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By kittani at 2004-06-26 23:50
Comcast Kmail - HOWTO
( post #1)


This is a mini how-to describing the settings needed to use Kmail (KDE's mail client) to access your Comcast.net E-mail accounts. Comcast doesn't have a clue how to set it up since they don;t support linux so I figured out the details and figured I'd post it up here to save people some time.

Without Further Ado...

Step one - Information gathering

You need to get the following information from comcast (in case it's different)

Your User Name for the mail account
Your password
the outgoing smtp server
the incoming pop server
a bag of doritos.

Once you have this you are all set top open up Kmail

Step 2 - Configuring your Identity

For the rest of this we will create a ficticious user named bob. his e-mail account is bobmail@comcast.net. His outgoing mail server is smtp.comcast.net and his incoming is mail.comcast.net

when he first fires up Kmail he has to go to the "settings" menu up top. You can follow along too! From there he selects the "configure kmail" option. and a new window pops up.

on the left you will see various icons. The one you want is at the top and it is called "Identities" bob clicks it and the right pane changes. To the right click on new to add an identity for yourself. type in a name there. Bob types in "Bob's main E-mail" and presses ok. You can do the same with your own identity name.

Step 3 - Configuring the Mail options.

Now bob has a shiny new identity within Kmail, but he still can;t check his mail. He has to click on one more icon on the right, the "network" Icon.

when the right pane changes he sees two tabs... Sending and Recieving . For now bob starts adding things to the "sending" tab.

Bob goes to "message property" near the bottom and selects "Allow 8-bit" He knows Comcast dislikes MIME types anyways. You should set this too.

Underneath that he enters "comcast.net" in the box labeled "Default Domain" This will keep the comcast servers from thinking bob is trying to take over their network. Go ahead and enter that since you're a comcast customer too aren;t you?

Now bob can choose the "add..." button on the far right side. You been following? go ahead and click it to see what bob sees.

A simple button box... so far. Click on SMTP as the option (the radio button). Comcast uses SMTP instead of sendmail. The whole thing is a bust if you don;t set this. In the next window bob is taken aback by the options. Let's see what he eventually entered.

There are two tabs in this new window. One named "General" and the other "Security" We need to change options in both so let's start with General. Here's a list of the fields and what to put into them.

NAME: A name of your choice. bob used "bobmail@comcast.net"
HOST: The outgoing comcast mail server. bob used "smtp.comcast.net"
PORT: 21 (default port for SMTP)
(bob also checked the "server requires authentication" radio button)
LOGIN: bob entered "bobmail", the first part of his comcast e-mail address.
PASSWORD: You can enter it here if you want... bob did and then checked the "Store SMTP password button below" you can do however you like.

That's it for this pane. everything else should be blank or grayed out. On to the Security pane.

In here there are several options to choose from. Comcast needs TLS checked off under the "Encryption" block, and CRAM-MD5 under the "Authentication" block. Check those two boxes and outgoing is done. press ok!

Now the last part to configure is the "Receiving" tab of the main network window.

In here the settigns you need set up are exactly like the sending tab. The only diffrence is that you'll put the following into the fileds.

HOST: the pop server comcast gave you (usually mail.comcast.net)
PORT: 110 (the default for pop mail)

you can use the same stuff for all the other info... bob did so he didn;t get confused if he added another account later. As far as the other options go, you can save the password if you wish, and you can tell kmail to check automatically at set intervals. I leave this up to your discretion.

Next... once again is a second tab labeled "extras" The two options you want in here is "none" under encryption, and "clear text" under authentication. press ok and you're done...

As far as actually checking your mail and sending and recieving I think KDE's help system can walk you through that.

This tutorial was just for comcast users that needed to know the settings to set in order for KMail to get their mail and such.

Hope you enjoyed this and I hope it helps out.

by mrfrank on Sat, 2004-11-27 21:19
This fixed my problem with sending mail through sbcglobal.net.

Thanks!

by mikebaxter on Fri, 2006-08-25 16:42
Great 'how-to', my problem is there is no network button to configure after setting up the identity. I just installed SUSE 10.1today and am trying to set up KMAIL 1.9.1

by michaelnel on Mon, 2007-02-26 18:04
It says PORT: 21 (the default port for SMTP).

The default port for smtp is 25. 21 is for ftp.


  



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