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2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite products of 2006. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends February 18th.

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View Poll Results: Text Editor of the Year
vi/vim 640 38.46%
emacs/xemacs 114 6.85%
Kate 277 16.65%
jEdit 24 1.44%
nano 160 9.62%
pico 31 1.86%
gedit 190 11.42%
Nedit 23 1.38%
joe 17 1.02%
Scite 21 1.26%
Midnight Commander Editor 43 2.58%
KWrite 124 7.45%
Voters: 1664. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-03-2007, 01:14 PM   #211
masinick
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Agreed


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy
Originally posted by masinick:

Definitely clarifies matters and I wasn't offended but thanks for the consideration.

Regards preference, I entirely agree that it's up to the individual and was merely making the point that I prefer a text editor to be good at just that one thing. If the truth be known, I was too lazy to be bothered learning all the other features of emacs and only ever used the editing function anyway. I wonder how many people have actually used emacs as a web browser.

As an aside, I remember a mate telling me a while back that he found using emacs keyboard shortcuts extensively was giving him RSI but I don't know if anyone else has experienced that.
I am glad you were not offended. I try to be careful with what I say, and never intentionally offend, though I can be controversial at times! ;-)

I have used GNU Emacs as a Web browser. It is OK for text only pages, similar to what you would access with links or lynx. Performance is not very good. On the other hand, Emacs has an excellent news reader, and I actually prefer reading news from Emacs whenever I can. Emacs also has an Email reader. Actually, it has SEVERAL Email clients. One is an extended feature of the Gnus news reader, and that is the most interesting one. There is also a GUI mail reader called VM, a classic Email reader called RMAIL, and an interface to the Rand Mail Handler (MH) called mh-e. Very rich Email environment and a very useful, if unconventional, environment.

These days, there are lots of text editors that highlight text and use color for keywords and syntax. GNU Emacs has always been among the leaders in this space. Even if a language comes along that Emacs doesn't handle, there are scripts for each language that can readily be written and/or adapted from existing scripts to support additional languages, so Emacs has great flexibility in this space.

No doubt about it, the greatest strength for Emacs is when you are utilizing multiple features. It is a very powerful editor in its own right, but dedicated editors may be more appropriate for specific features.

Frankly, I use multiple editors as well. As my overall editor, I do go with Emacs, but I certainly do not hesitate to use various dialects of Vi, as well as GUI based editors on various platforms, including desktop editors.
 
Old 07-04-2007, 02:17 AM   #212
amir_h
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just vim it!
vim has every feature an editor/IDE needs, light weighted, stable, ...
 
Old 07-04-2007, 12:17 PM   #213
Gothi[c]
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Quote:
I have used GNU Emacs as a Web browser. It is OK for text only pages, similar to what you would access with links or lynx. Performance is not very good. On the other hand, Emacs has an excellent news reader, and I actually prefer reading news from Emacs whenever I can. Emacs also has an Email reader. Actually, it has SEVERAL Email clients. One is an extended feature of the Gnus news reader, and that is the most interesting one. There is also a GUI mail reader called VM, a classic Email reader called RMAIL, and an interface to the Rand Mail Handler (MH) called mh-e. Very rich Email environment and a very useful, if unconventional, environment.
Other notable emacs features I personally use alot are: mp3 playing (emms) and IRC client (ERC) and Shell/Terminal (M-x shell, M-x ansi-term), and screen (elscreen).

It can be nice to have a split-screen buffer setup with two source files (think c++ source and header for example), have auto completion and intellisense-like features, but then also a small IRC buffer to talk to fellow developers, and a different screen with an mp3 playlist buffer, and a volume control buffer.

You can switch between your developer screen and your music screen, and when a song changes it's announced in the status line while you are in your developer screen.
 
Old 07-05-2007, 05:13 AM   #214
mikieboy
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I think I should try out some of these Gnu Emacs features for myself. It's very easy to get into a comfort zone and stay there but I won't know whether I'll like these things till I actually make that effort.
 
Old 07-20-2007, 01:34 AM   #215
iwasapenguin
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I know it's to late to vote but I have to say that Emacs is easier on command line begginers so I used to use it alot. now I log in graphically, open xterm and use vim from the command line
 
Old 07-20-2007, 08:52 AM   #216
mikieboy
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I think your right about emacs suiting beginners and it's probably related to the fact that it's so similar to bash hence less confusing for a newbie.
 
Old 07-21-2007, 08:16 AM   #217
Gothi[c]
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikieboy
I think your right about emacs suiting beginners and it's probably related to the fact that it's so similar to bash hence less confusing for a newbie.
It may be easier to get started, but to extend emacs to make use of all the powerful features and lisp extentions out there I found it harder to figure out than vim,... Vim's .vimrc is rather humanly readable while emacs' configuration file is written in lisp.
 
Old 07-21-2007, 10:03 AM   #218
taylor_venable
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gothi[c]
Vim's .vimrc is rather humanly readable while emacs' configuration file is written in lisp.
Believe it or not, some humans actually do write (and read) Lisp.
 
Old 07-21-2007, 06:21 PM   #219
Jorophose
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No editor can beat the mighty ee :P
 
Old 08-09-2007, 12:07 AM   #220
angryfirelord
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One nice thing about vi is that it's installed on pretty much any *nix OS, so vi is very cross platform.

I prefer the nice and simple nano editor though.
 
Old 08-09-2007, 12:16 AM   #221
iceman_san
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vim is the best
 
Old 08-25-2007, 03:55 PM   #222
provkitir
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I used to be an Emacs user, but recently switched to vi. Before people cast me as John Kerry I want to say that I was getting muscle cramps in my little finger, for CONSTANTLY having to hold down the Ctrl key. Sure you pound the Esc key in vim like a "sweet piece of Veal" (any arrested development fans here?), but there's never a need to hold down a key so far out of reach. Vim is the way of the future.
 
Old 08-26-2007, 07:18 AM   #223
maroonbaboon
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Where is the mighty e3? Vi, emacs, pico, wordstar and nedit emulation and a calculator all in 10,812 bytes. Runs on Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, Win9x, QNX, Atheos, BeOS, ELKS, and DOS.

Just the thing to stress-test your new 4GB quad core system.
 
Old 08-26-2007, 09:03 AM   #224
zsd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by provkitir View Post
I used to be an Emacs user, but recently switched to vi. Before people cast me as John Kerry I want to say that I was getting muscle cramps in my little finger, for CONSTANTLY having to hold down the Ctrl key. Sure you pound the Esc key in vim like a "sweet piece of Veal" (any arrested development fans here?), but there's never a need to hold down a key so far out of reach. Vim is the way of the future.
You are probably using a PC keyboard without remapping any keys. If you had a keyboard with the Ctrl key where God intended it (i.e, above the shift key, next to the "A") then you would find it much easier to do. There are various and sundry easy ways to do this, you might consider trying one, and then your little finger cramps will go away.

Cheers.
Jim
 
Old 08-26-2007, 10:03 AM   #225
Okie
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for editing text in a terminal & CLI mode i prefer midnight commander's mcedit (has excellent syntax highlighting)...


for a GUI text editor my favorite is NEdit (has excellent syntax highlighting & macros and uses ispell for spell checking),..
 
  


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