ?
 
Old 01-08-2008, 05:55 AM   #40
tauseef
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Pakistan
Distribution: Mandrake
Posts: 15

Rep: Reputation: 0
What about good old Pascal ??
 
Old 01-08-2008, 10:20 AM   #41
taylor_venable
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Location: Indiana, USA
Distribution: OpenBSD, Ubuntu
Posts: 892

Rep: Reputation: 40
I'm going to vote for Smalltalk for no other reason than I wrote a compiler for it in 2007. Well, it's a cool language, too.

Really though, look at the milestones: there was a new version of Ruby, new MAJOR versions of Perl and Python are on the horizon, Erlang had a major new book published (with another one in the works), and Haskell has seen pretty good growth (as well as being the foundation of a Perl6 implementation). Exciting times for language enthusiasts!
 
Old 01-08-2008, 12:54 PM   #42
short circut
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Distribution: Fedora Core, and Gentoo eventually, but i hate (XKEU)buntu
Posts: 48

Rep: Reputation: 15
just a question. I have been programming in c++ for a while, and tried java. I really did not like it. What do you people like about it so much? I just dont get it.
 
Old 01-08-2008, 01:38 PM   #43
taylor_venable
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Location: Indiana, USA
Distribution: OpenBSD, Ubuntu
Posts: 892

Rep: Reputation: 40
short circuit: Most of my views about Java can be summarised pretty well by this article I read just today. It's nice for some things, but the kind of "one-size-fits-all" aura that surrounds it I think is unwarranted of any programming language.
 
Old 01-08-2008, 05:42 PM   #44
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
That is a pretty biased article if you ask me. It says more about CS departments than about Java itself. Students tend to become too graphically oriented? Uhm, sorry, I am self-taught and I can assure you that most Java books do not introduce GUIs until the very end of what are often 1500 page books. Or again, the Deitel book - which is more graphically oriented - does manage to show how to write a compiler for a virtual machine. Students rely too easily on borrowed classes and libraries? Not if they are taught the proper way. All of the advantages of C++ (with the exception of pointers) that are mentioned can easily be taught in a java course and, in fact, if you take books like those written by Eckel or Horton, you can be sure that they are. In the end, yes, Java is not the language of choice for the system engineer - but then again, how many CS graduates go into systems programming? I would think that Java does have a proper right to be considered the primary language and that C and C++ should be reserved for upper-level specialization.

Last edited by jay73; 01-08-2008 at 05:51 PM.
 
Old 01-08-2008, 11:18 PM   #45
drokmed
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: St Petersburg, FL, USA
Posts: 219

Rep: Reputation: 30
Python has the mojo now.
 
  


Reply

Tags
languages, lua


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
which programming language is used to do tcp/ip programming?? gajaykrishnan Linux - Networking 9 12-21-2012 05:16 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:08 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration